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Talking Images
Talking Images

Episode 20 · 1 year ago

What Scares Us

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Are you easily scared? In this episode Chris, Matthieu, Lauren and Sol talk us through the films that traumatized them. Hell, Radio even gets a mention!

Listen in to hear the run-down of the scariest movie monsters, not to mention the silliest movie monsters. We will, of course, talk about the scariest films of all time, but beyond that we will try to unpack just what it is about them that scares us.

You are listening to talking images, the official podcast of ICM Forumcom. Welcome back everyone. I'm Chris and today will take my cohost down the dark and treacherous path leading into our deepest sense of self, where we will confront not a were wolf, vampire or the devil, but fair itself. What is it that makes us as humans afraid? What scares us, in other words, is it enough to see a shadow at the distance here, the creaking of the floor, a Russell in the wind, or perhaps nothing at all but darkness hiding the potential, the known or the it take a man or a woman with a knife, shark teeth, the undead, blood duts and Shane Sauce for us to be horrified. Now, be alarmed and alert. We will share some of the most stark and scariest memories and visuals we have experienced. Don't worry, we don't really have the effect or the budget to go overboard send you into a horrifying soundscape, but you may hear some well crafted and quite horrifying and in nerving stories. So, to get this all started, I'll ask my cohout Matua, Lauren and Faul to open themselves up to the world and admit what scares them, what evokes fear in their heart and what makes them jump. It will be personal. Let's just open weight well the most rightforward opening questions you can, and get know our panelss a little bit better. Are you easily scared? Hi, I'm at you from fans. As for being easily scared, I suppose it depends which we call scared. I know people who have very physical reactions in some whole films, like covering their eyes or stuff like that, and that doesn't really happen to me. I do cringe at some violence, especially body parts being removed, but it's very rare for me to feel scared and I sometimes wonder if other people just have another definition of scared that I do, or if experiences with you are the difference. To me, how film is like any other thing. If it engages me, I am with it. I get in its mood, in its rhythms, and for her that means feeling anxious or comfortable. But the only films that make me want to cover my eyes tend to be comedies relying on quench human rather than for which has the opposite effects. Really on me, when it works, because it's captivating right I just can take my eyes off it. High it's old. From Australia. Am I easily scared while watching films? I would say no. Like Matthew, I do sometimes cover my eyes if disturbing things come up. We've talk off disturbing films podcast about how I don't like watching teeth being pulled because of things that happened to me earlier in life. But I'd say well, watching a film I'm not easily scared. I've lesten's under the right conditions, like I'm watching a horror movie. It's late at night, it's pitch black outside and maybe it's a bit windy or so, and then I hear things outside which unsettle me a bit because it's sort of the atmosphere that I've got onto in the film. But if I'm not watching under those conditions, I don't think I'm easily scared while watching a film. I'm actually probably more easily scared when I'm not watching a film. I'm not watching a film, it's reality and I'm watching a film it's escapism. Hello, I'm Lauren, also from Australia. I'm also not very easily scared while watching films. I've never covered my eyes or had to look away or anything like that. In real life I can be quite jumpy and very easily startled, but the worst is like when I'm playing like horror video games I attend to like I'll scream and I'm constantly jumping and getting sweaty and I can't play for more than like an hour because I'm actually just too freaked out. And it be with any horror game yet, watching films, nothing but if I have to react to something in a video game, I'm just she's just so it's a big difference through them having to actually interacted it yourself. Yeah, when you have something jumping out at you and you know it's going to kill you, it's a little bit scarier than I'm just sitting Joan on the couch watching him. Yeah, it didn't think of it, but it's definitely too true for me as well. The video games can be very stressful, really kind of scary and never really play a horror really games. I really give this a try to see if it if it works, I'm not that easily scared the either. I guess you're all...

...been quite in sanitized there, but I do still get caught a certain jump scare. I think that's it's pretty much the same as with the horror games there that if something comes up, that it's an expected this makes it, it can still make me jump a little bit, and that's the same thing in real life as well. Definitely true for me as well. From scares. I guess we'll talk about them later, maybe, but it's hard to say if it's really scared or if it's just a automatic reaction. Yeah, it's just a starful more than a star. Yeah. What's the difference between a startle and a scare? I feel like we're SCA last longer. Yeah, yeah, it's a start is very instantaneous. Yes, a startles more something surprises you. Scare is more so if something as you hooked and as you thinking for seconds or maybe minutes on end, what is going on? Is Somebody out there, and so on. So let me ask you this, then. What's the last film your call? Seeing that made me feel really afraid, really afraid. I'm not sure. I think the only film where, when I can came out of it, I really thought, well, that was pretty scary. Was Not too very original one. It's the shining which I saw in theaters. What I don't watch that to many horror movies and I guess I don't go into them to be scared, so it's not really an experience I have often. So yes, I would say the shining which was actually a few years ago. Yeah, so I'm not very easily scared by watching films. Like I said, it needs to be the right conditions. I do watch the screen franchise once a year for the horror challenge on the pick movies forum, and with the original scream you've got the opening sequence with Drew Barrymore always like to watch that very late at night with all the lights off, because that opening sequence and self actually the incredibly well done and I do find that a little bit unsettling to watch them such conditions. But I guess maybe October last year was the last time that I remember being scared, but that was just for that five or ten minutes stretches, not for the entire film. I can't extrember the last time when I was in constant fear for a large amount of time I watching a film. I don't think that's been any recent films that have, you know, really terrified me, but the last time I remember really being scared was about fifteen years ago when I watched the Holland drive, because when I watched that winkie scene I just felt like the color train from my body. My heart like dropped and when I finished watching the film, I like got up and my knees were like still shaking. But that was the last time I can remember like really being just like totally shut wow. That's some experience there. I can't really remember any recent film either that really really horrified me. I did see one Soviet film from that night, Eighty seven recently, called Mr Designer, which has a really unnerving finale which kind of tests, not the spoiling thing, but it kind of loops the same thing over and over again with this extreme light and extreme contrast and makes you feel really uneasy. But I'm not sure if that feeling counts. That's horrified. So if I would have to look at films that really horrified me and when most player memory of that, I would have to go back several years to probably anguish, which I know we talked about in a previous podcast as well, I think in our Spanish horror episode, because it's set in the cinema. These people are watching a horror movie, but then that horror movie starts to interact with their reality as well, and something really extremely uneasy about seeing a film where things from that film is coming to life. I think there's a difference between being horrified and being scared. There's a lot of films with some really freaky imagery out there and some really out there imagery, things like a body mail, the Australian horror film outside that are fine, but it's not very and I think there's a bit of a difference there. I definitely agree. I think if I was going to say things that were perhaps horrifying, I could mention, you know, that I seen in some Beto for instance, or you know any to torture porn films where essentially just see skin come off, like I really don't like blood that much. I can definitely feel it easy by that, but you know, I wouldn't be scared. Something else that was thinking when you were talking, Chris, is those films you mentioned where you seeing them at him or in the cinema, because for me every film I can think of that was kind of scary for this question would be in theaters. I think it's much more powerful Oh, yeah, agree completely. Not Now. Unfortunately, I didn't see either of them at the cinema and I would have loved to see anguish at the cinema, especially the first time, because any would be sitting there just as these characters in their seat and start to realize that something is terribly, terribly wrong and that essentially it's mimics itself and it mimics itself and you would potentially feel part of that same loop and be drawn...

