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Talking Images

Episode 37 · 9 months ago

The Minimalist World of Robert Bresson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

How much can you strip away? How far can you go? Robert Bresson did not just create his own cinematic language. He created his own cinematic ideology - striving to tear film away from the theatre, strip away all artifice and create something you could only experience through cinema.

Over his 13 feature films, and one standalone short, his career spanned from 1934 to 1983. In this episode, we will talk you through each and every single one of his films, look at what they minimised, try to understand why and above all try to express just how it makes us feel - and why it works ... or doesn't.

This is the story of how Bresson became Bresson, and how his minimalist world developed, evolved, reached dead ends and rejuvenated itself.

Timestamps:

00:00 - Intro
02:26 - Our first reaction to seeing a Bresson film
03:25 - Bresson, the canon and the French New Wave
07:21 - Things to Know Before Seeing Your First Bresson
10:59 - Short film: Affairs Publique
14:45 - Angels of Sin
18:10 - Les dames du Bois de Boulogne
22:40 - Diary of a Country Priest
29:05 - A Man Escaped
37:04 - Pickpocket
47:46 - The Trial of Jean of Arc
54:24 - Au hasard Baltazar
1:02:32 - Mouchette
1:10:46 - A Gentle Woman
1:21:17 - Four Nights of a Dreamer
1:28:00 - Lancelot du Lac
1:32:38 - The Devil Probably
1:35:55 - L'Argant
1:51:07 - Filmmakers Inspired by Bresson

You are listening to talking images, the official podcast of ICM Forumcom. Welcome back everyone, I'm Chris, and in this episode it will take you into the minimalist world of Robert Pressng and confronted in all its cold and calculated power. Experiencing some of this man's films can almost be like going into a battle against all cinematic conventions. There are simply no directors like presalm. What could he not strip away? Exposition, music, emotion, violence, action. Even time, his actors were not even allowed to well act. He saw them as models that he, as a director, could mold and arrange. As for beautiful scenery and in imagery, yes, and deniably, there is much. But the abhorred the idea of postcardism. You want images to exist as a greater whole, nne of staging. The other he developed an entire cinematic ideology and it's impossible to ignore it. But we are also interested in how his films make us react, how they make us feel, and and of course they don't all make us feel the exact same way. Even more importantly, present was not always the Preston we think of today. His style grew and the wolved ideas were formed, new experiments were made. That is why it's so incredibly exciting to be able to go through his entire demography. Yes, it's right. We will cover each of the thirteen feature films in made between nineteen forty three and one thousand nine hundred and eighty three, as well as his soul short film from one thousand nineteen thirty four. And let's just spoil that right now. It's something quite different. But before we get intolved that, let me introduce it to my two absolutely wonderful cohosts, Clem and mature, bold countryman of Bresalm, and just as you this first quite easy entry question. Do you remember what your first reaction was to seeing a Robert Person Film? Hey, this is clem from friends. I believe the first movie I saw from him was what is most famous one and man escape. I really liked it. It was quite unusual to see how stripped down that say to film was, how an emotional everyone seemed to be. But UN those they were emotionless that I could still feel the emotions, and that's what that was really incredible. Hi, I'm mature, from fans also, and I guess I guess the first time I saw prestment film was journal like that companion or diary of a country priest. But by the time I saw it I knew what to expect about crescent styles. So I guess I wasn't that surprised that it conformed to my expectations. But it's kind of interesting that Breson to me. He's not someone I was aware of before becoming a snefied, unlike most of the major French filmmakers, even people like Romere and Vette, their names I was familiar with before, where as I remember, like the first time I looked at the site and sound lists, seeing these French films that I had never heard of was quite surprising to me. Yeah, I had the same feeling that Brayson is not at all well known here in France. Well, while what he is in in cinefied circles, right, and in Gatings, critics love for song, but yeah, only in sine, if I yes, circles, but the general public haven't even heard of him, let alone see when its films. So yeah, which is really because we have some, because we have some like at house, filmmakers that are famous, like Rome are. I mean he's not, he's not a poculist, but he's quite famous. Yeah, he's known, but people probably haven't seen that many of his films. Same goes for a good lum or try fool. Yeah, Shoup, all that. Those names are pretty big. But Brayson, for some reason, well, I guess maybe it's because it wasn't really a part of the French new wave, which is quite famous here. Maybe I don't know that that's a really good point. Actually, any themes that a lot of people even sometimes confused him with a French new wave because a pickpocket and just the fact that many of his likely older films before late fifties. On nesitarily the films that come up first. Yeah, but then you get something like muchettes, which is could not be less that like the French new wave and is contemporary cheeks. So yeah, yeah, I think I get is probably the closest, atleastuff from what I've seen. I guess four nights of a dreamer is also quite a bit new wave. You know, in a sense it reminded me quite a lot of on what something home malk could have done. It's that's actually all of those things I...

