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Talking Images
Talking Images

Episode 40 · 10 months ago

The Very Best Film of 2020

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode Matthieu, Sol, Tom and Chris talk about their number 1 favourite film of 2020. Of course, none of them agree.

You are listening to talking images, the official podcast of I fm Forumcom. Welcome back every one. I'm Chris and I'm once again joined by mature, Tom and Saul to finish of our countdown of the best films of two thousand and twenty with an episode dedicated specifically to our number one films. Off The air. That's right, that magic top favorite and as expected, we're looking at for very different films, three of which even appeared to be a little bit contentious. So let's just jump right into it, following the same order as in the previous episode. Mateur, what is your number one favorite film of Twenty Twenty? Okay, so by number one is Chunikusman's. I'm thinking of ending things. Chellie Cofman is a finmaker. I appreciate a lot that. I think I've tended to appreciate him more as a screenwriter than as a director. The channel sunshine of the spots bind remains my favorite from his work, and this is kind of a channel sunshine with none of the optimism that we shall Googli assuming be brought to it, which might sound terrible, but it's probably more true to WHO Chullie Goldman is and it's also a massive victorial achievements for someone who is so well known for the complexity and sophistication of his scripts, and this film certainly has all of that. What I find remarkable about this film is how splendidly shot it is, how carefully gunman and symatographer Luc as that craft these images, how Kaufman Effort Isti goes from existential drama to cringe comedy and then to musical sequence or parody of an Oscar movie. Of course it all holds together because government is such a clever and thoughtful writer, one who is constantly putting his own hole as a writer in the center of the film. Every government film is kind of about the act of creating it and of what's reflecting on existence means. That's all very interesting, but what's remarkable is how entertaining he also makes it, thanks, it's no small part to two great performances by Jesse plemons and especially Jesse Buckley in the rode that should not work. Her character is, by definition, incompletes and in definite and yet her performance and which is Confman's writing so much and creates a fascinating character where they're almost shouldn't be one. I mean a little coin in discussing this film, because it's a film that asks more questions than than it answers and that leads a lot to up to interpretation. But it's a difficult art to make that kind of film feel lived in and truthful rather than dispassionate and theoretical, and Kaufman is really growing as a director, I think, and succeeds in giving us a new vision of his familiar type of existential drama and comedy. We've talked a lot about endings in this episode and we've mentioned that sometimes we don't love the endings, even from other films in autop five, and I think where I'm thinking of ending things, which has a choice of an ending, is is succeeding, is in the being that's open ended. It's you really can bring a lot to it yourself. But it was on the right side of Ambigus, right it's it's not ambiguous as in well, you do all the work, dear viewer, it's gives you so much that that you can work with. I think before that, in with all of the different styles it explores and with the again, the God go to sinematography yeah, so it's a thing about absolutely left. Yeah, I'm thinking of ending things was my number six going into the podcast, so just scrape past out of my top five. I do think it's a thoroughly excellent film and agree with most of what mature said about it already. What I think really works about the film is the ambiguity and just the general sense of something...

