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Episode 55 · 2 months ago

What's the Deal with Those Chinese Blockbusters?

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

How do Chinese blockbusters stand up against Hollywood blockbusters? In this episode, the gang dive into 4 of the biggest recent Chinese mega hits - each in a different instantly recognizable blockbuster genre - and give our verdicts.

So, what films are we looking at? (Timestamps)

The action sci-fi disaster film: The Wandering Earth - 13.03

The franchise starting buddy comedy: Detective Chinatown - 26.24

The "motivational" sports drama: Pegasus - 41.12

The most successful animated film in Chinese history: Ne zha - 54.30

Did we pick the wrong films? Are there better Chinese blockbusters we need to seek out ASAP? Go to ICMForum.com and let us know.

You are listening to talking images the official PODCAST M I C M Forum Dot Com. Well, hello everyone, I'm Chris and, Oh my God, Semi Wild guests, and assume that there are two types of listeners for this episode, those who pay attention to the global box office and know exactly what this episode is about, and those who may not be aware that Chinese films have started to compete with Hollywood when it comes to just wracking in the big box. Every year we are seeing Chinese blockbusters make a killing, and many are among the extended list of top grossing films of all time, including three in the all time top hundred. Has China Taken Hollywood to task? How do these films actually compare to their American equivalence? Do they have something American blockbusters do not have, or are they just sheep imitations? Oh and should film fans be paying more attention to China and Chinese blockbusters, because so far western audiences just don't seem to, despite the fact that these films are usually readily available on Netflix, Amazon prime and other streaming services. To answer these questions, material soul and I have picked out four completely different Chinese blockbusters, starting with the wandering earth, a huge sci fi action spectacle, before we then continue to the detective Chinatown Franchise, but the almost cup comedy, because those still do well in China. And then we'll move on to pick us, US for the quote unquote, Inspirational sports drama, another type of film that is seemingly alive and well, before we finally finish off with the biggest animated blockbusters so far in China's history, near Shah. We are going to dive into the special effects, the production values, the acting and the character development, the storytelling and everything else. You see just how swept away and or unimpressed we are with these four films. So let's get mature and soul into the conversation here and also set the stage a little bit by asking the titler question of this episode. What's the deal with these Chinese blockbusters? are a good, bad, mediocre, better than Hollywood? Oh and we can probably get this temperature check started in alphabetical order. So, mature, take it away. What's the deal with the Chinese blockbusters? Well, I guess the deal is the kind of try to do their own version of Hollywood, like others have done before and are still doing as far the general question of are they better or worse, and it's I have seen on very small samples. So from my experience I would say a bit worse, but I'm stiminitely curious about them anyway. So I think the deal with these Chinese blockbusters is that in China there is quite a bit of censorship. So in terms of what's approved for release, there isn't a whole lot of films. So a lot of these films, I think, right up the big box office numbers because there's simply is there anything better showing if you want to go out and see something? But in terms of the quality of it, like mature said, they're trying to do the same thing as Hollywood and create their own Hollywood films, and I don't think they're any better or any worse in other countries when it comes to doing that. A lot of countries have tried doing their own Hollywood films and I don't think the ones from China are particularly better or worse, but you know, they are interesting. Is the limits on the number of films released that you mentioned? So is that only for sign films? Because that's what I thought and I guess there was a censorship for Chinese films, of course, but I don't know if there's the same limits. Do you know? No, I don't know. All I know is from what I've read from one of the people set on letter box on other sites. They talked about the films and I do know that the limited availability of what's out there is one of the contributors to why they do so well successfully at the box office in China. Okay, so that's that's a really interesting take for sure, and thank you for adding that in. So I mean, I haven't seen a whole lot of Chinese blockbusters, especially from the last year, but I will say that from what I have seen, the effects add upt. They clearly have the budgets to deliver films in the same scope as Hollywood or close. So there's very little to be desired there. And in terms of the general quality, mean for this episode we've gone through a...

...fairly small sample, like I mentioned previously, so I'm not sure how representative that is, but if we just take this small sample and compared to a small sample of Hollywood, I don't think the quality is that far off. I haven't seen a recent Chinese blockbuster that I would say it is great in the same way that some American blockbusters actually managed to be. But yeah, I would say that overall I'm very impressed by what China has actually been managing to turn out. Yeah, in terms of the effects, that's definitely true that they definitely are on power with Hollywood on on that part. And I would say I'm like you. I have a very actually the whole all of the films we are going to talk about in this episode or there some total of recent Chinese blockbusters that I've seen. So, yeah, very limited experience, but I remember when I saw one of them a few years ago I was thinking, Oh yeah, that's great. I hope there's better. And I, like you, Chris, I don't think I've seen yet the very good Chinese bombuster. I mean it's probably out there that I haven't encountered it yet, I guess. Okay, I don't know if I've seen a very good Chinese blockbuster either. I have seen more than mature has. A lot of them are films that I watched during the May challenge on the I C M Forum, which was for Hong Kong and Chinese and Taiwanese films. So I saw quite a few then, but there are even ones that I've seen before, that I've probably seen around ten in total, maybe twelve. None of them really stand out is particularly amazing, but most of them for me have at least been fairly enjoyable. Like we've already said, they're pretty good on the special effects. That got the budget to be able to create these things and I guess in that sort of respect they're doing a bit better than maybe Nigeria, Nollywood, is doing. Have you seen many notty wood films? I mean that's a bit of attention, but I always hear about naughty wood, but they've never seen one one of those FIS. So have you? I've seen I'm not sure how many I've had. I've seen maybe four or five. So I guess not a big enough sample to like quantify, and saying Noy would not good at all or anything. Do anyone which I thought was really good as it was interesting with a thrilling one chord, the CEO, which is about these people applying for this CEO job. But yeah, the rest of them which I saw, I didn't really do much for me. Very, you know, sentimental, very over the top acting, or at least the small sample I've seen. Yeah, I want to seen one Nigerian film, and it's not an oliver the film. It's it's it was specifically marketed as an independent Nigerian film, because only this is so all encompassing now, and it's the film was. This is my desire, which obviously made some rounds on festivals a couple of years ago. So I have nothing to add on on it would but coming back to China and their pockbust inestually, I know that both of you actually answer this question already, but just to set the stage before we get into the movies, I I do actually have to ask how many others and these blockbusters have you seen before the encounters, because at the very least they were also all that fairly big event back in the mid two thousand's and you had films like a hero and the houses, Flying Tigers, etcetera. So I'm assumed this aren't the very first Chinese blockbusters you're seeing, Matthia. Well, I guess it depends how do you define China, but I actually haven't seen those two ve FM even though, even though I'm quite interested in them, especially both of them here in the House of flying digeress but I haven't seen them. So I've seen like coaching tiger, but that's not really that small Taiwanese slash Western co production. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, and and then the Hong Kong films, which are obviously also a bit different. So No, I actually haven't. M I'm very unqualified for this podcast. I'm think the world of the don't know the Nubie. I guess. Well, I think, I hope I really unqualified this for this episode, except perhaps this also. You messed. At least seen more than they met. You. How many Chinese blockbursters would you say that you've seen so well, I think I said about maybe actors in before, but I'm not sure if. Guess it turns when you defined it like mature. I haven't seen hero or House of Flying Dagger or curse of the Golden Flower, any of those films yet, and I know I've been to see them a for longer than he has. I guess that I don't even excuse for it, but I guess those films didn't really appeal to me at the time in terms of what I have seen from China and how being both going through my eyeing DB stats, because they're always awful look at. But just look at what I've seen since I've joined letter box. Actually, if I try and sort it by when I added on them, and some of them are going to be co productions with Taiwan or co productions with Hong Kong's will actually be genuine China films. But I've seen the mermaid, which...