...was thinking about to I don't remember the name of the actor. Uses a professional actors of course, as he always does, but just the way his lead looks in that film, with it's well, it reminds me that so much of little the and the kind of films he did with, for instance, Eustash, with with like the modern the whole for instance, and the kind of do we should look to remember, with a lot of the color films from the French way with it's really interesting, especially the first time I saw what I really thought this could have been his new wave film, though when I saw it again last week, it did of course strike me as yes, it is undeniably breast is still completely stripped down, but there's still something about it that has that kind of association and forms. I understand he was one of the few filmmakers, don't we established that the French new wave guys kind of respected rights him, Kruzoo Meneval, I don't really about it, but yeah, not the pretty much that it's that. This true. I think good art in particular, loved present past into will obviously the main inspiration for the French new wave and cofounder of cares cinema. When he died before most of Preston films were made, but he considered dire of a country priest to be the greatest exercise in film cutsism actually until that point. So I did so, I think. I think it's definitely a lot of love for for resting in the in the new wave, and there's a lot of love for Preston elsewhere too. I think if you look at us, the site and sound list, he is number eleven of all time, of all directors. If you look at they should pictures, is a number seventeen and even though he's on our own list, on ICM forum he's ranked thirty six at the moment. He has been as high as thirteen. So I think there is a lot of love and respect for Preston in almost any cinephile circle and critic and academic circle you will you will enter into. Yeah, he's Prov reason most well liked to make here. That isn't known at all when you exit the sniff as it couldn't, which is quite quite strange. Yeah, yeah, it's possible. I really like the teasis and it's and I think why that is as well. I'm sure we this go over it a bit more and we talked about is how rich it he was in Surways, how stripped down, how different that Loos from their conventions. But if before we actually dive into his short film, which is nothing like this at all, what do you think someone who has never seen every strong film should know before giving it the shot? I think they should be warned to not expect any acting. I mean that exaggeration, you know. I think they should be one of that, because otherwise it could be a little ilienating. But I think that's about it's really it's. I mean, if you into a house film, that's really all you need to know, I think. And even sual you're not acting the film are still or fat is, for me, very interesting. Sometimes he reminds me of a less extreme version of scroban really, where is like is the same, like the this character standing and not moving and just reciting their dialogs, and I think by someone is like that, but more entertaining in a way. I guess he manages in his situation the way films and the way his character moves and the way they tell their dialogs to to make it seem a bit real in a sense. I think that's as interesting way of explaining breast never heard so far. Throw Julyet, but with more action. She's like a cost between those guys and hitchcock. Basically, yeah, I can't believe that it works. Some of his films made me, made me think he could have been the friendship hitchcock if he had wanted to, but obviously he had other ideas in mind, which is probably be for the best, I think. Yeah, probably, and also it's so well, but we have you already have clothes, though, on the already have the vivor trying to do some hitchcock things. So it's good that he set out on his own. Yeah, but I do think that his ideology should at least get how they put it. Not sure how knowledgeable you need to be about his underlying ideology, but I think it's really interesting to know just just what drove him to make films the way he does and the way he worked with actors as well. Can Be really dumbfounding the first time especially. I think the first time myself was probably pickpocket, which just rubbed me completely the wrong way. With these dead eyes, you just felt at that point very loadsome and I didn't respond to that until much later. And I think the fact that he for instance, would instruct his actors to well, first of all not act, but he would work on them to speak in this monotone voice, as if just carrying out an internal monolog the way he would, you know, try to focus on aspects of the...