...not quite being right. So that's just a little hints there from you know, thoughts that seemed to be heard aloud. You've got some character names that seemed to change, appearances of characters change subtly from shot to short. There's a whole lot of disorientating things that goes on makes you wonder exactly where it's going, and as it goes on it does actually quite spy out into some unpredictable but absolutely fascinating directions. Something which is interesting about the film but might be a personal thing. When I went into it with the title like I thought when it meant I'm thinking of ending things, I thought that men that she was thinking of ending her life. So I watch the film initially think he was about this woman thinking of committing suicide, but the things that's time is actually about the relationship with the boyfriend, but I don't know, maybe it's going to be a combination of both. But it was really interesting going with it mindset thinking, you know, it's going to be about this woman thinking of, you know, killing herself, ending things, ending the world, and ends up being about the relationship, but then it ends up being a little bit more beyond that. So yeah, I guess just knows a little about it going in. Where those expectations it was. Yeah, really an amazing ride. I didn't quite understand all that by the end of it without reading up a little bit about it afterwards, but the ride was just so amazing or so atmospheric that I didn't really mind either way. Lots of great quotable dialog interesting ideas. One of them something in there about movies being described as lies to pass the time. Just lots of great ideas, as would expect from Kaufman. I like us a lot more than eternal sunshine, which I'm not as big as fan of as most people are probably still put being John Malkovich about this inning. I'm courtman cannon. Up until now I've not really enjoyed any of Corfman's directorial efforts. Like Matt You, I appreciate more is a screenwrit it, but this is a huge step up from what he's given to us before, when it's worked as director. Like Saul said, the sense of unease that builds and builds throughout and these little moments that become more disorientating as the film progresses. It creates a brilliantly disturbing atmosphere and you never quite sure what's going to happen next. It's a strange and beguiling mystery, but you can't look away from it. You'd drawn in and you're very intrigued as to what's going to happen. There's some amazing performances, David Thulis as well, and Tony Colette Excellent, as well as the two leads, and I always love a film which just has a surprise musical number halfway through it, and the one here is truly mesmorize. And so this was another great film that narrowly missed out in my top ten and one that I'm very forward to revisiting some point, because I feel like there's a lot that may have gone over my head and now I've experienced it once over, it be good to go back in knowing where the film goes and just trying to pull out those little nuances to the director makes some little hints that for shadow wats to come. So yeah, really recommend this one. Yeah, I can just join that. It's great work. It's just outside my top ten as well, and the only thing that's really different there is that the convert to you. This is probably my least favorite of the three feature films that the flowing Goff and has erected, and I think it's almost a great sequel in a way to Senecto Key New York, because this is an existential horror film wrapped in the whol thing of a dark comedy, and existential horror is something that Charlie Goffman does better than almost anybody else. It's just this sense of sure life is coming to an end, time is running out and Danity...

...is all there is, and both of these films see kind of just plays with time and reality and life just moving into his much large or much more dreadful and horrifying and almost closed through phole bit te existence. Now I'm thinking eventying is a much smaller work in sense it's far more contained. It's mainly takes place enough few key locations that are also really important locations, to the almost surprise lead, because obviously all of the promotion, in all of the imagery, etc. Guessie Buckley seems to be the lead. She's there. It's almost a narrator, even she's the person len in her voice. But Jesse pleman says, gate is essentially fool. This film is kind of about feel spoiling too much, the way it displays with his life and especially from the perspective of Jesse Buckley as his girlfriend. Or when again, they'll spoiling anything. It's really unique in do some new twists to this kind of extreme psychological horror. And when we're going to talk about they'll spoiling. I'm actually not going to spoil a film coming up from one of Thosan's number one but it has this kind of thing where time is just disappearing. You left disoriented and it's an awful feeling. It's it at the end. It's so great as well. It's just dreadfully clever. It's overly stylized. I do think that maybe the production values, for instance, should have been slightly bigger, but as a Netflix film, as a film that's you know, contained in these more locations. It works so well and yeah, it's a great work I just recommend to everybody, and tearing you guys too, as people who were not as big a fan of his previous theirtoral efforts. I mean it's both for Sholler Kaufman fans and people who are not necessarily shollie Coffman fans. So it seems like you really hit this one out of the park. So everybody listening to this foul definitely see I'm thinking of anything's yeah, I think what you untion about kind of this shift of perspective from Jesse Buckley's character to Jesse plemon's characters, which, by the way, the fact that they have the same name is, it's got probably a coincidence, but kind of perfect is is really difficult exercise. That the thin doos. It could really fade and I think the reason it works is that's why I really high it. I want to hide at the actors, I think. I think they really make that work where it could have really failed. And Yeah, I think what's so mentioned about the title. I think that indiguity of the title is very much pointed right, just like they could be in it seems to mean when she's at least first says it's to be about the relationship, but that the sentence could very easily reference suicide. It's very appropriate, I think, to what the thing is doing in general. I'm surprised to Christ you mentioned the production design being a bit of a disappointments to you. I wonder what you mean by that exactly, because I thought the film looks great. Did you have something specific in mind? Dog just to genuine feeling not not all like it's actually it looks great in the place. It actually is this very, very limited in what it does, and that's that's on point. But as we fell the COPPEN's other previous works, it could have obviously been more expensive, and expensive in this a Netflix film, but within its limitations it works so well and it's so visually well done to so I'm not going to complain about that at all. I just mean that it's on a smaller scale that and connected in New York and obviously is that animated effort and the Mollis after that's all I meant by that. Right, I see actually, which I think I do like that fucus the focus. I did Ding so that's kind of imitation, possibly, of budgets. And moving on to calm, what is your number one favorite film of Twenty Twentday? Here we are for at the number one. So for this one I can ask a question.