...in completely. So I can definitely see that being genuinely horrifying. It's interesting is that I think I actually disagree with that. For me, the film's usually scarier if I'm watching it at home because I'm watching at home and watching it alone, without anybody else there. If I'm watching a film in a theater, especially if it's path full of people, it's very easy to to realize or be aware of the fact, be conscious of the fact that you're watching a film as if you're watching at home, without into structures from people talking or rustling popcorn or anything. I think it's easier to get lost in a film if you watch her home under the right conditions. It's probably a discussion of another podcast and I don't do a podcast on watching a higher versus watching in cinema at some point when it's kind of the film tourism podcast over them again, I guess. I guess I get lost much more easily in in the cinema than a tomb. that. Yeah, so it would be the really. That's funny, but I think it's also depends a little bit what the film is about and what's is the pig thing, and I'm going to talk about anguish. Their horror is the many ports and said in the cinema. If watching something like scream, where someone is alone at home, I think that's probably more horrifying if you're at home. I remember from the disturbing episode solve that you or someone else brought breathings of yours in swimming pools or when people are swimming. But I think it too perhaps really depends on what's actually being the pick that as well. The thing also comes to mind. I mean it's literally about watching the video. That's would hurt you. And then I never see him again. Actually, this is what I was thinking about. To it plane movies and seeing films are playing clashes on the plane like it's probably a sex similar kind of worth. I think I heard that they like banned those kind of things, like any any sort of plane crash in a film. It can't be. I think so. Yeah, maybe not all, but I think so. Yeah. The question is, do they band gravity on the international or space station? Maybe some of them bring it in on my laptop just to throw everybody else. I was going to say that I sort of agree with soul that being at home is definitely the environment for being scared more than in a cinema. It's definitely more immersive and you're in the comfort of your own home. I think no matter what the film content is, in a cinema and too aware of watching a film and at home, that comfort I have is more likely to be interrupted or disrupted by a scare and a horror film. And also you have things like, you know, you hear something outside the window or something like that that can increase the fear. Do you guys watch horror films in order to be scared? Like it with that good in mind, because it's it's not the case for me, and I know that many people complain about some modern horror films that's they're not scary enough. But I guess I just watched them like any other films, so I was wondering. I don't think I watch horror films to be scared. I mainly like horror films because they pushed the limits of what's possible. I really like horror, sci fi and fantasy, I guess, almost about equally in the right way, because they present very different types of stories with an unlimited scope. Apair to something like a prison drama, the journeys so many stories that can be told about like a Weston, there's only so many stories possible, whereas something like horror has got an infant number of possibilities. That's what really attracts me to the genre. Yeah, I'm it's so like I care more about the themes and the ideas. I don't go into be scared and I treat sort of every film equally, like I go in letting that film give me its experience, not expecting one. Well, I think I completely disagreed that horror films are have far more in limited field most of the SOUNDRAS, but I do agree that I don't necessarily want horror films to be scared. I do think that they can create a sense of earn these or the best horror films can make you afraid or make you feel very, very uneasy, which it's obviously a very immersive experience and can be absolutely fantastic, and that's something that they are not alonelydoing. But one of the main sons I can do. Obviously thrillers and if you're the funders can move there as well, but hors relatively untouched in that degree. But no, I watched them as most of the films and quite a few horror films aren't really that scary either, so they will still be. You know, they've done all the regular metrics for me. Okay, it's interesting, Chris. I would have never thought to call horror a limited genre. It's just so many strands of it out there, from on two movies to the supernatural. I know, the terial killer one or the slasher subgenre in itself is quite limited it. If you think about all different types of horror...

...films out there, I think it's an infinite universe of possibilities, which I just don't get that from any other genres. Well, I didn't say they were limited. They said that I didn't think that they have more ability to be the worse than any other genre. You can even have horror rests. You can have sci fi resterns. None of them have been good yet, but having a few examples, so I think almost anything I can go to a limited amount of directions. Obviously some subfounders, like prison dramas or specific slasture films, maybe it slightly more limited that. I think almost those unders have the potential to theoretically go anywhere they want it. Okay, I guess I can agree with that. Or genres do have unlimited possibilities, I suppose. Maybe it's more the case that with horror I sing or make more often going for the less possibilities, compared to something like Western's or prison films, where it's very standard. What's going on. Yeah, I think that's perfectly fair. And to move on to my next question, because you talked a lot about being scared by films, which most of us don't appear to be that often. But what was the last time you remember being scared in real life and what scared you? Again, depends on what you come scared because I don't really know. Being anxious is a pretty common feeling, of course, or this for me, but really scared it's harder to pinpoint. The only thing that comes to mind that tree was a few years ago I was skiing too fast and got to the top of a sloop and I jumped, I guess without intending to, and that was pretty scary, but not exactly something that's real. We dates to horse in the mouth match. It's really the only thing I can think of at this recently and was the last time I was scared and real life, like to say a few minutes ago when the audio wasn't working in discord and that was really skipped. Don't know what was going on, for I was in one of the unfriended films for a moment. All kidding aside, probably the most recent time scared in real life is last night. It's very windy around here at the moment. It got some very strong weather and yeah, just the trees blowing around and the wind and rustling and sort of making noises on the roof and the walls outside, it's, sorry hard to get to sleep and I've always had trouble getting to sleep and having noises outside takes it no easier. And it's not just have to rationalize to myself. It's not somebody trying to break in or it's not the house collapsing or whatever after a lot of rustionalization. But no, I definitely get scared. I'd offer that night and I need a rationalize it with myself, sort of like self talk it through to recover from that fear. And that's something which is more scary for me than most films that I'd watched in a single year. Cat Remit really remember a time in real life where I was like really, really scared. But but I have similar moments to so, like I have a real problem with windows, especially at night, and sometimes if I get up in the middle of the night and go to the kitchen, I'd like start my hairs will start standing up, but I have to run back to my bedroominitely good, but that hasn't happened a while. And I mean I get like like when I'm driving and there's like a close call. That's probably the most scared that I'll get. I actually sometimes look at my my fitbit heart rate later and you just see this massive spy which is pretty fun by boys. I just get sort of like easily startled. But the she like half an hour ago, I didn't hear my boyfriend come out of his room and he says something to me. Now I must fell over actually like true fear. I don't even know if I've ever had like that kind of real life terror. That does an interesting point law and the kind of real life terror. I do think I had the actual terror at one instance in my life because I was threatened with a broken bottle by a stranger on the street that was clearly intoxicate, that in the middle of the night. For that that was probably a moment of quite a bit of real terror. But outside of that, no, I don't really think I felt real terror before. In terms of recently there are calls and jump scare. So you know, if I'm out walking and stop and suddenly a dog whins this jumping against the window next to me, I might jump, but it's no kind of gear. Once, though, I think this is the longest I've been getting in the horrified. Was a few years ago in Tumbria when my wife and I ever driving back to the House we had rented over a mountain and suddenly got really, really fuggy, so we couldn't see anything at all and this mountain had no lights whatsoever and we had to go down a really, really steep to way road that was barely big enough for one car and which was, by the way, not straight. It was just changing everywhere and you could drive off and into fields, were off, not...