...was a Stephen Chow film which did a really good box office. I've seen triple threat, but I think there might have been a Chrobo director with a few other Asian countries. I've seen you other three detected chinatown films. Enter the Fat Dragon, lost in Hong Kong, which is actually a whole series of different films, like that drug war, which is the first film which Johnny Toe did in mainland China. Connected, which is a thriller about this person little phone getting a telephone phone call and this person has been kidnapped, to try and help her out. Hello, MR billionaire, which is a version of brewster's millions. It's actually not half bad for what it is goodbye, Mr Loser, which is from the same team and made hollow Mr Billionaire, but it's absolutely terrible. So I wouldn't recommend that. So I didn't count it all up, but they'll just give lists to taste of what I've seen going into the podcast. Yeah, that's that's quite a list, soul. I mean I've seen a couple of others. I mean I didn't realize the cliff workers was the blockbuster hit, but it was. It's on the all time box office list. So at least I have cliff workers down. I have a lot of, quote unquote, older ones from the serials in also from Shang from the more recent ones. I'm not sure if they qualify as Hong Kong or shine. I think their co productions, but things like it man, for instance, I've seen in terms of the last few years. I think I think it's really just like I mentioned, cliff workers and brand new want called the writer's Abyssy, which is a kind of fantasy action film, but that's not on the box office list yet. So let's let's see how that one does or if it ends up there at all. But yeah, I would say that I'm the second least qualified here and it's all this then the most qualified or the third least qualified. So I think that's that's a lot to work with. And now that we were pretty much established how relatively little we've seen, at least compared to the large hordes of American blockbusters. I think we have the proper framing here to Europeans and one Australian jumping in relatively blind. So take this episode for you know what it is near instant reactions and you know perhaps our choices of the films we are discussing today. It's quite bad. Perhaps you know they're much better blockbusters out there and you would have completely different reactions to a different set of films. So let's see. Feel free to come to the I C M Forum and educate US more throughout, recommendations, et Cetera, but for the rest of this episode we just won't dwell too much on that. We'll just get straight into the actual discussion. And what better way than to jump to some of the just very first things we think about when we hear the word blockbuster the massive action film, the huge Sci fi film or, you know, the gigantic world round disaster film, and with the wandering Earth, we essentially get these three pillars of blockbuster madness all wrapped up into one. When we talk about disaster films that spanned the entire world. This one really delivers, as from the very premise, the earth is literally traveling, Spinning from our solar system to another, propelled by gigantic engines to get away from the expanding sun, and this seems to be going okay, before an earthquake destroys some of the engines and set them on a coalition course with Jupiter. This just has everything we've come to expect from the massive disaster film, family drama, a massive gallery of characters, often dying characters, heroism, sentimentality, last minute escapes and again, as we mentioned in our early discussion, just fantastic effect. Oh and some plot seemingly ripped off from two thousand one. So I would love to hear what my co hosts thought of the wandering earth and and for simplicity, we can start with you again, Matthya. Yeah, so this is when I actually saw, back when it came out, at least here, that that is on Netflix, and I saw it because I was familiar with it, that there's a novel. It's it's acted from a novel. I have not read that, but I've read other novels by the same author and I love them, and so I think I came into this movie with perhaps maybe slightly misjudged expectations, perhaps because again, I haven't read the read the novel. But my expectations were not volunt Mush right. I mean I...

...didn't I didn't know that there would be pretty massive spectacle. But you mentioned a disaster movie. I was not thinking of it on in these in these terms. I was more thinking of it of a big Sci fi film with, you know, complex ideas that and I think they're there. But the film, in some ways it takes a lot of lessons from Hollywood, and not just good ones. I think it's it's very spectacular and it's very it's it's based. It's very effective on the basic level, right, on a very basic emotional level. But I remember being struck particularly by the editing and thinking, oh no, the kind of way too erratic editing that is pretty present in Hollywood is also going to take over China, apparently, which I think is also kind of true for the other films we saw. But yes, so my impression of the wondering Earth was a bit mixed. It's definitely a visual spectacle and on that level again, I mean you mentioned the plot. The plot is insane. And it's definitely going to get you images that we've never seen before, but perhaps maybe not as much as you may talk and yeah, I think. I think the story telling, the storytelling is at times not served, but not either way. The film is made in some ways like mature. The wandering earth is a film that I saw way back in the day, I guess twenty nine team when it came out, because it was available on Netflix. It was in the all time box office list and I think, if I remember correct, it was actually quite a big deal made of it at that time. Must have been one of the first real big ones to penetrate the list or get really high up in it, because, you remember, there are being quite a bit of discussion about it on the I C M Forum and I thought we'll look. I like SCI FI films. I don't mind a bit of action. I'll go and I watch it and from what I remember of it, it does have some great images. They've got the shot of Jupiter sucking in the atmosphere of the earth. As a sci Fi film, though, I guess I found it a bit disappointing. I remember there being quite a bit of melodrama in there, which takes up a lot of the film and a lot of the action just, I guess, you know, thinking back of it three years later, he just felt like mindless action. I mean I liked some of the ideas, but that's because they're sci fi ideas that I like sci fi, I don't know how well they're necessarily worked into it. So, like mature said, it's a visual spectacle and it's probably enjoyable enuf as that as a blockbuster. Yeah, I guess maybe no better, no worse than the average mindless Hollywood blockbuster out there. Yeah, that's pretty much my take as a well solved I think while I was watching it, disaster films craft up more and more. Is My reference point for me, because it felt like a bit of a mixture of various all memory films, for instance, like the day after tomorrow and two thousand well for instance. In that you know you have eyes everywhere, you have these essential destruction of the world, you have these factors racing to save the planet survive, and that, I think, in terms of fault. It's it's right there. I mean the character development is quite weak as far as I'm concerned, but that's just the standard in this kind of Gendre, so I wasn't too bothered by that. I think the suspense was great. I think again, the effects were amazing. Probably my biggest issue with the film was the word sentimentality, which almost bordered on silly a few times. Like so often when characters die, you kind of stopped the film and you get flashbacks, you get like them saying something heroic before they died, or perhaps the last word is something heroic and like everything is, the music is played up to make it extra sad and that just didn't work for me. It just felt really hammed up. But outside of those moments, did this film really goes through. It is high octane action. You have those, you know, insane road rage moments with this big truck, trucks driving through collapsing ice blocks, you have the massive explosions, you just have so much insanity that if, if what you're looking for is, you know, that action blockbuster trill of just seeing insane effects and craziness, this will probably not as the point. Yeah, but when when you mentioned that the character development is on power with the genre, I guess that's that's the thing. It's really a disaster movie. It's it's really that but yeah, it's not a smart spaci fi blockbuster, which is kind of what I was hoping it would be. One of the interestings about it is also the way to a is kind of international cooperation. Right there is this big, big thing with Hollywood blockbuster made with Chinese involvements. Right Way, you always have China playing a role in helping out to it, like the Martian...