I have you ever watched a film and felt like it was made just for you, a film that taps into your subconscious and feeds off your darkest dreams to conjure up a wildly compelling storyline that manifests as a vivid and vibrant nightmare? Now come true? Is this seminal science fiction Harry, by a director and writer, Anthony Scott Burns, that had this profound effect on me, eliciting an emotional response on an intensity and not experienced since my first encounter with blade on it, two thousand and forty nine past. The reason why I come true resonated with me on such a deep level is it's audaciously original narrative that plunges into the science behind dreams and builds upon the fear of sleep paralysis. Many years ago, became obsessed with dreams due to fascination with films such as waking life and the science of sleep, and I had often wondered why they weren't more creative filmmakers willing to utilize dreams as a tool for adventurous storytelle. The fact that come true to versus the world of dreams and is also under an unsettling horror of a striking s visual and all esthetic meant that I was almost instantly taken with it. As someone who has experienced sleep paralysis firsthand, I can verify that beings to strike in imagery comes very close to capture in the sheer terror of the phenomenon. The haunting scenes where the camera pans along a seemingly never ending pathway through all manner of disturbing environments are also chilling and possessing a natural cinematic beauty that I find in maturing, I can certainly understand why the film has had a mixed reaction. The ending, in particular, is bold yet somewhat UN original, though I feel it works perfectly and being too capable hands, and I can't wait to see where he takes us with his next feature film. Come true is of him. That's when I was watching the first fifty minutes or so of its I was thinking where I'm going to have to make home for this in my job fire. This is just great. I think what to describe the the esthetic, the neon kind of estetic right, the mood that's really this thing maker sets and his manichus were, I think, is very striking to look at. I think he uses her quite well. And Yeah, I was really in love with this fim at first and I think the mystery that it builds on with how scared, very odd dreams can be right because it's something we don't entirely understand, that something we such a you have very little control over, and so it's great for the for the whole thing like this. That really smart to use it. That mystery tweets advantage, but I think unfortunately it doesn't rather bits what it has to get closer to that mystery. It's always very difficult to live up to that kind of very master full build up, I would say, and I don't think the film, this one, really succeeds in down that's overall, it's still as a positive experience for me and like huge on I'm very much looking forward to seeing where this filmmaker goes next, because it's clearly a lot of talents in there, just which I just wish that the fins had worked fully funny. My take on come true is similar to mature. I had the same experience that I was really enjoying the film for the first forty five or fifteen minutes and likewise I thought, you know, it's going to be something that's going to be in my top five or top ten of the year. And then about halfway in the filmmakers reveal what the characters are doing and you know, once your revelation came in, the whole thing got a lot less interesting for me. Don't want to support up too much, but just the build up of the mysteriousness of what they are. Colors, there were amazing strong blues and Purple's nighttime shots. Yeah, just looked amazing and it was really encap saying to start off with. But you know, as the film and along as I try to explain more, I guess...