...body that wouldn't act, like the hands. That I think it. There's a lot of additional interesting things to know about Preston and where it came from, including his ideology as a Christian believing in essentially the terminism, but I'm not sure if that's needed to really enjoy his films. It's just something that makes them more interesting to go back to a suppose. Yeah, and I think the religious aspect is kind of present anyway. Yeah, even if you don't know about it, it shows up pretty fast in most of his streams. I think I'm not one of them, but yeah, yeah, it's a fun thing to know and maybe to try to spot when you're watching his films or re watching these films, but I don't think you need to know much about that to to enjoy his films. I mean I think I've seen this entire filmography without really knowing about all those details and more I really enjoy most of his films. So it's nice to know when you re watch them, but you can, I just think, definitely enjoy them without knowing. And what that said, let's go into the film that I think the least amount the people haven't dioyed, but also because least some other people haven't seen it, which is a fair probleet. His one thousand nine hundred and thirty four short film, which is often described as a slap stick comedy, and it's it's one of those very odd early sound films that plays a lot around with some visual ideas. Think it's very clever thing. It's very fresh, a little bit cute. Some people are compared it to what we go was doing at the same time, but I claim I see this as well. So what are your thought a fair public? Well, I haven't rewatched it, sadly, so I don't remember much. I remember liking it and being almost shocked that Bison did something as so different, because I must have. It's probably one of the last thing I saw of him. So I knew about him, I knew about the type of movie usually makes. So saying this very popular, let's say that, which is not a bad thing at all, but you know, very popular comedy and almost a slapstick, as you said, coming from someone who made such a trip down and very minimalistic film was definitely something unusual and very unexpected. Yeah, I unfortunately had to see it youtube because I don't think it's been released anywhere, and maybe in France. So the quality was very poor of the print, but I can still kind of see that's a kind of visual magic it was working on as well. Were there was so many really cool ideas that you wouldn't really associate with personally that there's especially one scene where I believe Prime Minister who's holding a speech in front of a statue of himself and the statue is yawning and he yawns this identical yawn and in this this ocean of duplication, the higher audience started your as well. And there's just so many other almost a pleasant little visual with nets and this playfulness here that shows a completely different breason. Yeah, yeah, totally. Regarding the quality of the print, I don't think there is a good quality print anywhere because, from from what I remember, it was believed to be lost and it was found in the the s. We found a copy, so where? So I don't think that there are that's many copies available will of good quality, and so far I don't think anyone has taken the time to remaster it, probably because of demand. Is Not that that I but maybe one day someone makes a huge box set of every posson films. Maybe, maybe they will take back that short film and remaster it. Maybe twill be, I don't know, better to watch it in a good quality than the queity theories of an important now, even though it's totally watchable. No, I definitely agree that, as it could re emerge as this, you know, Wonderful Triumph of the thirties. I've no one thought it was. It is still a bit hard for me to judge because it is quite corroded. But that's luckily not the case for any of his feature films. I think there were a few bad copies going around for a while, but today everything seems to be released on BLU ray or gotten proper criterian releases etc. which is a great joy. And that includes his very first, early films from the forties, which are the films that are, I suppose, the least person in and also the least talked about, probably as a result, but they are all the same incredibly interesting, and we can jump straight to angels of Sin Or, if I can announce it correctly, the arenstre perch, which was this very first film from one thou and forty three, already handling and working with religious motifs. It's set in...

...a nunbery, already looking at human nature and, surprisingly to me at least, already stripped quite down. You could clearly see a lot of signs of the Director Preston will be, though it also strikes me as I'm much warmer and, less to say, I'm much less misanthropic you of the world, because so before the police gets to you, Chris, just protect you this archiepishy is how that's pronounced. Thank you. I was waiting for him for that. From that you, I mean, it's all I can contribute because I haven't seen the those first user. Okay, I mean it, just to give up really quick rundown of what the film is about. It's set in a reformist nunnery, essentially, that takes in ex prisoners and essentially tries to redeem them, and we follow a much larger character gallery than we ushould do, but I would say the drama is set around this young, idealistic woman coming in to the nunnery and a meeting is one woman in prison who she wants to essentially save, and it the focuses on the way these two characters interact, how much the prisoner load the Numb, but at the same time you start to see how some of her efforts maybe working. It's still stripped down film. It's still a very quiet film. It still has so much magic in the visuals and just some of the same focuses on the hands. And it's interesting as well that this is the film where that person later said he discovered a lot of what he wanted to do. He started to rall filming see how you want to strip down performance, but it didn't really work with professional actors. Apparently there's trying to get what they wanted even resulted in tears, which is which is probably why he wanted to turn to non professional actors later. I don't remember the film that that well to discuss it, but I think it's interesting to know that in them by Song's life he was a prisoner of war just before making the film. So I wonder how much that experience influence in from what I remember it's film that is shot mostly or completely inside them. So do you think Chris maybe is experience as a prisoner of war as influence the way he made a film? I think that's definitely true, and I think this clostrophobia and the idea of prison is something that runs through so many of his films as well, and we're going to talk about presence characters or models in prison several times in this episode. But but I think you're completely write it that that kind of more claustropobical look does help anxious in quite a bit the so it's also, at least in contrast, the presents later film a lot warmer. But that's something you can't really say for his next film, ladies of the park. Or again I'M gonna be calling on the French language police, the Dumb Du Bar, the Bologna. Is that correct matter? Yeah, that's good. That's good. Finally, okay, this is good. This is good, but I think what's really weird to anyone who wants to try to see result's career as a kind of clear trajectory really discoverage what they want to do, and this is at least to me. I feel that takes it up completely different direction. It's far more dialog based, is far more character oriented. You really get motives of the character drawn out into this elegant game to the extent almost that I would say that it almost feels a little bit more like a coctor film. Now cooctor wrote the dialog of the film, even though breasts on wrote a scenario, and you can really feel so many similarities to a lot of the other work cooktor was involved in. It's does, I would honestly say it's the least personian film of as I fromish first short that they ever directed. Yeah, I would definitely agree with that and I think his first to film are the film that has the less personality. That could have been made by by anyone. You mentioned cook too, but you could have been cooked or another filmmaker, which is not a criticism. You know it because his first two films. So obviously you know. You know it's very rare that from the very first film and the filmmaker manages to create his own filmmaking way. There's still two good films in my book, but yeah, definitely the two that are the less Britt Union. Regarding the the second film in Boulogn it's quite it's a quite good film. It's yeah, really much, very much relies on dialogs, as you said them. It's a film that Dria really...