...being one of the big examples, and I guess this is interesting because it shows kind of the the view you have on the Chinese side, which is, yes, let's promote this international cooperation, but which I think is um it's just interesting to see it's it's a pretty conventional idea, but the way it's promoted in this film is slightly different, I feel, than what it would be in the Horwood boodbuster, and that's kind of what I'm interested in, is to see the the such a differences, because really, for the most part they are pretty similar, more similar than I thought they would be, those Chinese bogbusters to Hollywood, like that's what I took from watching those this very small sample. Yeah, that's that's a great point, but I think one of the obvious elements there is that the two astronauts that, you know, kind of bond and go on a bit of mission together. Is Anice astern and the Russian Austronaut, building on the you know, the obvious, the Chinese Russian relations. And then you have that Americans get much less air time, but they're they're actually get more French and I think it's very interesting, especially for our east, with that. Essentially the rural government is seen as French. It's not that necessarily that weird, because EU language, etcetera, has often been seen as French and French has been a political language, but it was notable. That's essentially almost any reference to, you know, international collaboration, etcetera was focused on the French and the French or the first answer in many instances as well. So that must have been quite nice for you. Well, I think we are meant to represent Europe in general and the fact is, you know, French is an official language of the U N. So it's it's kind of has this diplomatic world. It's also something that is in in his novels, this author too, of seeing a Europe at least as being equally important as the US. That's what I mean. Right where say international because when the US does international, it's the Russians and maybe the Chinese, as in this it's a little more complete. I mean, Africa doesn't exist, but aside from that, it's, it's, it's it's a bit small right international, which I do I do think is a bit of a positive, even though it's clearly again that ish. That's a little more agreeable, I guess. Yeah, I mean, I think in terms of propaganda it has this thing that the Chinese, China, is getting, you know, a little bit non for with obviously Chinese characters being extremely heroic and self sacrificing, et Cetera, obviously something you know, we would see in a lot of Russian and Soviet type action films as well. But yeah, I don't think, I mean it's not really a film that showcases China, as how they put it, stronger or better, especially if you compare to the flag waving kind of disaster film that America often puts out. I thought it was almost a little bit more mellow and a little bit more focused on the international collaborations. So yeah, I think it actually it's it's right, more or less right there on the threshold, and I agree with you it's interesting to see how much more focused they give Europe than America usually does. No, this might also be bringing in a bit poor politics than we need to for this episode. Also, I think one of the things that struck me the most is the how they put it. Did Two thousand and one semi Ri puff where you have the AI going a bit rogue up in the space station and acting against the Austro nots, I mean the robot or the AI, did not get the kind of development or suspense as alted in two thousand and one, but the characteristation is very, very similar, including the climax with it. So it was interesting that they did that, just how similar it was and the fact that it actually wasn't as suspenseful as that section of two thousand and one, in my mind, because the tag this was not as development, was not as focused on, and that might simply be because you had so many characters and it was trimmed down so much. But it was definitely an interesting moment because they obviously had to give the authro not something to do when they were so removed from all of the suspense down at Dart. Yeah, think without add to that, I agree that it doesn't work as well because two thousand one is this very focused. I mean this part of the two thousand one is very focused twitter essentially, and this this film obviously doesn't have the luxury to do that right. It has too many things going on. But I mentioned that the author of the book his main that his big hero is arthritic luck. So I think I'm guessing this like straight up two thousand and one reference is straight from the book. That that that would be my guess. Anyway. It's more literary reference than the earthenmaker reference, if that makes sense. I mean it works both ways. I might just side with the whole ai malfunctioning part that. Yeah, I didn't think there was very derivative of two thousand one, of space. Honestly, I guess maybe I didn't mind that didn't compare to it, because I actually can't think of any films at all that I've tried to copy the whole health thing in two thousand and one. I don't think. I don't think of any films have done it anywhere near as well. So I guess I don't really mind. It was more cure us to see that in...

...a Chinese film. Really I can't name any, but I feel like I've seen a lot of AI in Zai Fai. I'm blanking on on naming any, but I feel like it's been done a lot. It has been done a lot, but it's never been done as well as two thousand one of space odysty so I mean like the simpsons have done, and I believe in one episode you've got some similarities with films like moon, although that takes in a different directions. So it's been done countless times before, but it's never been done to the same extent as two thousand and one. So for me it was just another thing in there. It wasn't something where like I'm so disappointed there's not as good as two thousand and one because no film has done it as good as two thousand one. Yeah, I would never have expected it to PSP. There's two thousand one than handling it did. We can definitely give it a pass there and to pass the torch on them to our next Chinese blockbuster off the day. This is a far less drim if we can say it like that, because one thing we didn't call about the wonder neeward is that there is, like we said, a lot of death. There's a lot of mayhem, there's a lot of destruction. There's a lot of mayhem and destruction in detective Chinatown as well, but it's in a far more run way. And this one really feels like a throwback to what Hollywood was peppering the screens with it in the eighties, nineties and even early zeroes, in films like Russia Hour, for instance, buddy comedies in a crime setting, often with cops, and here with a quote unquote detective, you know, he's a bit shady but scrappy enough to be lovable. And of course, the sidekick or partner, the stuttering, reserved cousin of an in law twice removed or you know, however that endless list of how they were connected actually went for. It was just this long, long list for community effect. And this odd couple needs to resolve a mystery to escape cops, gangsters, actually multiple different gangsters, and I'm mysterious killer. I mean this one once again has everything we think about and we think buddy comedy, especially in, you know, a crime access action setting. You have the car chases, the suspense, as I mentioned, the odd couple dynamics. I mean that that just has to be there. And here we also throw in the foreign setting of Thailand. So starting with you again, Mateau, what did you think about Detective Chinatown? So I can say I loved it, but it was definitely my favorite of the four. And it's Um as you mentioned, it's really much it really plays like a throwback for us, but it plays like very much like a nineties Hollywood film, complete with a lot of homophobic jokes, which would definitely be at me the nineties Hollywood film, but not so much today. And Yeah, it's it's it's got a lot of really obvious influences. I mean Jackie Chan is a big one. I think that you see a lot of those early chases with the main character, well one of the main characters, who is doing a lot of comedic stuff mixed with action, and it's actually pretty good action. I think that's one of the big differences between this and and wondering earth. This is pretty low on the VFX. It's it's a lot of practical action which actually works pretty well. And Yeah, it's a big mix of genres, also not as much as like Bollywood does it, but I mean the basic premise is essentially a hitchcock wrong man narrative kind of where you you have a man on the run trying to prove his innocence, except he's also being helped by a kind of sherlock HOLMB's Super Fan. And and in terms of the stylistic elements there I found it very interesting that they basically took the show look from the BBC TV series. I mean that's even the music when he's doing his like super precise analysis of looking at very small details, it's kind of similar to to that through. So it's taking a lot of influences from everywhere and kind of packaging them together, which is what popular entertainment does as well. And speaking of shot comes, are also a bit of Guy Witch in there. That's that's in terms of the style. That's one element that I think is kind of common to not so much wondering earth, but the other three is it's they're very bold films stylistically. I think compared to Hollywood films, they do a lot more weird stuff with the camera. Right, there are a lot more than they're lot afraid to to be a little kitchy at times, which I think is generally a positive right, because I mean sometimes it kind of loses you. But in general there are a lot, a lot more adventurous, I think, stylistically, which which can be a good thing. It's it's it's it hasn't it's limits this film, but I guess I did kind of enjoy it for the most part, and especially the I guess the Corup...