I just found the explanations, I guess, quite dull and generally do much for me. I don't try agree with Tama that films about sleep really great. I Love Waking Life, absolutely love Michelle gone dry science of sleep. Whereas there amazing films, I think a lot can be done with sleep as a topic and I agree. There's not a lot of films on there about it and try a lot of films out there about it and from sure yea had the potential of being one of those great ones for me, but it wasn't quite overall, unfortunately. Yeah, I'm pretty much in the same place as both. Muchure and so I'm going to frustrate up a little bit because all the things I love the most. is actually a kind of comparison to the swarm, where it's been so much time on atmosphere and this stripped back esthetic it's a little bits as a very different visual style. Its shot really well it it's much more wealth to for its kind of semi science fiction. Almost got the clean landscape type of film. So it's really nails that down. It's a very different thutmosthere. I can get why you loved one not the other, but that part of this being a slow, restrained horror shaender film. It's what really it pulled me in here and, like the other said, for the first half or so, I mean it just worked so well. It just kept building tension. You've got these kind of small glimpseless as something maybe going wrong, something else being there, and that part was quite exceptional. But then I think that when it starts taking turns into first of all explaining it a little bit more, it starts feels slightly cheaper and then, without spoiling thing, and do think that the ending is almost a bit of a slap in the face. I understand from them discussing this a bit before the episode that you know there are blues not things. That makes that more reasonable, but it does feels like it goes against what the film was doing, especially in the park that I wasn't enjoying so much already. So that put some damper on the work. But it's a very atmospheric film, it's a it's a very good gender film and it's just totally enjoyable. So anyone who likes, you know, atmospheric visual stroender films as a little bit more strained and builds tension, they just definitely recommended. I'm glad that everyone's on board who appreciating the amazing atmospherics that this film creates. and think it's worth pointing out that the director, and to Miss Scott Burns, also created a lot of the music for the film. He rats music under the guise of pilot priest and he collaborated with electric youth, perhaps most famous for the work on the drive soundtrack, and I think it's an excellent collaboration because was soundtrack really brings the film to life and it's a soundtrack that I listen to aside from the film, because I think the music there is brilliant. And with regards to the film perhaps becoming less great or less exciting once it starts explaining films, I can understand that interpretation totally because the mystery that it builds or is amazing, and perhaps the answers that it starts feeding US along the way and not always satisfying. But as is the case with cream logic, that can be confusion and the RAT director has said himself that everything that happens in the film happens intentionally and you're able to read between the lines and Suss out what he meant it since stage of the film, so and yet to revisit it, but I'm saying excited to give it another spin now that I know that you know everything was put there as intentional and I can try and read into where the director's intentions bit there. I'll see. I'm not bothered by the ending. Like Chris is, I think it fits what kind of thing. This is fine to me. The issue have with a lot...