...feels strange in my son's filmography, because there is all this aspect of revenge and resentiment that the main character is filling for a lover who is living her at the beginning of the film, which I believe is not really a theme we will see later on in my song films. You complete the right claim, and especially if you think about his ideology and his view on the terminis them. I mean later in his career, with essentially just strip away motives. It wasn't that interested in motives anymore. But Let dam DU box the Bologna. It es actually all about motives. It's the entire scenario on situation build it's on the fact that this woman has been scorn or is even in the process of being scorn, as you learned at the beginning, and then essentially the signs this trap for her lover. And it's such a cool film. But it's a darkly comedic film in a way as well. And again this is world reflective of cook ought to be honest, but just the games that are played, the carefulness of the scenario, the way essentially he'll an, played by Maria Kasada, really just essentially commands every single and then it's not fake. It's her. Essentially, there's this guiding everything in this movie. She's playing them like a fiddle and it's it's just seeing her do things that are seemingly good but with the darkest intentions, and the way this works, and that's such a joy for me to see. I really think it is a great film and I honestly one of the in my opinion at least, it might be site of controversial, the one's better French films of the forties as well. Just such a even though with that's almost nothing, without Preston, would relate it just as such an interesting course, such a fascinating play between characters and with with also such coldness and darkness and again, really bleak, subtle humor. It's a very interesting in different film that I think anyone who might be ignoring it and not seeing it simply because it has this reputation as not being Pressonian, which is completely true, just go and see it anyways, at least as my opinion. Yeah, anyone who likes French films from the S and S. should definitely see it. It sounds like my ass is really reason to see it's certainly it would be mine. I think she's a great like very Kais Magic, very theatrical actress, and it sounds weird to have her in the West offing, but I guess it's not that much of a blest film, so home that makes sense. Yeah, she's quite a she's quite good in the film and I think it's worth nothing to that. I mean, this is also based on the constraint that Presson were placed under. He really couldn't secure funding for films unless you had professional actors or an actresses, and that's why it also took him such a long time to be able to do what, in my opinion, and it is his masterpiece and we might do it, is a really little bit on this. But diary of a country priest was, in fact it is very first film with nonprofessional actors and while it's certainly still not exactly the Breaston you will associate with pick pocket or Luche, and it is such a powerful, powerful film, focusing in on this exact country priest and seeing through his well, his actual diary it's you see him writing and reflecting on the events as we see the events. It may just be the cooler show effect, that acting is still really stripped down, but there's just so much melancholy in the performance of Claude let do, who would actually go on to become upper a professional actor as well. But this is the emotion from ye there. It's absolutely incredible to me. If just such a powerful, powerful film. Yes, so, I don't think of it as being his masterpiece, but I do think I guess it's the first thing I think about with a person, maybe because it's the first one I've seen. You say it's not the person we think of, but to me it is, again, maybe because it's first exposure, but I think the central performance here is like the typical performance by a person protagonists, and it works really well. I think, as you mentioned, the courage of effect is is really working here, as it will be in his other films, and we can project a lot on to him, but he is a character and I think that's kind of a difficult balance that these performances have to strike and I think they don't all do it, but I think he manages it or and the rest matters. It's with him to have this character who is kind of a martyr, but it's never yeah, it's never didactic. I think that's one of the thing I appreciate a...