Cup was was my favorite character by fat and yeah, the way they treat the what I'm talking about with the kind of visual style, in the way they kind of go for a book in some things. It's like this this character of the Cowboy Cop, right, and they they go full on Western music when he appears and they do a lot of slow more I don't know, I think that that's not something kind of refreshing about that, about the way they will just run with an idea, of visual and statistic idea, even if it doesn't always fully work. I would agree with mature that detective child and talent is the best of the films were discussing today. I wouldn't say absolutely loved it. I did have some reservations about it. I mean it is quite a long film and there's some really silly things and they're grabbing groins and so on, but in general it does actually work as a comedy. I do wish it worked a bit better as a mystery. The whole idea of having a shot like Holmes character or type of character is really, really interesting, but it's not used that often. I mean there's a few things where used as the skills of deduction, but for the most part the films a comedy. So the mystery for me, I thought was a bit neglected. The sequels do a bit better with that, which we might come to later on. I might reckly mention the sequels afterwards, but in terms of this first film, yeah, it's enjoyable. They're they're bonding after initial friction is very easy to predict, but I thought chemistry together. There are some great actually parts in there. It's really interesting to hear what mature thought the influences, because the biggest influence to me actually thought was Buster Keaton in the part where they created distraction and the police headquarters or police office and you've got all these bumbling cops that are tripping over and going to all these traps which they put in place there and that secrets. For me was probably the funniest sequeens of the entire film and that for me was very key to dish. But then there's another power which I also thought which was really funny, which involved having all these guys hiring your different closets in this woman's upstairs apartment and a boyfriend charging and all these people me to pretend they're big surprise relatives for surprise party. I just thought the whole comedy, the way everybody went along with that, worked really, really well for me. Detective Chinatown is a success for me as a comedy. As a mystery less so, and that's probably the disappointment for me. As an action film, not so much so. I mean, there are those great sequences in there, but for me I guess it's mainly a comedy that the film's trying to be. said, mainly a comedy. It primarily works. Yeah, I think I agree with that. I'm a little bit torn on this because a lot of the comedy is, that Mata mentioned, really childish and and that's what took a lot of it away from me. I mean that there's a lot of growing jokes, there's a lot of, you know, sticking tons of people's butts jokes. There's a lot of this, just like extreme silliness. That brings it down a bit of a not but those things who describe their soul, especially the police station, but also the scene where people hiding in closets like those are, you know, Bang on the money, really really fun and I think there are a lot of quite hilarious scenes throughout. I mean we mentioned a lot of this budd cop companies and think Jackie Chan is definitely one of the biggest influences and I think he was quite influenced by Wester Keaton. Kith might have been influenced. There's a lot of this visual comedy. Those are the ones that work the best. I also think the odd couple elamics here is pretty spot on and the fact that they didn't make the innocent character. They show loot com character, the introverted character, and they didn't actually make him that innocent. In the end it has a bit more surprises of its sleeves than you might expect and, as we a lot of these Chinese or might feel a little bit closer to a lot of Hong Kong films, even though the Chinese, but a lot of these films they do have a bit more moral ambivalence about them, like the characters there are by no means clean or nice. You have you know, they got the Cup who say my best friend Cop who's secretly helping them a bit, and he's doing that even though he thinks that his friend is a killer for a while there, for instance. But there's just a lot of fun and cool gangs there. There's just this insane and massive character gallery. Most of them are not that developed but they do enough with, you know, their facial expressions here, styles, etcetera, just make them notable for when they're there and deliver. I think, the chases, etcetera to they all, you know, add up. They deliver. It's fun, it's action packed and I did actually enjoy the mystery. I agree. It kind of took the back seat and I've more or less forgot about it for the Middle Section of the film.