...of half is well related to the characters, because I think once you're kind of out of the wonderful mood and the buildinger of the the first half of the theme, once the fin just slightly loses a bit of that, I started realizing that I did not care much about the characters and think that's where the thing is just lacking a bit from I think the weight has fun with Dream Logic actually works for me for the most parts, including the ending. I don't think it's great ending, but I think it's more profuse enough for the thing. And moving on to fall lot. If your favorite film of Two Thousand and twenty, it is somewhat fitting that I'm following Tom with my pick, because Tom's talked about come true and it flowing based on dream logic, where's my number one flows on nightmare logic. So my favorite film of Two Thousand and twenty is the scariest horror film that I've seen in a wild. It is a movie about a man who wakes up one day to find strange and unfamiliar persons living in his apartment. They seem to know who he is, but he has never seen them before. Things starts becoming even more frightening as one of the strangers claims to be as daughter. Who are these people and why do they claim to know him? Why they living in his house and why are they talking about and behind his back? And whereas his daughter actually gone? The horror film that I'm talking about is, of course, the living, breathing nightmare that is Florian Zella's the father, starring Anthony Hopkins. Watching the film a few months ago, before the buzz built up and when every man there's dog was still betting on Chadwick bossman winning the best actor Oscar, all that I knew about the father going in it was that there was a film about a man suffering from dementia. I had no idea there was going to be a first person point of view account of the experience of living with dementia. And while some of my cohost in the lead up to the podcast of scoffed, or maybe at least question, the notion of calling on a horror movie, I actually don't know what better description would be of the film. It's a truly frightening and disorientaking experience which I've likened to memento, where the protagonist, you finds, is are able to trust his own mind and able to trust his own memories. It's gone an amazing production design where every single said is actually the alteration of the one said, which brings to mind the movie cube, and it's, yeah, just a totally immersive, living, breathing nightmare experience that I could not more, possibly more highly recommend. Yeah, we spot on their soul. I mean the father is just outside my top ten. Of there as well. I mean you could easy even included in my top ten, and I don't think you're off at all calling it a horror film, because what this film does so well is to get in the put you into the experience what this feels like. Having the men shah. You mentioned the connection to Memento, which, you know, puts you into the experience of someone has short term memory, troubles of memory, and it makes you feel how the world feels to him. That's a little bit less relevant, as little bit less dangerous for all of US power getting the men show or Alzheimer's or some other disease that starts eating us away. That is white the big possibility for all of us, and just seeing this from his perspective, seeing the world change, being unaware of what happened before or after, feeling confused, seeing things just slightly changed, and just two ways people speak and deal with him. You are as disoriented as him in this role. It is a credibly powerful performance and Nopekins,...

I think he definitely deserved to win the Oscary. He's just absolutely fantastic and he can make you break down and it is just really well done. And this is the film was talking about earlier to when we were talking about them taking of any things, because it has this disorienting sense of time and everything changing to so it is just a great, great well planned the way of this having three films that in so way kind of test together coming back to back, but wow, I mean, yes, it's existential horror at this best. It is acredibly strong drama. Might have wonderful performances by everyone involved and it will make you incredibly an ethy. The father was actually in my top ten. It was my number eight. So I definitely agree with most of what has been said so far. I don't know that I would quite call it a whole offing, but I certainly see your point. So it's definitely a huge part of the themes appeal and the way that Floron Zella was able to re adapt to the cinematic medium right, because this is a play first and you can definitely see it. But that first person perspective, the way he uses that, really brings a lot to the fin and we transforms, I think, adequately for what cinema needs. Any Hopkins is obvious just the great I do want to highlight also Orlisa Coleman, who is playing the daughter, one of the incarnations of the daughter, and she, I think a performance is great because she allows her character to be at times irritable, at times kind of not reacting necessarily in the best way, not seen in the best light, and I think that's that's really makes her character work, because we feel the same way. It's really puts us in her position. Even though the find is quite literally from Anthony Hopkins, he's perspective in some way. You guys mentioned memnal. It didn't come to my mind, but it's you guys had to tally right. It's completely obvious. It's very related. But because the film puts us in Anthony Hopkins is perspective, but by definition it's dance, right. We remember what happens in the per seans, and so we're kind of in the sit perspective and I think the thing really handles that that you went so yeah, it doesn't give me that this is as something. I really like how Chris pointed out this similar themes amongst all of our number one film so far, films that told you of our emotions. That puzzling, disturbing in parts, but I have to disagree with souls classification as the father being a horror to me that feels like saying hereditary is a family drama. Yes, it is, but primarily it's a horror film and the father is not primarily a horror film. It's a disturbing, unsettling watch, but I would definitely classify it as a drama. That being said, it is an excellent film, some really good performances a beautiful classical score to go along with it. The only thing it lacked for me was the emotional punch towards the end. I know that and maybe on my own saying this, but I feel that there's been other films in the past that have dealt with this theme and accomplished much more, such as Michael Hannaker's film and more, and also Sarah polly's film away from her. That's not to take away from the power of the father. It is a great film. Just feel it doesn't quite live up to the forementioned films. It's interesting the films that you've brought out as comparison pieces Tom I might mentions before. I haven't seen them. More because everything I've heard about it. You know it's about taking care of, you know, a woman who's dying. It doesn't sound like a particularly like it wouldn't be uplifting, but it doesn't sound something which I would enjoy or get much out of watching. It sounds like just thing I would just find depressing. So I've never actually sat down and watched it. I haven't seen away from her for a couple of years, but that...