...quite off cliffs, but you know, go off road really easily. So essentially we just moved down that road. I'd probably like five kilometers an hour or something like that. Like you should have taken us five ten minutes to get back to the house because that's what the sudden gps but we spent forty fifty minutes just getting down that hill, just peering over trying to see where the edges of the road we're going he was. That was pretty scary. That's a very rational scare when you were genuinely in danger. Yeah, I really hope that doesn't happen again. And for home's really careful about the Farg myth and driving at mountains at night from my mom. But I point out out because I think it's kind of an interesting distinction between being scared for you rish because you actually endanger like auld. Surely you mentioned the guy with a block and butt one right, as opposed to being alone in your room at night and you know scared because it's just kind of a spooky atmosphere. That's not something really specific sick. so that's reason scares. But let's try to go back a little bit in time to when they were all far, far more impressionable. Very scared as a child, and do you remember what you were scared of? The different instance believe there were monsters under your bed there in the classt where you're looking for monsters and you're walking down the street at night. What scared you as a child? How easily scared were you as a child? The only times that I remember being really scared would be when I was at home alone and my parents had gone out of my brother wasn't home and I'll hear noises and I think that somebody was trying to break in. I grew up watching the home alone films and I think watching home alone, and home alone too so often, just really got something into my system that you know, there's always going to be people trying to break into your house. So I definitely remember released one time where I just went into a room where I could feel inside a closet. I just sat there and read a book until my dad came home because I was just that freaked out that there might be somebody trying to break in and get into the house. I don't ever recall being scared of monsters under my bed or vampires or on bees or any of the horror creatures. The only fears I remember growing up real life possibility fears, if ones that were delivering in a comedy. They have definitely made it on pressure on me in my life and even in my adult life, like I was saying before, but I get scared at night. It's those sort of deposed fears that are the surface in me. So I definitely remember being scared as a child. Again, it's sometimes had to distinguish between anxious and scared, like you're scared of your first day school. That's not really what we think of as scared as adults. I think the closest thing and the one that would happen the most would be waking up in complete darkness and really having no idea where I was, even though I was in my room, and spending what fect like eternity looking for things around me and making my way to the light or to the door. It did happened to me once while camping. That was actually less scary because you immediately have people around you, which anchors you more than if you're learning you hoo, I think I was definitely afraid of the dark as a child, so I wasn't exactly conscious of it. That one point I started always sleeping with the stores open, and actually I still do it to this day, and imagine on some level it was to avoid this situation of being in complete darkness. Yeah, I was also scared of the dark when I was a kid. Actually would sleep with my door open and the whole way light on until like my late teens, but now I like complete darkness. So I don't know why that changed, but I like I grew up with horror films because my dad liked horror films. So films never like most of them didn't really scare me, but most of my traumatic moments half and there's a kid from certain horror films. But then if they the traumatize me so much, then I just keep rewatching them over and over. Of course, it's like some of the most traumatic ones were like the shining miniseries. There's like the true seventeen scene, and I'm still actually like, I don't like baths with shower curtains if they're closed. I actually, I can't go near them and I used to have to always open up the curtains when I went in the room because I couldn't doable. And it's a segment in the film Campfire Tales where it called people can lick to and basically there's a guy under the bed looking the girl's hand, and I ever since I can't sleep with my my feet or my hands outside of the blanket or over the bed. It's still so this day. I just haven't. And then there was another film that like made me cry out of pure fear, but I'll leave that for a later question. Fair enough. One question, though. I think the other DAS answer that, since these things still traumatize you. But did returning through those films help...

...in any way? did seeing them again, especially at the stay old rage perhaps decreased a fair when I was a kid? I don't think it did. Like I would just keep rewatching them over, I would even just rewatch the scene just to like relive the fear, and it would be like the same every time. But at an older age. They don't affect me like that at all. But it's just the little things like the shower curtains and the limbs hanging out of the bed. That I still can't do. That's where it originated, but now, when I watched them, I'm just like a that's really interesting. I have a similar story. It was this back back in the early sh I was a very young child. Somehow I heard this really silly, ridiculous horror story for children with. I don't know the purpose of this, maybe to get them to hurry up at the toilet or something like that, but there was a story about the toilet drag. Exactly what was the story of the Toilet Dragon? Rich would the come up of the toilet and the drag you in and four years after that I remember just always checking the toilet before I set out to make sure there wasn't a partlet dragon there. And the funniest thing is that somehow, unbeknowst me, this was such a famous clip that they played it again in high school and I could hear it. They heard how ridiculous it was, which made me feel really embarrassed. To jump back just on hall of films. When we were kids, I didn't watch them because I didn't really watch films in general, but I have a memory of hearing some friends talk about the exorcist when I has like ten and I did not want to watch it. I remmber being very relieved to learn that it was technically forbidden under twin, so that I had an excuse not to watch it. So you're essentially scared just by hearing about I feel yeah, exactly. Description of its sounded too fine. So so, yeah, this is fantastic. The first you have the actual films that they have the radio and now we have this description. So that's the brilliant and I still haven't seen it's I mean it's definitely a huge go. We have that. Can See that consists to read this in the first Bob, but that's mostly because it doesn't really have that great reviews. In the third exorcist film was really good, certain by William Peter Black Lee did the wrote the first film. I'll define working on the third film. The second one didn't do much for me at the time. The first one I've gone back and forth on. I don't think it deserves to be the number one film. One that they shoot zombies are sorry for that, Lauren. I think it's a grey as horror film of all time, but it's a film that I've warned a bit more after the years, after calling off on it for a little bit. Yeah, I don't think it should be number one either. I mean it's okay, but yeah, but it's addictive measurement, disint it's which is praised them ast. I'm still stuck this finding. It's an objective asure men, but it's based on the formulas that Lauren and Chris put him and they're working out. So they could like change the formulas and rig it. I wanted to be Reagon. No, but I'm pretty sure certain that exorcist was still be number one. It's got in by far the most less. It's got a lot more points than the shining. So sadly, I think it's going to be trying. Used to be trying. Used to be number one when I first registered, and I seem the shining was number one. Yeah, it was number one on the first edition, but we completely changed everything for the second edition and go a lot more list and yeah, exasist just flew ahead. You need to search from all list that have got the shining on it and not the exist on it. You guys know this is being recorded, right, I'm going to be we have a record of soul specifically trying to decide the posts. It's all good to telling without the proved not sabotage and proving yes, improve it. And by the way, that's Chris Reynold's, not me with the other participants. Oh, yes, sorry, yeah, you're just a clarify. Yeah, but you're so let's get a little bit back on track again. What would you say are your biggest or deepest fears in real life, and do they actually impact the films you watch? For instance, if you are really afraid of the dark, the films taking place in the dark scary more. If you're scared of sharks, the it's doth more terrifying. You have an examples of real life fears that have really affected in my viewing when I guess nothing very specific. I just don't. I don't have any very specific fears in life. The think I'm afraid of is, I think, something everyone has to a certain degrees. That I'm afraid of. This the inevitability of its the notion of not existing, and it's, you know, it's to the point that, and I think many people do this, it's just even thinking about it's...