...lot with Reson is he has this often very pessimistic view of humanity and life on earth really, but he lets you do what you want with it. He's kind of staying out of the way and that's, I think, one of the things that make this film work. We do it. I don't know if you guys think of it as a crisis of faith film, because when I first watched it I thought of it in relation kind of to all those Bergmann films with these religious characters who are having a quest of face. But and there are some similarities, but it's also very different, I think because of the way, because of my Portuns, it's because it has this kind of exterior view of humanity. At times he's looking at human reality. But yeah, in a way that isn't he manages to not be judgment on but to make us judgmental in his place. Is that makes sense, which I think is quite different from the man, black man, Swedish conversation police gets me. Is that curse? Yes, pretty much seriously badag man. Okay, so I think, even though, on the reason that that that's that's very good, the one of two things that I like to do when I watch breast breath on is to try to see what he's minimizing in a little bit of rist the minimalism game. and well, things that found really interesting here is that we hear a lot about this priest being out of tune. We hear a lot about him lacking social skills and we see a little bit of that. We also hear a lot about the things you want to do, that he wants to reform, if we don't actually hear what he wants to do. We hear people comming to him, talking about tower being ready for his great ideas. We never hear what his great ideas are. So this kind of this this base motive, is actually removed. It specificity is removed and essentially allows us again tying into the cool shell of that the way rest all makes film. Its essentially allows us to put whatever motives or vision we see onto this character and reflect on it, while we also see his internal pain. Yeah, he's basically a character who has theoretical ideas about what the world is and what it should be and is confronted with the harsh reality and really cannot cope with it. And he is kind of a match, but he makes himself a matter. I mean, he really mistreats himself. Again, you can decide what you think about it, but in a sense he's very egotistical but also very altruistic. Again, it's it's really the one leaving you a lot of room for interpretation, I think, and that's also the white my point on how it's not quite the present we used to at least for me. There was a more drastic shift with pickpocket, and now talk about that a little bit. When we get to our next film. A man escaped as well, but I think both die of a country priest and a man escape has a greater degree of sensuality. In a way. It's doesn't, how to say, Miss and droplet that we see in a lot of this later film. It's not as cooled. If you look at the way the faces are shot and the ambience in the feeling. It almost says this. I think the best very will see is the sensuality. It minds me more of the kind of magic that you would see in the gazing faces of his contemporary coctor with all the work the previously when book to all managed to really get into his own later as well. You just have this kind of central visual, practical spirit of it. You just feel drawn into these eyes, while from pick pocket onward it really feels like those eyes are pushing you away. I think I see what you mean with the main performance, but the centrality thing definitely with a man escapes, not so much with this one. For me, I do think of it as being a cold film. I mean I think of those landscapes right it's very winter. We or at least four landscapes in the countryside. Yeah, I don't think of it as a warm from at all, but maybe that's why you think it's a master piece and I don't like it's to be well, I don't. I don't need Britain film to be warmed to love it. I think like John, it's my second favorite, but little into one of results most beloved films. A man escaped or, and this time I'm really gonna be caught by the French pronunciation place in condemn their I'm more set a chapere whole events to flair will van. That's not that that was pretty good. I thank you. I think you could have stopped that. I probably should have. I think what's really fascinating here is that, again, like you said, this is a film that also has this centrality right or as if you said. I feel that as contemptrary to the previous films hasten, that added sense of sensuality, and it's also light. There a country priest and pickpocket heavily narrated. It's based on the Journal of the first who this really happened...