But towards the end when they start playing with twists and try to surprise a little bit there there were some cool ideas coming up there. There weren't as developed as probably Prett have been more fun to see, like they were still taking the back seat to the comedy, but it was interesting that they went all out with some of these twists and went for in a bit of a darker direction as well. I think you're right in saying it it feels a little more like Hong Kong fin and I think maybe that's because it's taking place outside of China and that's maybe allows it to be a little more to to to be less bothered, I guess, about showing like again, a corrupt cup right, because it's a corrupt copy in in Bangkok, right it. It's not a problem with censorship, and it's the same with the sequences, which are also taking place outside China. I haven't seen them, but so some might mention it and the very bad humor. I guess it's it's pretty reminiscent of Hong Kong comedies in that way as well, and it's also true of some of the other films. We will talk about a lot of silly faces, and I did like that Vodeville sequence that you, you, you guys mentioned, with everyone hiding in the closets. It's it's a classic. It's like the Max brothers and and and even like theater before that. But yeah, it's not, it's not pretty. Well, I mean, if there's a lot to enjoy that, I think it's it's limited in in a bunch of ways I kind of agree with, so that the mystery is not never that interesting and the twist at the end is like yeah, okay, it's it's a fun twist, but it's not. I mean it's it's it's a lot of the problem when you have that kind of this genius character is that it's it's basically a deuce x macina and that at one point he solves it using things that are kind of not very realistic and at the same time he misses things. It's the it's the whole issue with with mystery, mystery storytelling, when you have a guy who's a genius in a way that is not really grounded in reality. It's a very good point that you make, mature about the detect the child to town feel big set entire land and therefore it's easier to have corrupt cops and other individuals doing different things. Because I actually have seen both the sequels, in fact both the sequels, the second one, which is set in America the third one, which is set in Japad, are actually the only two detect the China tailed films are the all time box office list. So the first film did gross quite a bit, but it didn't gross that much to be an official check. And I check movies and it is kind of funny seeing how anymore checks the second third film have over the first film, because people just going, I just want to get the official checks. I'm just going to watch the second third one because the series does actually develop a fair bit over the course of three films and to just run through them briefly. So the second film they come to America and again for me it's more of a comedy rather than a mystery or an action film. You've got a really great trump lookalike character who wants to build a wall on the west coast of an America to try and stop our immigrants coming in from that way. There's a bazooka wielding batty in there and there are also some intimidating bike he's in there who end up coming to the rescue of the two main characters. Some of the comedy there is really silly. There's a half dayked street chase which is just, you know, absolutely ridiculous. There's a bit of cross dressing in there which I guess for me is probably one of the least funny things a comedy you can ever do. There is a really cooler crime master APP in there which actually appears in the third film also, and I guess it's only which by carry into a fourth APP which the Sherlock Holmes type character uses. So I mean it's all quite interesting, but again it's a film works, which works much better as a comedy is an action or a mystery film. The third film, on the other hand, it actually does have a pretty interesting mystery in it. So it's set in Japan and they've got an Agathi Christie type of mystery to solve. So it's about this guy. He gets killed in this room which is locked or something like that. As particulars may it only be one way they could be killed, but maybe there would have been another way. I mean, the mystery is still never the center part of it. It is mainly a goofy comedy and there's cross dressing in there again, which seems to be the big thing with the franchise orthough don't remember any cross dressing in the first film. But and there's competitive bomiting and some other silly stuff in there. But there's also some really interesting parts and they've got some riddles to solve. There's not quite die hard with a vengeance, but there are some riddle parts in there and there's an interesting part of Shilla homes guy talking to himself different points to try and solve the mystery, like it's talking two different equotations of himself. But you know, look, in general it's probably not better than the first or second film, but it is a bit more interesting because they try and work a bit more of the mystery into it than the first two films do. So Yeah, look, overall there's worst franchise as you could watch...

...the detective China Town Franchise. I mean not, none of them are really short films, but all of them there's a lot of energy in there, like maturest a lot of the camera. They just go for it. Those shots of the characters walking out there and there's big trench coats swinging out behind them. There's a lot of energy put into it and I guess the energy levels really keep the film up even when the comedy dips a bit at other times. Oh and I just shouldn't mention also there's a really funny part which is almost as funny as a closet mix up in the first film. which involves some more contendents and and elevator. I'm not gonna say anymore about that, but anybody's seeing the film will know that part, and that's really the funniest part of detective Chinatown Three. Well, thanks for that the summary there. So I mean like Ma Doo, I haven't seen the two sequels yet. I'm definitely semi interested in seeing them. I might see them in the future. But, unlike you, Detective Phantom is actually not my favorite of, uh these four films. In fact, it was probably tied with the wandering Earth as an okay film. Well, actually liked the next to quite a bit, and my favorite of the four films was Pegasus, which I no soul disagrees with. But just to give the quick into the peas first, that we can start with the mini battle. This film is really just a love letter to not just sports or, in this case, car racing, but just to following your passion. Our lead is a disgraced race car driver desperate to get back to his almost all consuming passion and once his suspension is lifted, the race that may, we established him on the scene and show that he truly is China's greatest race car driver is the new target. The film hits many of the standard ideas of the older sports hero trying to get back on the horse that you know, we've known and loved from Hollywood over the years, complete with the scrappy heroes the big race ahead. But, at least for me, what is most impressive about take us this is how different it felt and how it stayed away from so many of the standard tropes of Hollywood sports dramas or Hollywood sports comedies. And frankly, it is far more of a comedy than a drama. I enjoyed that. I don't think solved it. So let's slip things around a little bit there and let's all respond. First, and what do you think about peg uses and why didn't it work for you? I started out actually quite lacking. Tegasus, I mean in the first few scenes were really funny. That's some really funny moments regarding his racing costume, exaggerated stories, accellental hugging of the wrong person. But as the film went along, for me I think the comedy pretty much started to dry up. It all became about a termination to succeed and it wasn't really about cubrious mishaps along the way. It was just about, you know, be determined. I'm going to succeed, I'm going to be the best or whatever. And for me the disappointment of it is that after this really great comedic start, it becomes a very generic, or at least to me, very generic, inspirational sports drama. That said, the final five minutes are really bonkers and you know that really, you know, made me think all made. I didn't hate this film overalls. It does end in quite a different way, so to speak, and you know, the ending is really good at that's sort of what I was looking for. But a lot of the film for me, was really ground in reality and I didn't think there was anywhere near where I was successful. And I mean I'm not a big Fan of sports films in the first place, and going down to Earth round an approach to me was completely wrong in my opinion, and I think it was. I would have been a good fi comedy throughout, I guess, much like it act the China town was. Maybe it would have been something that I would have been able to respond to better. So I was very confused by this film. Um, I went into it knowing that Chris had liked it, and I think I kind of got why, because if you squint really hard you might be able to apply the word bractain to this film. Maybe, and we know Chris loves that. Um It's it's a thing that's constantly undercutting itself. Right, there's a bunch of scenes where you get kind of what would be a standard moment in an inspirational sports movie and it immediately doesn't work and the characters are ridiculed, but at the same time it still has the basic plots of an inspirational sports movie. Is it still is that narrative. In a sense, it made me think less of what an American sports movie would be like then what French equivalent movie would be. And the reas for that is as as you guys mentioned. It's...