...even try not to and they try to distract myself from it and I think it does impact the things I tend to watch, the whole things I tend to enjoy more. I do like existential horror generally more than maybe more traditional ones, and so I think I guess that's my answer, but that's really interesting with you, because that definite have been more of us my answer as well. I think at one point called to active in New York the scariest film of all time. The actually I was thinking of the latest Charlie Goffman Film. I mean you haven't seen it yet, I think, but there is any months. Not yet. I'm really looking forward to it. I haven't seen the new Charlie Corse and film yet, or hopefully will by the time this podcast is released, because I've got lined up as the first film to watch for the horror challenge this year. That I am definitely scared of death and, like Matthew, I try and avoid thinking about it as much as possible because whenever I do I get very depressed. Think I try and avoid films that are actually about people wanting to die, just because I find that so scary. But most of those are horror films funds about people have suicidal thoughts or want to die because they've lived for such a long time already or because I've got a terminal disease. Those don't really tend to be horror films in terms of what scares me, as I've said before, our home invasion, people trying to break in. I do, I guess, gravitate a bit towards those films sometimes times, because those ones can be very scary if they are done a world. We already discussed, I think one of the art podcasts mother I Darren Aronofsky, and that's definitely one on the album. Sort of home invasion thing will people coming into and breaking stuff in your home. So definitely stuff like that resonates with me a bit more. I don't know much I actively seek it out, but something like that's going to be ten times more scary for me the latest of Vampire or Zombie or whatever film Monts to the week film out there. That's a fantastic point, Sol and I'll actually completely a lot of my mother. If we describe and eve being comfortable and feeling a nerve as scared, that mother is definitely developed the scariest films of all time. They'll perhaps not under the traditional definition. Yeah, I don't know. I felt scared while watching it, but I guess it in a different sort of way. Well, Mother didn't really impact me at all. But up until a few years ago and thinks, I was really scared of the things like hurricanes and big storms, things like a flood or fire or burglary, like something ruining my home and my stuff. But yeah, the last few years I've gotten increasingly more scared by like death and, you know, like not existing anymore or the people around me not existing anymore, and also things like you're in dementia and schizophrenia and watching people around you like die or lose their identity. I'm not sure it really impacts on what I choosed to watch or what I'm scared of, although I am drawn towards any film where there's like a big storm, things sort of happening, and I actually am drawn towards films where people are dying of a terminal illness or dealing with that kind of thing. But yeah, they usually not horror films, but I don't think I'm really scared by them in horror films as such, just in my life. When I think about him. That actually be really interesting. To See, because I think you're right, you don't really see that in horror that much, but seeing terminal illness or seeing it that kind of existential horror could work incredibly well. I would really like to see some horror directors or other directors trying to do something more horrifying with these topics. I think that would be really interesting in something that's not really done, or at least not done that often. But to make this a little bit less personal again, let's look at one of the main differences in being scared, as we talked about a little bit there jump scares versus anticipation. So we're talking about those quick little shocks where you know it might be a cat jumping out of a window or it might just be slow brooding, tension building up, or perhaps the knowledge that the killer or whatever deadly rap is set up is right around the corner. which do you think has the most effect on you? When me, I guess I would not necessarily think of them as fundamentally different things, because I think jump scares work the best when they are preceded by good anticipation, and I don't really mind Jim scares personally. Maybe it's because I don't watch. That's many half Ms. I watch some and so even though they are over used today, maybe I don't see them that often. So it's fine for me. But certainly anticipation is for me to Keey to what horror is. When I think of the shining, for example, as being very scary, I don't think of like the moment...

...where you see the twins. I think of when the boy is riding his tricycle in the corridors right. I think of what's before the reveal because, and we maybe talk about that more, but whatever you can imagine is always going to be scarier, almost always going to be scarier than whatever the filmmaker can show you. I'm not a very big fan of jump scares. It's got to the stage with most modern Hollywood horror films where sort of expected it be jump scares in this. So it's startling but it's not scary because it's the formula these days. have jump scares and everything suddenly pop out out. Say, anticipation, if it's done well, can be very good. If you've got a powerful music store, and I guess jaws is the best example that were slowly building up the tension. That's probably more ancestling. I don't know if it will be necessarily scared Arey. I guess what would be most scary for me is when there's just something unknown, something weird going on and you're not sure I or how or that's exactly going on. So if you just sort of might notice something creeping up on the corner of a frame and it's not a jump scarce, just something happening in the background. I'm just thinking of the Movie The Mothman Prophecies, although I actually I might come back to that one later on. That's got some good stuff for the monster in there, so you might maybe or go into that now. But you're jump scares. A not a big fan of anticipation like better. I prefer just the things which is just noticeable in the corner of the frame. I think that's much scarier than either, and it occurs. Yeah, I don't really like jump scares that much and usually, like if I start watching a film and it's just jump scared after jump scare, I just get bored and I'm like, you know, they're just relying on this to make the movie move forward rather than putting anything in there. But I think there are tool so they can be used effectively if they get the you know, the anticipation and the tension right, but generally they're not the things that are remember about the film. They're not they don't have any lasting impact for me and sometimes I find they use really badly and they break up like this great tension to the point where it's like distracted, distracts you from the atmosphere that they've worked to build up. So it's like why, why did you ruin that whole moment? So I definitely prefer films that are really like filled with dread. For me, it's like that that you know, that lingering on something that's we're weird or unnerving and not putting in your face, but would like I'd so said like in the corner of the frame, in the background, it's just something there that's strange or not obvious, may be necessarily straight away, but it's enough to kind of put you off. So yeah, that feeling that it's they're just lingering, I think, is what I definitely prefer. Ever, a jump scare? No, I think I agree completely with that. Now, like we mentioned earlier, jump scares are one of the main things that will probably get the closest to scare me using scaring are quotes a little bit, but that they're one was that you know will start to you, even though they can be quite silly and break the tension. Yeah, I do think anticipation tends to work the best. The problem with anticipation in a lot of horror films, though, is that you're not that emotionally connected with them. So I think this might have been why some horror films worked more on me in the past, when we get more involved in, say, the specific characters. These days, when I watch for films, you have to actually develop those characters quite well for me to care. Maybe in this becoming a little bit less sympathic, but do you think that if you actually care about the character, then you will get more scared because you will really dread something happening to that person? But if that's not the case, then most of the than Pitt anticipation won't really work. I mean, you said an example that's not from a horror film, but it's slightly related because it's Alfred Hitchcock. There's I'm not going to mention and which film it is, but there's a relatively famous scene and one of the early rounds from Hitchcock where he has a child and knowingly carry a bomb and sit down on a bus and you follow that scene knowing that this kid may or may may die, and I think since this built up so much time caring about this child, think the impact and the anticipation works so much, much better. So yes, if anticipation if done well, all the way for me. But it's the whole thing between surprise and suspense, right. That's a whole example hitchcock always gives with the with the bomb. I actually didn't know it was in one of his films. Haven't seen that one. But Hitchcock also uses a lot of like stairs, stairs are in a bunch of horror movies and it makes sense, right. It's just a free anticipation to because you don't know by definition what's at the end of it. And I guess anticipation in a way leads us or to my next question as well, which is more about mood and psychological horror. Is it possible for or do you actually get scared...