...to, and it's broughtly his words that are used to get the same experience with retelling with the past and with slow focus. But with that, and this is somewhat unusual for wrest on, even though it's going to tie us into big pocket as well, there's a lot of tension and I would claim suspense, as our our lead lieutenant on Tom Carefully plans his escape, lowly, works on getting through his store, slowly place with all of these little things he needs to get and put in place and learn for his escape to be possible. Are In this is four years before better did leat rope, which are almost similar. Effect, was just this slow, wonderful suspense and I think press on did it essentially as well, but with a plot that's even more stripped down and you almost get caught up in this magical tension and escape is probably my favorite film by my song. I really, really liked the first time I so it. I re watched it this weekend. I think I liked it even more this time. I ton't agree with everything you said, Chris, especially in the contrast between warm and cold that there is between a man escape and pick pocket, especially if you look at the main character here. The main character, look Nonfontein, is well, a little bit open to the people around him. He still talk to them. They know what is going to do, that he wants to escape, he still needs to have this conversations with the other prisoners. In people get, however, it seemed that the main character only wants to escape conversation. It doesn't. It's in that it doesn't want to talk to anyone, and they as people around him that care for him. So maybe this feeling of coldness people people get has maybe also comes from this, the position of the main character, but I guess we'll talk about that more later on. Regarding a man escape, yeah, I was really shocked me. What's The music, the use of music and the sound, because they are almost no music throughout the film. There's only some part from Mozart here and and there, but overall it really relies on the natural sound of the film, which I think adds lots more to the tension. You can hear him scratching on wood, you can hear him breaking glass, you can hear him work with iron and every noise is just accentuated by this silence which add even more tension because if he gets catty, pretty much get get short or get killed. So having this lack of music and really this emphasize put on sound, I think really really add a lot to the tension. The lightning was also great. It manages to have great contrast be between the Obscurity and light that is from the outside window. And lastly, what I noticed was how is work was shot. As we said before, there were a lot of shots of hands in in his previous room and I think this is a film where really is a JEM. Shot of hands really gone through. We see him working with his tools, trying to create tools with whatever he has to escape, and really the camera focuses on his hands working, crafting whatever is doing. I love an cold an there more station appear as well. It's my favorite from lesson, and I think the reason for that is that this is the type of story that that is best suited for his style. I love process oriented cinema and this film is almost nothing but process, the slow, methodical way in which the protagonist is going to try to well escape. It's really the most simple, bare bones plots you can imagine. It makes sense that this would work so well with vessels stripped down esthetic. What makes it special, though, is that it also reaches something about human nature, about our yearning for FREEOM. It's quite litteral here, as the film is about man in prison, but you could argue that all of Brison's protagonists are in some kind of a prison, Becauson of the world, the old field, trapped and are looking for some way to escape, and maybe that's why this, this being the most literal version of it, is the most effective for me, as it makes that subtext very concrete and Preston style also makes the breaks in that style all the more effective. Claim you mentioned the use of Mozarts, and that use of classical music is so much more effective because of how spares and without artifice, as Reston would say. The film is outside of that. I generally find that the best way to reach something universal is through the highly specific,...

...and this film is shining example of that. It's so easy to project ourselves onto this protagonist and to feel this desire for freedom, which feeds like it means more than just, you know, escaping this prison. It's something kind of transcendental about humanity as a whole. Frontin is also the easiest brassonian protagonists like, perhaps because he says to litten, and as a result this might be the restaurant's warmest film, which so, Chris, you said you didn't need warmth from restaurant films. I kind of do. I didn't to prefer films that have some warm somewhere, and that's that's probably another reason it's my favorites, along with the fact that on a basic level, it's just a great fellow and I kind of wish Breaston had done more films like this, like his other films as well, but he's just great at it. He's just great at doing suspense, just as good as some other great Trin because up and especially in that climax, it's bread taking it in a very little sense. You don't want to make a sound yourself because she's so caught up in this quest and just I'm not sure if you mentioned it, but our lead is not an actual criminal. This is in the middle of World War II and he is in a not see prison, not a quite a prison camp, but don as the prison in France, and he is arguably presents last heroic character. And again, unlike his later this is also a man with very clear, direct motives. He has a set motive and a set plan and it puts it into action, and I think that also why it's so easy to be drawn in and root for him. Yeah, it's that simplicity, as you mentioned. It what a clear goal, not to any complicated person to get behind right. It's pretty easy to do hood, for someone to escape, and that really measures well with the simplicity of personal style. Dosn a matching foreign content, which I think maybe is way it's his best film. Moving from the film, that seemingly is the point of the best present film here, and I would agree. In my top three persons for sure, but the film has perhaps most often talked about, along with Baltasard is pickpocket, which, at least to me, yes, I said earlier, in some way it seems like a bit of a completion of his style. This is the point where Preston starts to feel like breasalm and and indeed it's sometimes even referred to as the first real person film. That the warmth is Golm and the bleak determinism is clear. Michelle can't help himself from the stealing. He's drawn to it. But even though his eyes are so off putting, even though the film can clearly becalled this on tropic in so many ways, I think it does carry on with it a lot of the suspense that we felt in a man escaped, because the the handplay again, the work of the hands as they we steel, as they pickpocket, is incredible. And it just to compliment Preston on how we Muche Duc. You actually hide real pickpockets. For the the pickpocket seems it's it's incredible. It's like a dance. And the way that you can quit so much suspense simply from using close ups of hands stealing wallets and that the techniques used, it's something, I would say, some thing almost transcendential. I mean this out of this world, just the degree of complexity and simplicity. Yep, totally. Yeah, I think it cooked in the man escape are very, very similar films. The music. That is very similar in both films. The film only as one musical piece. Don't remember of the top of my hand to the composer is but yeah, it's also a musical piece that we will hear three times or maybe for time throughout the film, just like in a man escape. There's also this narration over the film and the main protagonist is also writing a diary. I think it's interesting because it's something that we will see later on also in his in his films. Going back to pick pocket, I think it's very shot, which quite similar to a man escape. I think I still prefer a man escape to pick pocket, even though I love both films. The tension is obviously extremely present here as well, due to the lake of music in the focus on sound, just like in the man escape, and also to the fact that the police is very present in the film. So I think it's it's also interesting press on the night...