...a lot more grounded, supposedly, or at least it's a lot more interested in the drama of the characters than it is in the actual spectacle of the sports. What you do get it at the end, but you don't get that much of it, and it's not very focused at all on the minutia, right, of what it is like to be a racing driver or anything like that. It's much more grounded emotionally and it's, yeah, focused on being inspirational and feel good, even though the ending is bold, I will say, if we're taking it in that in that regard so so. It's in many ways unconventional, and I think the reason the French movie of that kind art like that, by the way, is mostly budget, I would say, as much as sensibility, different sensibilities also. I don't know if it's the case of this one, but yeah, I was very persled by this film. I don't think the constant back and forth right between standard inspirational story and undercutting itself and making fun of what it is really works for me. I think it's in the end it's it's kind of lost me as a viewer, but it's definitely a much stranger film than the other we are talking about, which it can be a good thing. Yeah, I think I agree with pretty much all of that. So, like I said the beginning of the episode, none of these films really stood out as great, but this is the film I like the most and I think the artuleness we mentioned here is definitely one of them. I mean, I don't think we should spoil the ending, but that ending Um it's not what you would ever have seen in an American film and it has two endings as well. So it has possibly slightly more ambiguous or dark ending and then this all out crazy ending, and both of them really deliverous or something that I don't think we would see in an American film of this kind. The one thing I would slightly with soul and perhaps even new materials, that I didn't necessarily think it was consistently that grounded, I thought, comedy, or more or less there throughout until perhaps the final act of the chorus where things gets a bit more serious. Don't just skip the main part of these kinds of sports films where you have the protagonists trying to get back on you know, the Horse's training, he's practicing, he's getting better. None of that is essentially there. Is Instead, you get to these ridiculous scenes where he has to get his license back, for instance, and he trashes the car, or you get the scenes where he tries to steal the frame of his old car. We have all of these big comedic scenes and those pretty much continue for it, I would say sixty percent plus of the film's running time. It keeps having fun with itself. I agree that some of the undercutting is not always great. The direction is not necessarily fantastic care either, but it is really fun and, like you mentioned, when he goes in with his into the courthouse to essentially plead his case to become unsuspended and he comes in with his race car suit and it doesn't realize that the race car suit will deep in the Metro detecture has to take it all off in front of the cameras and the speeder in his underwear. Those kinds of scenes are really bang on the money for this type of comedy and I think it consistently delivers on the left. It consistently delivers on the craziness that picks, those scenes of him running to watch a friend to help them, especially the first one where you always runs to the wrong person, those are also, like all sat quite hilarious. I think it continues more or less in that vein. But what impressed me a decent amount too was just how, unlike Mosul said, I don't actually think it felt conventional at all because most like I mentioned already, that the main tropes of just this race car driver getting ready, practicing, etcetera, those are completely gone. But this also has no low and low interest of any kind. I mean the romance in the story, if anything, is with his adopted son and, you know, trying to be a father with very limited resources and bring the sun along on adventures. So that's something that's quite different from how American films do it, because they tend to always, almost always, have a love interest. And this is also something we see with quite a few Asian films in general, that, you know, parental child issues often gets more focused, but this is a blockbuster and not quite expected. That was a very nice touch. And then you also have the fact that there is no real antagonist. You have kind of an antagonist in the sense that you have this other great new race car driver who is the new best thing and our hero wants to beat him. But this guy is actually really nice and it's a very so many tropes there, because essentially this guy is a billionaire and I guess it plays into China's take on billionaires and multi millionaires in that, you know, they're kind of great for the country. I suppose you have this guy and she's buying the sport, but he's helping the sport and he's being such an nice guy is always helping. Even though...

...the hero doesn't like you very much, he try to support him in every way you can because it's just such a big fan and he wants to support to be better. So that's a really interesting, interesting touch. So I think when when you have the fact that you know you don't have the standard build up, you don't have the antagonist, you don't have the love interest, really it really becomes almost all about the passion the person is trying to beat is himself, is trying to be his old self and to really achieve his goals in this sport he loves, and this fact that it all actually takes a degree of competitiveness out of the sports somehow in the sports movie of this kind. That was really interesting to me. So I just this is one of those and his blockbuster films where I just I can never see a holy be doing anything remotely similar to that. And I agree with my too. It's a lot more similar to what a French film of this kind would be, and that instantly made it more interesting to me. I should say I did not necessarily mean that's as a positive negative. Think it's just different, right. I mean there are plenty of terrible mention or French movie and throvies of of this kind. I would say, yeah, I agree it's unconventional in some ways, but I think the idea, the basic idea you described by or believe in yourself and realize yourself through your passion. I mean that that's not so unconventional. What's unconventional is the way it focuses on that and undercuts it, and I think that's what doesn't it's most interesting and also kind of doesn't always work. And a small point, but I was very confused about what's exactly the competition was. I mean, I guess. I guess raally driving is not big in China and so it's kind of unclear where if they're competing in a national thing, on international thing. I mean it's it's a race in China, but the big champion Guy, he seems to be an international champion. Anyway, I was confused by that. It's very small points, but yeah, but I don't follow race coud driving, but I think it's like the famous in many sports were these kind of events on the tour, and I get in Chinese events often don't get that many international stars. So you probably just have this event where, you know, people get invited, you get wild cards, you get set upside that. That's that's more or less like my reference point for this would be tennis. So that that's how it works there, that you for instance, in the Chinese tournaments, there's usually not that many big western players that come down, and so that that's that's how I translated it to my mind, but I don't know if that's the case. Yeah, yeah, but my confusion was they mentioned he's like a five time champion, the champion of what? I was not oh yeah, I think five time champion of this race, and that's what I think. It was. Okay, okay, and just that there's not everything I like about this movie. I mentioned some negatives already. The one thing that made me like the film a lot less than perhaps otherwise would have is, again, the sentimentality that we've seen in some of these other films were discussing today as well, especially, you know, during the race itself you have, for instance, that crash where someone might have died, and you immediately cut back to a scene where our hero at one point was a teacher training other race car drivers, and this person who crashes one of the students and you probably spend like one or two minutes on this with motivational music, etcetera, in the middle of the race. Those kinds of scenes really didn't work that well for me. They've just understand that they're trying to make us all emotional and care this this character has essentially no build up whatsoever. So I think those kinds of scenes don't work. And we saw them in the wandering work as well, where they want to like when someone potentially dies, you want to, you know, clamb up the music, you have them say something or interacting someone get us emotional. That feels really, really forced, and yeah, that just doesn't work, at least for me. Before we move on to the last famous I just want to add that there is one scene that you guys haven't mentioned which I think is the best scene in terms of the kind of almost aubsurdist comedy, and that's the scene where they go to a mob boss and to to get financing or something and they have to dance, to to sing and dance to to get to get him to agree, and I do think that's the one moment where the tone of the film really really worked for me. But yeah, otherwise the tonal weirdness of the film kind of put me off. I think that's the difference, may difference between us here, that the weirdence work for me. It did work for you. So if you want a slightly weirder sports movie slash blockbuster from China, this might actually be the film for you. And that actually takes us to the very last film we will be discussing today, near Shah, if I am pronouncing that correctly, which is based on a legend that apparently just keeps being readapted and readapted, essentially rebooted even more than spider man. But just to be clear, for this episode we are talking specifically about the two thousand and nineteen animated film which, as I mentioned in our Intro, is actually Shina US highest grossing animated film off All time, and it's placed just outside Ey'd the top hundred of the all time in the national...