...or an easy by just the atmosphere of the film, of what the film is building up, by perhaps the musical elements, by even the cinematography, the shadows, the shades, the experience is watching it, even with nothing scary happening at that point in time. Well, yeah, to me that is basically what home is. As I mentioned earlier. I don't watch movies to be scared and I can think of a wolf in it doesn't really from me early on. Mood and where it wouldn't be the main elements that I think of it. If we mean psychological or it generally more effective for me, because it's anything that's internal, right, like people losing their mind, as we mentioned. That's something that's really efficient for me and it's done something I necessarily think about in life. But yeah, film that features character that are doubting their own reality. That's what is most effective and that's is generally all done to mood. I don't actually have a lot to add on to this. I agree with what much of what Matthew has said. Films about characters down in the reality is definitely by nerving, more so than a more conventional horror film or a monster movie would be, and I do think that cinematography and music are very key elements in making and affective horror film and definitely something that's got rules of moon and atmosphere is more likely the work for me, rather than something which just has monsters jumping out from the corner of the frame. I think it really needs to be built up cinematically to be interesting for me. Yeah, I don't think I have much to add on this either, but I was going to say that even just psychological elements in any film, like, you know, like a Zombie film, the horror isn't the zombies. The horror is the people, which might be like maybe a little bit generic these days or whatever, but like that's what I'm interested in more like I don't really care about the monsters at how how do people react to the situation and how did they like deal with the internally? It's not really looked into in depth with a lot of monster movies, but that's usually what I'm more interested in on that and I do like films that are really Moody and atmosphere, but I find it really difficult to connect to that with a lot of films. I don't know it's just me or just the films I'm watching, but definitely like films with really effective sound design or music, like like Susperia, the original film. Well we can piss off so little bit then men. Hey, I don't know what's gonna say, but okay, but were they? I think it's interesting how different the sound design and the visuals for a horror film will quite often be. This from the get go you always know that you're watching a horror film and if you look at things like with someone, and I guess it's quite easy things to do, it shouldn't be particularly impressive, but it takes around forty plus minutes, especially in the director's cut, until you get to anything truly horrifying. But you still feel unease throughout those first forty minutes simply because of the sound design, the muted emotions, just how you know when a key drops on the table it's slightly louder. So it's just the way to build up mood and get you into the atmosphere off watching that a horror movie and knowing that it is the nerving and feeling and Erve even before anything thing happens. So I think that's definitely something that a lot of horror movies do really well and it's something that definitely separate horror from of other thunder it. Just to be clear, I don't dislike midsummer and I didn't dislike hereditary either. It's just like dislike people saying, you know, it's one of the top five films the year, because I think it was a silly below that. I did love the murder atmosphere in midsummer. I love the upside down cinematography, the sound design. Yeah, it was excellent. There was actually the story and the way the narrative went which underwhelm me. Just kind of interesting, because I thought I might also just mentioned Mandy, the recent film with a class cage in it. That's a film with a very arresting sound design. When I watched that in theaters, the cinema walls were actually vibrating because of the sounds and it's got very striking visuals. Again, that was a film where the narrative underwhelm even though it had all the right atmosphere elements to be in a very effective horror film. I definitely agree with you all points, Chris. Do I don't know that I would pick Misama to illustrate it, because you might have forgotten maybe about the first thing in me, to my it's pretty pretty horrific stuff. But Anyway, I think I agree with the idea that mood is maybe the essential building block of horror, and I think when proof of that is how people use traders and we cut them to be horror films, or sometimes we cut horror films to become it's I I think you it's just how you present something right. Well, I think you're absolutely right there.

So easy to this. By tweaking the music a little bit, everything changes. So it's definitely hands up to all of the sound designers working on horror films and working everywhere. It's also in the editing, I think. I mean definitely the music, the sound design, absolutely, but I think the editing is also you can recognize power editing take, even though this ties in with both building the mood and anticipation. Let's talk a little bit about monsters and get into the time all debate. Is it scarier to see the monster or let the imagination fill in the blanks? I definitely prefer not seeing the monster as much as possible. It's not a firm that. My favorite episode of Doctor Who is one that's called midnight, and the whole point of the episode is that it's a bottle episode, so it's people stuck in some sort of transport with something rattling around outside and influencing people inside, like making them big before the people say the same thing, changing their behaviors generally in ways that are kind of disturbing, and that is, I think, super effective. With the question of whether it's Sarria to say the monster or not say the monster, I would say a lot of it depends on the monster I will designed. It is in general uds most films, the more scarier, where you don't see the monster in your mind fills in the blame. There obviously are some films out there with some really free key and out their imagery in which you know it's actually good to be able to see the monster. So in general, odds saying no, I prefer not to see it, but my imagination work over and wonder what's going on. Obviously are some really great monster designs over the years. So a lot of it just depends on how well this I guess also how necessary it is for the plot, because sometimes you don't actually need to see the monster to be able to get what's happening in the film, but sometimes it's like the culmination or everything else. So it is sort of effective to see it. So that's my runabout way of not properly answering the question. My answer was going to be similar to souls. I don't really have a preference and I think it's just entirely dependent on the film and what it's trying to do and all that kind of stuff, because I think that a lot of the things that scared me and horror films as a kid was one that the build up of the tension and the anticipation, but the thing that cemented that was the reveal. So I think of things like the shining. It's the moving towards that shower curtain that's scary, but if it cut just before that curtain was opened, I probably would have just completely like forgotten about it. It wouldn't have mattered at all. Things like the alien, in Alien, if the scenes without at work, but if we never saw it, it would probably get really annoying. And then I think of other films like I don't like them, but feels like paranormal activity and bird box. If we saw the monster they would be completely ruined and they wouldn't work at all. And for me the thing that really breaks the immersion with the monsters is when it over explained, not so much overseen. I hate those on let's go to the library and research the origins of this creature and let's explain everything about it and how the defeat it, and that's when I like, I don't care about the monster. I think you hit the nail on the header, Lauren. Think that the way to really go with most horror films is you just have anticipation, building up to it and leave a lot to the imagination. So I think that if you don't know what the monster will do, where it is at any given point in time and you have perhaps fear of what they will look like as well, and with then a fitting or real I think that's far more effective than either showing it all the time or never showing it. There are some films where not showing it works, and especially in films with lower budgets, to definitely think about this, because obviously you think monsters that doesn't look quite that great can hurt the film severely. But if you do have the design to actually show the monster, especially if it's, you know, cold it in the dark, I think that's when it really hit the mark in terms of making itself as scary as it can. Be. I've got an interesting example to maybe think about in terms of seeing the monster and not saying the monster. I'm thinking of the Predator movies, especially in the one thousand nine hundred and eighty seven original better to movie that one over there. The aldim is invisible, Judea's cloaking vice for the vast majority of the film, and yet we see from thermal vision, from the adiens point of view, what's going on. The characters get attacked without being able to see their attacker and then, without spoiling we do later on see the monster. I think that one strikes a good ratio in terms of how much we see him we don't see. But it's interesting one because the invisible attacker is obviously quiet and effit to horror character to have in their or horror antagonist. A you got one. Are the thoughts that you guys have on Predator and maybe the Predator series in...