...that the US an influence. A lot of critics has compared it to crime and punishment and as press on adopted does the ask. He twice later in his career least was a little inspired and consciously, because the way that Michelle reacts to the policeman is with the same kind of what, for you say, larger than life make alumnia he has. Even though he's a pick pocket and even though he's acting out of pure impulse, he seems to have this underlying philosophy that he is somehow superhuman, that he somehow allowed to get away with things that other people shouldn't be. It's really off putting for a character, but it works. It also puts it into this kind of intellectual cat and mouse game with the police inspector. So, just to get back to the music, the music is baby leaf, whose own renaissunds French composer, Pipa Gett, is when I have a little trouble with. I enjoy the actual pickpockets aspect of it, what you mentioned, the cat and mouse, also the ideology, as you said, that's kind of used to justify his imports. It's actually he to get back to hitchcock for a second, very similar to what the protagonists of hope discuss and test to do with. You find that about in philosophy in general and play too, and et CETERA. where I have trouble with pickpockets is that it's not only about that. I mean that's only all. You talked about, the parts of the films I liked, but there's also a whole emotional aspect to it with his relationship with this woman. But that's whole. That takes a lot of the film and I think it doesn't work at all with the way pressone AP proaches it because, yeah, the the way he fails people, the way he directs actors, it just doesn't lend itself to very emotional storytelling. And one of the things that I always mentioned in reviews of this film that are positive is something about the ending, which is supposedly this very powerful scene, and to me it's doesn't really do much. I don't know, I like pickpocket, but barely. Just because of those people get scenes which I used a great I think there is his attempting to make his side work for small story that isn't well suited to it. As far as concern, I guess we're spoiling the film because, yeah, I would like to discuss a bit the ending, smaller warning. So, yeah, what happens is, you know, he leaves to England for two years and then come back and this woman as a kid from his old friend who left her. Yeah, I would agree that the romance, let's say, part, is not the most interesting aspect of the film. The big pocket seems are obviously the main focused on of the film. I think it's still an interesting relationship and I think deserved to have a place in the film because it's just shows how emotionally detached is from everyone and even though there is this woman around him and is friend, and usually in films you have this, when you have this a triangle, let's say, between a woman and two men, the two men will be fighting for here he just, you know, he's not interested in that kind of thing at all. All he wants to do is pick pocket. You know, it seemed that he is not only doing it as a mean to survive, but also because after a while he seems to do enjoy it, to enjoy the complexity and to get a kick from simply from from doing that. And regarding the ending, it's not very powerful ending, I would agree with you. I still seek it's a pretty good ending. I guess he even though he knew that the guy is betting with is a policeman, or at least that something is strange, because he has a lot of money and it's not the horses he betted on. The fact that he is still can't refrain himself, let's say, from dealing in this pocket really, I guess, shows a lot about his character. Even though he said that you would take care of the kid and the woman, it seems that he can't help himself. Yeah, I agree, but I guess the way you describe a relationship. You say he's not very emotionally attached. Right, but the issue is that, because that's the way, but there s films people, no one is emotionally attached to anything. It seems right. You don't get the feeling that she is that emotionally attached to anything either, because she is giving kind of the same type of performance. Really, don't you know? You Disagree? No, it's not. It's not that I disagree, I just I guess that even Joe, even though she doesn't show it, I guess she's still a bit attached to him. I guess she wouldn't come, come back to him that often if she wasn't, if she really didn't care. Yeah, I guess that's why it doesn't work. We do, I for me,...