...box office. I mean that's just incredible and, as you might expect from this kind of Chinese legend, it's a tale of a force akin to a ying and a Yang that became so destructive that the good and the evil was split, with the evil instantly cursed and set to be destroyed. A little later, the good force is meant to be joined with the newborn child of a royal family, but with some sneakish andnanigans by the film's villains, it is changed, with the evil force leaving the family and the Godly Masters to deal with a child set for nothing but destruction and death, with the question being can this child change what he is? The film has so much from big and possibly even confusing mythology, and at least for US Western viewers, but a lot of focus is actually placed on destiny and your ability to change destiny and and it's just lots of fun, lots of actions at pieces, lots of fighting. Oh and with the sneaky twist you mentioned earlier, there's also an additional child born from dragons, but with the good force, meaning you have essentially a human child with the evil force in them and this child born from dragons which have been banished essentially to hell, with the light force, that you have something darker with the good force inside of it, for just more moral ambivalence, and with these two forces set to clash, leading to a lot of mayhem, a lot of entertainment and again just teller animation so I would absolutely love to hear your takes on Nesha. Like what Chris said, with Naija, the mythology for me was definitely quite confusing, although I did find it a little bit dull also. So I didn't really care to work out what was going on. I mean, I'm not really big into things like spirits, so when the character start rambling on about it, you know my brain just like shuts off. Where the filmed worked for me was as a tale of a child trying to fit in it. So there's some great scenes of him trying to play with others. Whether he realizes that or not, it sort of seems like he thinks it's a big elaborate game of hide and seek. That's some really silly effects that. There's a part where he manages to get the person training to him to kiss a code and that, you know, leads to this over the top allergic reaction which, you know the animation effects were degrade and whatever, but just looks so silly. And there's a lot of like selling us involving this giant overweight pig that keeps popping up. So look, it didn't really do much for me as a comedy or as a story. I didn't think it really went any unexpected directions. He has to like win the trust of the villagers by becoming their savior. I did sort of like the idea that I tried to put together some Woolsha martial arts style training and the mixing of that with the animation, so it's not just one of those like Kung Fu type films, like shore brothers films, with the seven years of eight years where you're learning to train or whatever. They do all these amazing moves. I mean there is that, but rather than having all this wire food work working there, rather when people hanging off while he's doing stunts, able to animate the stunts instead, which is a little bit different and look something. Animation does look great. Stunts aside, I mean there's some really cool glowing lava effects and fire effects in the mix. So, you know, I guess overall, you know, I didn't dislike the film. You know, I thought it was okay, but I us if there was more focused on him as a boy trying to fit in and not being out to fit in, it was less focused on the mysthology, maybe it would have done slightly more for me. Yeah, this one was a big disappointment for me. I mean it's not it's not bad. The animation is quite good, especially the the background stuff that the characters are okay and and the rest is quite good. But I'm generally a much bigger fan of animated fantasy than than you guys are. So I was expecting to like this, this one, a bit more, and yet it's very standard. It's it's if you're looking for Hollywood comparison, it's much more of a dreamworks type of thing than, I don't know, Pix out something a little better. Um. Yeah, by the way, I don't think it's Wosha. I think it's like the gods and demons sub genre, which I think is a bit of different. I don't tend to be an expect but I don't think this quite qualifies as us. However that's pronounced. Yeah, I guess I don't have that much to say about this film. I think maybe the more the more interesting part was that the whole message was...

...to fight against determinism. Right. That's by the big thing, which is a very standard message you would get in a western movie, but I guess it's maybe slightly more subversive in China, because that's not the traditional culture. But I don't know, other than that it's the humor is very broad, like in detective Chinatown, but I guess it's it kind of undercuts the whole high fantasy of it, which is kind of what I tend to like. And Yeah, like Chris mentioned, it's it's a big classic of Chinese literature and apparently there was a him in the seventies which was a really important film for Chinese animation. So I think, if you I kind of feel for the Chinese public which gets this kind of to me it seems watered down version of it. I don't know, I did not really find much of interest in this film, I guess, aside from the quality of the animation. I think I was the one who liked this film the most. I didn't love it and I think don't think it's that bigger step about something like, say, Detective Chinatown. I think that a lot of the comedy is very similar in that it's broad, it's a lot of, you know, just childish tricks, but it still works and I think you know when you have this, you know child who is, like you all mentioned, is playing this large hide and seek with the population. That's terrified of him because he has superpowers and Nichouses may have everywhere around. Those were quite funny. Again, not necessarily Hilarious, and it's definitely not the pixar level, I mean even, you know, the Lesser Pixar level we're getting used to today. It's certainly more, say, average dreamworks level. So not dream works best, but dreamworks is more average, maybe even mediocre productions. But the animation is great. It really creates the world. There's lots of all these fun side characters popping up. I didn't mind the pig at all. I mean it's obviously it's a film for the whole family. There's a lot of, you know, slightly more childish comedy in there, but that that's what you expect, more or less from that kind of film. Um, if if anything, one of the biggest issues, I mean it was the same issue that I think both of you had, which is that the mythology is a little bit confusing, that that's that's obviously just because we're not immersing this. I mean I looked up, you know, the bad guy and the good guy on wikipedia and I mean one of them is actually very well established in Chinese religion. It's interesting to see that and probably they would know these characters instantly. I guess it would be a little bit for like me if they did a story about the tour, not morvel toor but actually like the actual mythological gold tour, and maybe she needs viewers will be very confused by that. I do think that the way they're presenting into there's a lot of details. You know, when this this gold the characters show from the beginning. You get their names pop up and I guess fort and its viewers they would know who these characters are right the way. Obviously we don't. So there's definitely a slight cultural barrier here. But, like soul mentioned that, like the basic plot overcoming destiny and the Basic Fund all of that is solid. It's there, it works and it's done with great animation. So for what it is, I don't have much to complain about. I liked it, but I didn't love it. Just regarding the mythology, I was not confused by it that much. Not that I know it's but but it's actually exactly what I love about this kind of thing. If anything, I wanted more of its right. Yeah, that's kind of the direction I wish the film had gone more into rather than that, you know, the high fency stuff, rather than kind of more standard, well, not the same most endard, but a different kind of standard, I suppose, more comedic focused, adventure tating, which is of course very interesting because absolutely heights the mythology and generally somebody who dislikes mythology and films. I mean we can probably get into that at a separate podcast, but yeah, it's probably least seriously to think to be is where the film starts to go off and starts to explain different things as well its and other things that exist. I didn't think it was quite interesting that Chris mentioned that he didn't mind the peak because, come on, it's it's a family films. Like just imagine, you know that this is like Chris's type of film or whatever. You have this gigantic overwait pig and you know you're gonna make Chris's Day. I'm sorry, Chris, I couldn't help but mention that. That's it. I don't really have a giant, enormous pig for a community effect. It might make my day and I don't know. I mean it didn't quite make my day here, but I didn't have a couple of laughs to see better, at least a couple of smiles, but the big pig did not bother me. We need to get to the bottom of this, this pig hatred that soon has. Clearly I did not think the pig was a huge part of the movie, to be honest. Exactly. Maybe there's some childhood trauma involving a very large nobe peaks? Oh, it's just just the way the pig is animated, and I mean it's not just like fatter whatever, which was like morbidly or beaks. I mean, I mean we can't show a p pictures are in the podcast...