...general? I'm a big fan of the first Predator. I don't really like any of the sequels or remakes or reboots or whatever. And Yeah, I think that one is a good example, as it's the monster is choosing to be invisible rather than just the filmmaker's choice of making the monster invisible. So it's interesting that it's the part of the character to not be seen, but I don't really think of it as scary. Like I think of that as an action sci fi film, not a horror film at all. So, yeah, welieve that that wasn't really scared during Predator. I think it's a good film, but it's not the film I particularly love either. But the Predator was quite effective when I haven't seen the putator, but in the recent example of what sort he's talking about, maybe the invisible man right the twenty twenty film it's using, when it's using that idea might of the invisible attack. I really like it, but I you guys don't. Now I want to say it. I've actually got it lined up as my second movie to watch the horror challenge after I finished watching and Charlie Kufman films. So I've got that actually lined up to watch next month. Yet there nothing either, unfortunately. Yeah, I thought it was okay and I think there were like some moments that did really well and playing on that, you know, not being able to see the monster and not knowing if it's really there or not. Just those like little little hints that let us know. But she's still not quite a hundred percent sure. But I think it really loses its way in the second half. But the first heart half pass some like really good moments of like fear, I guess. Not Not enough to get me completely, but some really well done moments in there. And I think to get back at what you were saying earlier alone about there being a payoff right, example with the shining and walking toward the shower. Yes, definitely agree that if there's nothing there it's not going to be worth anything. Right the tension. It's just not it works in the moment but you're not going to remember it. But so maybe where I think is most effective often is to have the monster clearly do something but yet not seeing very clearly. I think just very obviously eas are often disappointing, and especially because Hor uses not to visual effects and as we know, visual effects can get old pretty quickly. Recently I was watching look back to the LOO. That's but the hood of the Wolf, and I mean it's not really hard of him. It has her elements, but there's a monster in it and at the start that don't show it too much and that's great, and then they show it and it's not Exi well, I agree with that completely. Actually, I do think it's a relatively effective horror film in the classic way, like this is what diout qualified as a back in the Turkeys and fourties, and it's done in very nice way. It's quite well directed, an actor, et Cetera as well. But that, once the monster actually gets in there is a slowly loses its grip a little bit. So now that it decided that it's usually past to see the monster at least a little, what would you say is the scariest movie monster of all time? So, by choice is actually a very recent one, and that is the bear in an elation, not exactly how movie, just to film with some her elements. It actually I don't know how to picture it really, because what is scary about it is all about the sound design. But those who don't know the film at own it's about this alien life form, I guess, which shows up on earth and which slowly kind of changes things around it, and so it's kind of mixing stuff like veget or life with animal life and stuff like that. And so that's this pair which I won't get into why, but it has when it when it shrieks, when it screams, it is a mix between bear and a human voice and that is absolutely chilling. So for scariest movie monster, and I guess I'm wild, the great at all was to see the monsters. Sometimes, I don't know, I've got a bit lost in the conversation there. And in terms of scary movie monsters, I don't find movie monsters in general be that scary. I find, as I was saying, things like home invasion, breaking the people's homes, serial killers a bit more scary because it's more real and down to Earth. And terms of movie monsters, I do really like the Mufman prophecies. I mentioned that before in the podcast earlier on the muthman prophecies. What's the key thing with the creature there is that you don't know what it's motives are. Like it keeps appearing. I'm seen the movie for a few years but like, monster keeps appearing but you're not sure what's going on or what's it trying to. Not necessarily an evil intent in there. It's just the unknown attent and I think the unknown is much scarier, much scarier to have a strange looking creature or unusual creature, not know whether it's going to be benevolent or whether it's going to try and attack you, rather than having something out there where you know it's definitely going to attack you no matter what. The unknown, I think, in general,...

...is much more scary and it would be great, I think, if we had more monsters that were like that, where you are just not sure how it's going to add or what it's motives are. Yeah, I can't really think of any specific monsters that affectively like that, but I also prefer ones where you just not quite sure of what they are. I don't know if I have a favorite or scariest movie monster, but I was also going to mentioned the bear from annihilation. I didn't really go crazy on the film, but that there and that scene was just insane. But I was trying to think of like what kind of movie monsters that I'm drawn to and I generally like. I like ones that either you're not quite sure of them or that they're like absolutely relentless. So it's something like the Blob and also things like nature, where it's not sentient, and things like the nothing in the Nether and thing story or the Langaliers, which basically like eat the world. I found those really scary as a kid, and I also like creatures that look human or our human noise, but are really alien in the humanness. So things like Pinhead or pyramid head from Silent Hill, where they they look human but they don't quite act human, or even like the creeper and jeepers, creepers, where you like you know that they're not human, but it's, I don't know, sort of almost like an uncanny sort of element there, and I think I don't know if it would count as a monster, but I think if if I had to pick the scariest, it would be the whatever it is in it follows, and I think it sort of has both of those things where it is kind of relentlessness and the alien humanness, because it's literally presenting itself as humans but they're slightly off. And that film as well, I think, is definitely one of the scariest recent films, or at least, like you know, one of the ones where you just sitting on the edge of your seat, can't frozen in fear. So that if I could pick that as a monster, probably go without one. It's in Resh thing about relentless monsters, cause I guess if it's a monstertial, relentless it is going to be scary. With slashes, though, I don't like the relentless killers and slashes very much because you get someone like by Cormiers or Jason Voye's and no matter what you do to them, they always stay alive and then never dies. There's never any real tension there. I guess we're a monster. is slightly different with human antagonists. I don't find them very scary when they're relentless, especially because you know Jason Michael a talk at all. There's no real like, I think, really in there, just a presence in there. Much prefer Freddy Krueger because at least he taunts his victims. There's something else going on there. I think that's part of what to make the it puts monster work really well. It's that it makes sense, but that it is we didn't this. It's baked into the premise. It doesn't really diminished the reality of the film like it can before slashes. Yeah, I was going to say I didn't. I don't like the Slasher, human killer type of thing either, like I don't like any of them. Definitely prefer Freddy Krueger over them because he has personality, but he's not scary because he's kind of likable, whereas the others are just kind of boring. So I prefer that relentlessness in things like, you know, like a wild animal like Coujo or got the name of the film, but the one whether the couple was attacked by the bear. So yeah, forces of nature or, you know, alien creatures that are relentless and strange, rather than humans going a head stock is the best hollow doctor. Look claim a sure this that because betok, okay, okay, but I think I agree with you lot that at least the traditional human killers and again human with air quots like Michael Myers, and there's worried, it's just there. They really aren't as scary and those films aren't really scary and it's a different type of horror films. Really it's more of a entertainment franchise than trying to really unnerve people. I do think that there are, though, some really scary, scary humans in horror films, like the protagonist in honest or Michael Rookie as Henry in Henry Butt. Right of a serial killer, you will get films that really take it into the depths of the more horrifying human psyche and can really deliver on that. But but if we're talking about actual monsters, as in again newing, creepy, unnerving other than human monsters, I will have to go with a really, really obvious pick, honestly, which is the alien from D alien series. And it's not necessarily just daily and itself, because some of the later films aren't really scary. It's obviously the darkness and the anticipation and the mood of the first one with extra scary and it when it's with you can newly feel it. Clos Rophobia and this terror, the fine monster in the dark really truly works. I'm not sure if it is that the...