...was a film that I liked a lot more. For Golden Pince, it's performance and his side of it rather than Julie Christie side of it. I guess you know, with him you see more of, you know, the emotional tolem or. Didn't really sit through Julie Christie's character, but other than that. I haven't really thought about the connection between that film and the father than you dropping it on just then. Is Interesting in Parison to make in terms of it being a horror film or year her dry as a family drama. Is that a horror film of family drama first or foremost? I don't know. Think Hereditary is probably a family drama. That becomes a horror film the father is well, I don't know. I think depends which way you look at it. If you're looking at from his point of view, it is a horror film because he's seeing all these people, doesn't know why they're they're wise in their prom why they're saying these already lived there. He's in constant fear and anxiety, which is the definition of horror. But you know, other than trying to get an included in mighty sparks has, are they shoot zombies, cannon? I don't know the definitions really that important about whether it's horror or not. It is a fantastic piece of cinema. I agree with what mature said about Olivia Commons performance. She's fantastic. Olivia Williams also as the other incarnation and even while the other side characters do really well, considering how and because their roles are and how their roles sort of change a little bit depending on anthles Hopkins Perspective and what's happening. In terms of the ending and having the emotional punch, I'm not sure about it. The ending, I guess, was maybe not as affecting for me as the different parts of it is. He's like going in between different rooms of his house and how the different time peerage seemed to change as he's changing rooms. I mean that's probably the scariest part of the film for me, but a definitely left, I yea quite an impact with me to the point where it actually dethrone promising young woman, which is not something that I ever saw coming. Yeah, I can pretty much agree with that. I mean I think that the ending does have an emotional punch. They could have been stronger and I do agree that a lot of the parts before we are stronger. I think what does work with the some of the final scenes is that the kind of dishells a little bit of what someone at US adres that we as looking outside of it. We know we remember, but the thing is the film consistency makes us unsure of what do you remember all be remembering it correctly, or what we are seeing actually what happens or what's happening right now, or part of it. Memory are part of it, dreams are part of it. Alter within his head you don't know, you you do, can only get the sense of being this truly disoriented, and that's one of the most powerful things that the father does. But onto my favorite film of Two Thousand and twenty, and one that unfortunately, probably does have that many overlaps with the three films preceding, though it may have a little bit more to do with films like, for instance, promising young woman, just even more to the side of metal satire that I really love, but my co hosts might not appreciate it to the same degree. So it is it all do you this uppercase print? And let's just put it like this. I mean whoever said that lines delivered flat without any emotion cannot deliver a punch? Is We wrong? At least in my opinion. So of my cohosts may disagree, but this is a large part of where the power, both in terms of harmony and horror, comes from in this film. I mean, just to clear, this is not prison's monologs. This is recitations of real report and letters, and in the most awkwardly amusing way. But as the film continues it just becomes increasingly disturbing. UPPERCASE print takes from the archives the real story and the...