...or ever, but if anybody has seen the films, it's not your average pig and just the way it's white is overpplied for comedic effect. I mean it just seems to be sending quite a negative message, I guess, for these people out there. I don't know. I mean maybe it's just the way I was really good, but I'm just like, you know, this is not funny or whatever to have this like sickly moreably obese pig in there. Okay, that's actually a third point. I mean it is, it is. There is quite a bit of funds shaming, I guess in this film. Not Not so, I mean the pig, I guess, but more so his you know, the master, who has it but was kind of marked for being a drunk and being fat. Yeah, I mean they here you have essentially a master and animal, or I mean the pig is essentially his horse. It's what he rides on, and essentially have a large fat guard riding on a large fat pig, and the master also looks a bit like a pig. So you definitely have that duality comedy going on there. And, like you've seen with detective China Town as well, the comedy and a lot of these these blockbusters is quite broad. I mean that that's the normal Hollywood as well, but I do think that Matia might be quite right in that the comedy is broad in the way that more associate, would say, the two thousands and nineties than with comedists right now. I guess Hollywood might have changed slightly the type of comedy they use. Well, that type of comedy is still very popular in China. That that would be my main takeaway from this, not to say that China is necessarily behind or anything, but that the trends and what type of comedy they use is definitely a little bit different. When I think in terms of animated films. That's still something you see a lot in western films, but generally a film that I'm more family oriented, I think as still just as broad as this is. I'd say it's more of a contrast with detective Chinatown. Right, this kind of movie is not as broad now in western Cinera. But maybe the fact that we're discussing the duality of pig and man is a sign that we should end this episode. I don't know, but I guess this is a slightly shorter discussion that then we might have only done this specific film. But I think that that kind of comments of what type of film it is as well. I mean it is the standard big action animated film. It has all of the classic elements you'd expect. You can probably compare to, say, films like how to train your dragon, but in in terms of quality of probably closer to said that the third film than the first. So I would I would say, like all of us here agree, that animation style here is Great. It's, you know, like the purty clearly paid off Chinese animators know exactly what they're doing. I haven't seen a lot of Chinese animated films. I think the only one I can think of off the top of my head is the monkey king from the sixties, which is, by the way, great film. Definitely recommend that, similar in terms of the fact that it tells quite into mythology. But I'm certainly very interested in seeing more big Chinese animated films just to confirm. I've seen the sixties monkey king film also, and that one actually is, yeah, really cool. It's a bit of a crazy film in this I'm a bit Um strange Asian were unusual sequences, as he is causing havoc in heaven, as the English charable film goes. So yeah, I'd recommend that. In fact I'd recommend that much stronger than Nija. Yeah, definitely. I would certainly recommend the monkeying more than Yessha, and all of the films we discussed in this episode actually just a really, really great film. But now that they're actually, you know, covered these four films in a decent amount of details and they've seen at least four big Chinese blockbusters, I would be interested to know if these have changed your opinions on water and these blockbusters might be and what they have to offer. I wouldn't say my opinion has changed much, even though they were kind of disappointing in some ways. I'm interested in Chinese bobusters as much, well, if not more, than I am in Hollywood blockbusters, but just because they're a bit exotic. I suppose it's a shame that they don't make their way into theaters here. I would love to see some of the big spectacle ones in theaters. That would be great, but in the meantime we'll have to do with with Netflix, I suppose. But Yeah, I'm definitely interested in seeing more of them. I don't know if my opinions really changed much after seeing these four films because, as mentioned at the start, I've seen, you know, a few Chinese blockbusters beforehand. They're not all of them that good. I guess I will continue to seek out Chinese comedy blockbusters because I am a big comedy fan. I still do want to eventually do the is comedy universal podcast because I'm a fairly easier person to get to laugh. So, you know, I generally like, you know, foreign comedies from places such as, you know, Russia and India and whatever, which, you know, some of my co hosts absolutely scorned. So I'm interested in seeing more Chinese our comedies. Not all of them are going to be great, so I mentioned the one goodbye, Mr Loser, was pretty bad, but you most of them are decent and up entertainment. In terms of what I want to seek up more Chinese blockbuster dramas like Pegasus or in Asia,...

Mania's comedy and drama. Probably not, but I will be, I understand, checking out any more comedies from China that ends up succeeding well in the all time box office list. I actually have the opposite reaction to so during that I'm quite likely to check out more Chinese animation films. I'll probably check out more of the Chinese action films as well, but are probably less likely to check out the Chinese comedy films, and I've probably see some of them. I'm definitely interested, but I think detective Chinatown did not wollow me the same way it while my co host in this episode. So and like there's traditionally have not been as big a fan of Chinese or Hong Kong comedies in terms of Um where my perceptions changed a little bit. Definitely, because in different ways. So I would say that the big Chinese blockbuster of the serials like a hero and help flyne diggers. I still think those are better than the ones with disgust today. I guess in some ways I was hoping to see more films like this. They also really enjoyed our writers all the same, which we did not discuss in this episode. So these big action blockbuster and final definitely something I'll keep looking out for and watching. I will say that, off the blockbusters for the last couple of years at least, cliff focus was actually the one that like the most, which is not an action film. It's more of a war film. Obviously a lot of smooth gun action, etcetera, and some spy action. Still has a lot to deliver there, but not quite the type of film that we've been discussing today. But no, I would say that just from this episode and now the fact that I know that these films are so frequently coming to Netflix and other streaming platforms, I will certainly be seeking out far more than these blockbusters than I have before. So that's definitely my big takeaway from this. Just realizing how available these blockbusters are, the fact that they really deliver on the special effects and the animation, just knowing that they are up there with the quality standards of Hollywood and just learning so much more of what to expect from Chinese blockbusters today. That's been, frankly, recently eye opening. I'm very excited to have been just watching watching these, uh, four films and a few others readily closer together. Now I will watch more and UH yeah, I'm very happy we did this episode because I wouldn't have watched these films otherwise or been aware of just how readily available these films were. And, of course, talking images is always readily available on sounder, spotify, apple podcast and wherever you get your podcast fixed, and we are also readily available on I C M for dot com, where we add trendsfer every episode we put out and you can come in there and discuss anything at all with us. Like did you enjoy this episode? Do you think you're completely off the mark to a big very different blockbusters? Are we just completely ignorant on what's and these blockbusters have to offer? I mean, come to I C M forum. Let us know and, as always, thank you so much for listening and join us again soon. You have been listening to the talking images, the official podcast of I C M Forum Dot Com.

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