...sign of it itself, but I have to say even seeing, I'm not sure if I'm mousing, this is a great given. Even seeing syendomorph x x one to one or a hundred forty one in the light, it is a very nerving creature. Yeah, I guess the Ailien these xenomorph alien from alien isn't a bad pick. I don't know. I've found it that's scary in a adult form, but definitely the chest muster Aina is something which is ingrained in my cinema going memory. Yeah, I think I find it really scary. All that, I love the film, but it is a really beautifully design creature. I think, even if it's not terrifying, it's kind of like a realistic alien because it acts like an animal, like it's a mother protecting its child, and I guess it has that kind of relentlessness as well, because it's it's not killing because it's fun, it's killing to survive, just kind of not scary but one of my favorite sort of monsters, but not the scariest monster. Yeah, they have to say I really struggle. It's really hard to pinpoint them. Also, that is just gain newingly scary in itself. But you're right, Lauren, in that pin had this also really in nerving. Actually my acct with a good one. I'm just thinking are encourage from the original it, not the recent films but the one thousand nine hundred and nineteen mini series. He's quite a nerving character. Does some sub prizing things. I don't know if scary scary as such, but you're definitely war on a scary side, I think for a human when that comes to man. Actually, the only slasher that I really find scary in terms of the character would be a there's a face in text US chainsaw massacre. I think that is a human character who is scary. I don't know. But like the other face, is again a character who doesn't really talk at all. So that just comes down to the Michael Myers, Jason Voorhi's category. For me, I find it much more interesting if they able to port their victims in some way. Whatever the case, the best slashes for me are the ones where the llan isn't super human. So like the scream franchise, where can actually kill ghosts face or significantly wound him or her. Definitely much more effective for me than those horror franchises with a limited number of sequels. Yeah, well, because it feels very artificial, because the reason these flashes are basically unkillable, it's just because they want to make my movies. Yeah, I know, maybe they put like some supernatural theory and Jason Goes to hell. The was the nine hundred and ninety three film in the Friday the thirteen series. I had some super natural exmason. I can't remember the laws complete rubbish or whatever, although it was one of the more interesting sequels, but as a complete rubbish. Oh what about little girl in qualts again from don't look now? I can see him in the red figure. The Red figure does get scary at the end of don't look now. I think most of it. I don't think the red figure itself is scary. The setting is, the city itself is scary and it's all about, you know, walking around or wandering around this foreign land where you know, anything seems possible. So I think that's more environment there rather than the red figure itself, which is scary, although obviously the in part of the look now is very memorable. When I think I don't look now, I don't really think of the little good I think, yeah, like some said again, of the mood of the setting is at an yeah, I was gonna agree that. When I actually went to Venice, that film was all I could think about and every time I turned a corner and I'll be a dead end, I'd be like breaked out. And yet wasn't really about the red girl or anything like that, but just it is really confusing city, so many dead ends, and I think like that's really what I amplifies the horror of that film. Yeah, I think I agree definitely. But that the revealer dain certainly strikes up on the unnerving board. That's the quick pounter question. What would say is the least scary or even unintentionally tell me monster, perhaps even in a good film? Well, there is one that I was going to bring up earlier. I still can decide if it's scary off any and it's the monster in the thing. It's I fin my like a lot and I find it scary, but the first time you see it it's hard to know how to react to it. It's just so strange. I think it's worked for the film that you can definitely do a comedy. Got To that. I think I agree with that, but actually a slightly scream. I do think it worked for the film. But yes, yes, I can see that being turned into comedy. This is a really hard question to answer. I've hand I'd say probably a lot of the old school monsters are probably not very scary when seen. I mean I haven't seen the original Wolfman film or any of those like old Frankenstein films and quite a while, so I can imagine the characters. There would be a little bit goofy. One film...

...that I did mention in the Spanish or a podcast or was a film called the sea serpent where it's got this horribly fake looking on stand. You know, you don't know if you know the lead out to is, you know, more freaked out about how, I'm realistic, it looks. Whether you actually finds it to be scary. Yes, it's that there's some definitely with cheery design characters, I'd say cheaply designed or ones that are budget limitations are probably less scary than ones where they have been able to put some work into it, although of course a lot of like big budget films have got some monsters in there that I really scary. They're just very conventionally weird. Yeah, it's really hard to think of an answer off the top of my head. So I've seen a lot of rubbish horror movie monsters, but one that sticks in my head that is, you know, meant to be scary and serious is the new pennywise from like the new it films. Like it's just so stupid, like I was laughing at it. I like can't take it seriously. I don't find it scary at all. Every time he's on screen. His eyes are all rolling around his head and it's like my boyfriend and I actually do it to each other sometimes, just like because it's so dumb. But yeah, I just found it like so hilariously stupid. I can't believe that that's supposed to be a scary film. Just thought of possibly an examples, thinking maybe the bunny rabbits in Nice of the leapist, which is this terrible film about love bunny rabbits. It's somehow got into the they shoot zombies top a thousand and like all the rabbits made look scary just by shooting them in close up and it's ridiculous. But we were talking about clowns. I was all of all of going to bring up killer clowns from outer space. Then I remembered back in those clowns are actually getting yeah, that those clowns are scary. Yes, my Pek, which is also straight off the top of my head right now, it feels also, I had asked the question, is headed out vampire, which is I'm not sure if even though no, off the brand of car, but it's literally a car vampire and it's a film by you're right. First, among other things, did degree meat their fantastic director. It's actually a good film, but the killer is a car that runs hump blood and it's just not particularly scary. It sounds pretty great. It is actually pretty great that they have a very often mood than I mean you could, you could do a double viewing with rubber. I was Christine. Yeah, definitely actually a film called blood car, which is kind of Similch, but that that was actually a good film. So I don't know. So I know that I already answered this question, but to you, what is the scariest film of All Time? Well, I've also already covered this. It's the shining for me, it's not the stily, my favorite home movie of all time. That would be done of the dead. Yeah, I don't know if I can answer this. This is a really hard one because, like I said before, I don't scare easily. In films are ones that unsettle me, and it's time to say most and prophecies again. But maybe I'll go with oculus. That was just very involving. It's a film about a mirror that may or may not have supernatural powers and it causes this brother and sister who to hallucinate the whole film plays out like an x files episode, are you're not sure in oculis whether or not the mirrors real or whether or not the brother and sister debating each other. Yeah, it's a very interesting film from Mike Flan again, who went on to do doctor sleep and has done some other films in the genre, like Gerald's game and hush and yeah, I don't know if it's technically scary scary, but it's definitely very unsettling because the mirror is constantly playing with these characters minds and film actually Derks want to Rewatch some point to see if it sticks up and is as freaky the second time around. Okay, well, this is an easy question for me because it's the only film that sever made me cry out of the terror. So I was seven, but I begged my dad for like ages to let me watch it and he said no, you're not ready and I was like yeah, I am, and so we finally sat down to watch the film, which was the evil dead, the original one, and I was just absolutely frozen in terror for like about forty minutes and then that pencil and the ankle scene just made me burst into tears and I didn't watch the whole film for another ten years and I'm not as scared by it now. I don't cry, but I think it's still, to me, the obvious choice for scariest horror film because it has that kind of relentlessness in it. But with the sound, and I think the sound and the camera were and that sort of gritty low budget VHS kind of feel really adds to what makes it so scary, because almost feel like a home movie, and I think especially with that Pencil and the ankle scene, it's like actually last for ten seconds and it goes back and forth between the pencil like twisting in her ankle and then close ups of her face and she's just...