...real words of a literal massive investigations. It who wrote slogans in well, you guessed it, uppercase print on the walls in book arest in one thousand nine hundred and eighty one. This horrendous criminal act sets forth an investigation with hundreds of informant countless police officers staking out the spect areas and increasingly bizarre report, including leathers from regular people and to reactions to the events, each of them thinking the fact that these slightly anti government, or rather to quite antigovernment slogans, which are just quite slight, quite small, or the worst crime that was ever committed. And this is presented in a visual world that is essentially like a D darge stedio of learning, but blown up to a much larger scale and then moved into some kind of incredible breaktian theater. And this is actually a brickton documentary theater adaptation. The characters here are standing in front of walls decorated merely by things like a massive recording device, a massive TV and other is exaggerated props giving some kind of semblance of context, and then they're just lighted up in these strong colors before our characters, if you will, recite the reports, their letters, their notations. With this deadpan delivery, the reality of life in s Romania becomes increasingly clear. And to create an even larger context. And all do you the intercuts, real foot there's from TV stations from the same time, connecting the real reality of political suppression and this discommuting dance. These quote the kind of lies they were telling themselves and this horrifying big brother, and it's like a lighthearted fall of farce. You see calls for patriotism. The State is trying to create this kind of lull, pooling people into a weird submission, and it just increases the comedy more and more. will also becoming terribly clear. That is just so wrong. This is an absolutely terrifying reality to live within and it's for me aprics prints and men throughout you dispositions as one of the great cinematic masters of our age. It takes all of the myth elements has been experimenting with his entire career even further, creating a met I say that the sex and cold textualizes and dramaticizes almost every part of society at this point in time and throughout his career he's pointed that focus everywhere, from the fascist in Romania to the film industry. He systematically just going through Romanian society and dissecting it piece by piece, by peace and breaking it down more and more. And this is put like this I need. For me, the ending seen in particular, is just so strong and place with ideas of breaking down all walls and make me clear that they're watching and interacting with a film as well as history with essentially, the participations are speaking directly to you. You are an active participant and this is what would all do. That does so well in his films, amplified even more in his very in all the win they're from this year as well, which I'm sure will be in my top list, and we go through a two thousand and twenty one films. So this is a film I absolutely love. As you can tell from my presentation. It may be a little bit more niche, it may not work for people are not necessarily into metal narratives or artels films, but if you are, this is one more film on my list that I cannot recommend more. Yes, quite interesting,...

Christian, you talk about they are still to dead hand acting and how engaging you found it, because when I was watching this film, with all the stilted performances and looking the characters who or directly addressing the camera, I actually thought I was watching a mockumentary at first. And then you've got the secret police who are checking the hard writing on every single piece of mail, having for surveillance vehicles and for officers stationed outside graffited locations having listening devices. I thought, you know, this is a really, you know, funny ear and Mockumentary, but then, of course I forced the film, did a bit of research and actually is a documentary. So it is interesting. How could you mentioned before? There's a little bit of comedy in there. It's sort of the film plays up the comedy of it, and definitely the TV footage which you mentioned, with all of the seeing about how great Romania is, or the archive footage there, does sort of like painted as a little bit, you know, comical. But I guess to me watching it, the emotional involvement wasn't really quite there because of the Stuart of performances. I'm quite big on acting. I guess you know it sounds awful, but I guess you know that's what happens from being raised a conventional narrative films. But you know, you know absolutely despised the living world which is this two thousand and three film which is apparently impress and style with deadpan performances and you know, I just, you know absolutely, you know, can't stand dead pan performances. It is something which absolutely takes me out of a film to a point I'm not able to immerse with it. So I sort of appreciated the way the film's trying to like put out the human him rabbit, but I'm pulling out the hum Rabit by having all this dead pan stuff in there. It just made a hart of him in a come emotionally invested in. And then, you know, the time sticking away, it gets the two hours and I guess by the time the film was over I found it a bit more exhausting and exhilarating. It's definitely very interesting, it's definitely very different, but it's not really a film that I enjoyed as much as I appreciated what the filmmakers were trying to do with it. I love listening to Chris Speak About Jude as a filmmaker. He's so enthusiastic and passionate about him that even though I'm not being enamored with any of the Jude Films I've seen so far, Chris is passion is infectious and it's kind of keeps me coming back. I'm like, I'm sure there must be something here, there must be something that is making an impression, make an impact on Chris, that's going to connect with me one day, and it hasn't yet. But I have to say that I totally agree that he's a unique voice in cinema right now. But uppercase print was a bit too experimental for my liking and the documentary footage often felt disjointed. I think I'm similar to Mattio's pick earlier than monopoly of violence. Perhaps this might have a strong appeal for a native audience, as lots of archive footage and cultural references that don't really mean much to me. It was an interesting film, but yet just one that didn't really time with me. So, unlike Chris, I have had a good experience with how do you do with I do not care if you go down into history as barbarians. Think that Chris had pick for for our episode, about two thousand and eighteen I think, and which I did love, but this one did not really work for me. So mentioned it's become exist or exhausting after point, and I kind of agree with that. On the main, the main device of the film, right, this whole case around the graffiti arts. It's not so much as that was exhausted by it, it's just that I kind of lost interest in it. I don't know if it's the style, which I'm fine with, or if it's just a content. I did not find this story to be. That's illuminating. Right. It's an interesting story, but maybe not a two hour's story, and I was a little dip pointed in that because, on the other hand, I did really appreciate the...