...screeching loudly the whole time, and all the monsters in the film as well. I just constantly like screaming and laughing and making these like really creepy, weird noises. I was also think the effects are really good. Is Really Gooy and gory and it's just totally like it just doesn't let up once it starts and it kind of just never let let you go. Every time I watch it I'm just like in awe of how terrifying it all is, seeing if it doesn't any cry anymore. So that's a really easy choice for me. But it isn't my favorite horror film of all time. That's just the scariest one. The evil dead's a pretty good pick up and if I'd say it was scary, scary, but there's definite a lot of out there stuff in there and I think we need more horror films with tree rape in there. Sorry, I couldn't help but mention that. That seems just totally its just totally off the planet. That scene where the free open spreads her legs open and then sort of like plungers in your really expect that in a film from the early s. That was really well when I watched that. If I can mentioned another film I might, because we we have time, I might say unfriended, the second film of the first film, because it was all supernatural. The second film, unfriended Dark Web, was definitely very unsettling for me. I don't know if feel scary scary as such. I definitely extremely unsettling and just the way you know it's all cut together and all being on a screen and just the way you know these people's lives get invaded definitely something I guess because it's very realistic, it's very down to Earth and away, like it could happen to you. That type of horror is generally more scary for me than monsters or Ghuls or whatever. Could ever be another film I think that would be up there for me would be like a razor ahead, because I kind of feel like that film is just it's a nice men the whole thing, and it doesn't scamming quite as much as the evil dead, but it like it's just completely nightmarish. It's only what I can sit really say to describe that one. All right, Rais aheads a good one. I went to fitly one that you don't want to watch. You know, if you like pregnant, you got to be having a child. Very Sense. Probably last you me want to watch. I think good wants like a raise ahead is combat shock, but some similar overlapping themes. Also the presentation Momi a lot of a raisorhead, and I like that you mentioned that raisorrhead is not the kind of feelm we want to see if you're expecting a baby. So, because this leads me into my very last question for this episode. Because, well, I'm not usually that scared of the films themselves. Personally, to me at least, a large part of the power of certain horror films it's not really just experiencing watching it, but the lasting impact. You know, think of being scared of going to sleep after seeing the ELM street films, or reading swimming after seeing Yos. What are some films that actually have an impact in your life to the point that something now scared you that Hapn't before? I would like to say that I never go through the awards any longer after watching the evil dead because I'm afraid of what a tree would do to me. But I don't know if it's an honest ads because I actually usually wander through the woods anyway. I'll see if hey but I can up with an honest dance. I guess the only thing I can think of is the that sound. I don't know how that comes off the microphone, but the sound inhabited we right, a tongue clacking. I guess I never thought of that as being particularly a minus. It was more of a funny sound to me, but now I think if I heard someone just doing that, I would be a little scared. Actually, might have another good one for sounds, just thinking are the clinking of the tea cup and the saucer in get out. I don't know if it necessarily scares me, but whenever I'm out with someone or with family and somebody's doing that, movie get out instantly springs to mind. For me. Doesn't scare me off drinking tea or seeing with people who drink tea, but it's something which, you know, definitely goes well the film goer and me. You know, you know, knows, you know what that means, sort of like whatever I get like a haircut and they want to do like a trim on me and they want to like fim the hairs on my neck, I'm sort of like I've seen Easton promises. I know what might happen, so they cannot shove my neck. For me. That's a great example. I mentioned a couple earlier with you're, not being able to sleep with my hands and feet outside of the blanket or off the bed and avoiding baths with shower curtains. But I also thought of another one which is a had like a real issue with like windows, as I mentioned earlier as well, and actually stems from the twilight zone movie with the gotten the name of the segment, but the one with the Gremlin on the plane, and every time I'm like near a window,...

I'm looking out of a window, I'm like just always expecting to see that little Gremlin or just something like so I pretty much like I never opened curtains. I don't like walking past the windows, especially at night. But here a strange noise outside. I like will not look through the window because I feel like if I looked out the window, I just have a heart attack. But I don't think there's anything else and I think it's nice to me on four thousand feet something like that. The touching of the segments. Yeah, I can remember the number of from like that. Everything about other examples, I don't know. I'm quite a superstitious person, but I'm none of my screen to the mind at the moment. It's probably other stuff where I don't do exaucept soon films and seeing rot the results are. But the eastern promise is one's definitely a big one for me. Whenever I get a haircut, that film instantly springs to mind and I guess, I guess also if I went into a sauna. I guess also after seeing eastern promises, probably also. That's some ground in my mind also. That's actually a great point for I must you have this fear is coming from films for me. But yeah, having Nice at my throw this not particularly pleasant than I would not want to have anybody shave me, ever. In fact, it is just reminded me of seeing the original worship from nine hundred and forty seven recently, which opens up with this long extended scene off command the breating as well. He's shaving him and you can see e how he gets closer and closer to cutting his throws, and that's just that was as gain newly nerving as well. So yeah, getting shaved, but not for me either, but but to get to some films that actually have had a lasting bat for me in this way, I think I'm actually going to go with all of the most traditional wiss psycho that it doesn't really happen all the time, but especially if I'm at hotels with shower curtains, like Lauren said to I will definitely be opening my eyes from time to time just to make sure no one's actually sneaking up on the shower curtain with a knife. So I think that's something that's happened to quite a few people after seeing that, the film of that scene. You know, I never talked about psycho specifically with that's but I definitely do that as well. It's good to not be alone and that I think it's also quite good that you were not alone for this podcast, because it's been an absolute blast getting to know all your innermost fares and Childhood Memories, and I hope you are their listener enjoyed it as well. I feel free, of course, to go to ICM for himcom and share your most horrifying memories, what scared you as a child, and also your list of the scariest film monsters and films off all time. Thank you all for listening and join us again soon. You have been listening to talking images, official podcast of ICM Forumcom.

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