...choice that you didn't make makes of using all of that archival footage. I think that's actually kind of a brilliant idea of putting you in the shoes of someone living in Romania in the S. and what's what you're being fed, right right, what's is your environment, and contextualizing the story he's telling in that way. I think is a great idea. I just wish I had been more interested in the story itself. Yeah, I can definitely feed that and I'm really happy you enjoyed the documentary footage, because that's all the things that most of the critics that just like the film we're complaining about the most, that they wish that this was slimmed down, because it got it took some of the focus away, and I really what I really like, period is really the balance between just showing how take over the top and how scared the people were and how everyone were essentially telling stories, lying to himself, lying to everybody else, because it didn't know who they could trust. They were so worried about the parents that something this minute would be the greatest strategedy in the world, and that's just really what drives both to humor and the horror, and I thought that the balance was excellent. I can definitely see why you a specially matter who liked this. Some of you this previous films. We're not like this as much because it is undoubtedly his most experimental, it's his most Meta. It is the film that offers at least in a variety, I suppose, in terms of acting styles, Equat and focused, and in most of it is in front of stages or with these intercups of films. So if this is your first you then you'd kind of like some of what you're seeing, but you think is too extreme. He's on. The films are not as extreme at all, and I can see that. You know a lot of you, the fans, for instance, like bad luck banging, which is the better than dollar win. There are a lot more, and that's response from the critics as well. So this may just be catering. Like like yeah, Tom said earlier, when I film is made just for you. This may really be. This one of those films that is made particularly for people with very extreme sensibilities. The rest of you, the films are not as extreme. They're a little bit broader and those may work better for you, but for me personally, this is one of his better works, not as great as you know, his masterpiece. I don't care if we go on history as barbarians, which would be my number one recommendations to everyone. Hasn't seen you the film yet, but yeah, and Doubtfley still my number one favorite film of Two Thousand and twenty and it's just I feel. I'm sure I'm going to a beer watching several times in the future as well. You know, you mentioned earlier that's our tops. We of daugh top ones, Tom Soland and minds, or having common this kind of playing with reality. Is it tweet? Is it not too much, with some dreams and and et Cetera, and yours doesn't quite as much, but actually it does your favorite thing in the whole world, which is disconfusion between documentary and fiction so much that's also playing with reality. So I think we do. We do have a scene utifying us, but what the great way to finish the episode. I'm as well. So everything's comes together. The final number one choices for all pick to aligne perfectly and all that note that it's had to thank you all so much for listening and join us against you. You have been listening to talking images, official PODCAST OF ICM FOR USCOM.

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