...in that I don't really get a sense of why she actuation ups and and same from the other male character. Well, I guess it's time say with to the cooler show effect, to the feeling I about from orch inputs that she was in love with him to a lot, to a large extent, why he's pathetic. Exact. Yes, yes, it's true, but this is one of the things that really bothered me and the first time I worked the second time and I think it's it's really is what I talked about earlier with what to me, is also what presents rises to do with just the way focus on the characters to misinterpreted. The terminism, and it's kind of almost out putting is there, which is just that it's so brutal. It's as a brutal expression. I think that with the characters of Joan and Jack, who are the woman and the friend, that they are almost like this moral influence on him as well. They do try to save him in a way, even though they're not necessarily even know what he is going through. They try to talk to the tried to get him on the right path, but he's always Christian them off and I think that there's a contrast between the more open modeling done of that, I'm sure if you can call the love interest, but the more open way he works with the character of down and the very off putting way he works with the lead in Michelle. That that makes that contrast possible, that makes her seem more human, because always see from Michelle is just pushing people away from him. It just has this complete lack of care for anything in the world and I think in contrast everything else almost seems warm. Okay, I can see that. You mentioned, by the way, the mission tropy, and that's also why, to me, I don't really late this film a lot to man escape. I think of it more as being kind of draft for Lah. But I mean it's also because I like that and I think you mentioned that you had seen the films up to Muchette and then Lachauan, and I think that this kind of loads on that's is also something we see in a lot of his smaller films from the S as well. So when I think president and later present, that's kind of what I think. Like the films he made at the pick pocket, which all, almost of them kind of build on that misanthropet that you see in pick pocket and lush aunt. Yeah, only seen after pickpocket, of mission knows Abatazza, Muchette and La on. So. But but to move on the trial of the m of art which, honestly to me is its most extreme film and it's also one that really drives move to want to narrow the kind of story of Bresson where he, you know, his stars with the anxious of sin and ladies of the park and just slowly cuts away more and more and more story until he's just showing the absolute essentials. I mean, unlike whenever its later films, we will be focusing on, you know, doors opening in, people sitting and various other situations. Here, anything that you be considered fluff is just tuted. It is adapted directly from the core transcripts off the real trial and breast essentially cut so much that it couldn't even make an eighty minute film. The film is holy is sixty five minutes. You essentially only get the testimonies off John of ARC and a few statements and questions from the inquisitors and people visiting her. That's it. It's her in court and in her cell. That's all we see. The scenes cut almost immediately as a line is spoken, sometimes just as sentence finishes. It is so brutal in the expression. When I say it's his most extreme film or press is most extreme experiment, I don't think I'm accaggerating at all, and it's just such a different ristual and cinematical experience and almost anything else that exists. The question, of course, we we left this is does it work? Good question, and I it's also of him. I rewatch this week. I think I liked it a bit less this time around. As you said. Yeah, it's very much is most extreme film in the sense that it is the most minimalistic approach to film that he did. We only have this dialogs and that sets about it. Even that they are a bit of movements here and there. You you see her walking from her jail to the court room and then we see them going into her jail cell. So there are still a bit of action going on, but it's only for a few seconds and the rest is pretty much just talk and talk and that that's that's about it, even though there is a little subplot between you and...

...of art and one of the priests who's trying, I guess, to help her by making some small signs to her. I hope you you, I see what I'm talking about. The young one. Yes, yes, to worry. Yeah, okay, okay, Great. Yeah, it's just a little subplot thing that has not that doesn't really add anything to the story. But yeah, I guess it's something here else to be looking after in in the film. I guess I was a little bit less interested this time around hearing the dialogs, because the dialog are obviously the most important part. Regarded to use a music, it doesn't really have any music eitherres this time the only music that is used is a military drums. So it's not well, I don't I don't know if it's a famous rhythm, but I don't think I did's before. So we went from this classical pieces to just stripped down, bear minimum war drawn type of music, which I sort add to this minimalistick extreme approach of the film. So overall it's it's a good film, but probably not one that I would consider is the best. After a rewatch. Yeah, I mean I think this is one of his really films, for sure, but it actually grew for me on WEA, which I we watched it a couple of months ago before we even planned this this episode, and I was just really interested in that extremity and in that the depiction and from standpoint of a minimalistic exercise, it's incredibly impressive. But I also think it does have a decent amount of power and I think it also, I suppose I was wrong a little bit earlier when I said that lead in a man of scapes is the last herow way wrestling character, obviously John of art. This place a great degree of heroism and persistence in this film as well. And as present was at about Christian I really read something that's was additional into this dis betrayal, because if you do have a turn of the sensuality in a little way, but the same time the motions are so stripped down as well, there's just almost no essence of what we consider performance. It's it's been that this is an experience, it's an extremely cut down, really blood UN experience that it still, at least me, carried a lot of power with it just because of that. Yeah, I definitely agree with that. I think it's a powerful film and from obviously a very powerful character. I think it's also interesting to see that most of the film about Joan of Arc or film that, well, at least the most famous ones, are one that focuses on trial, because what is obviously is this one, and the other very famous film about you and of Arc is the one from a higher from the twenties, and I think it's interesting to see that both more of them focus on the trial and not what she actually did, the battle she took part of and your life, but to just what that one trial and sentenced to to death. Just to jump in, one of the reasons, I think that both of these films are so focused on the trial is also because it's we have a choice of it. I mean we have the transcript basically from the trial, and so that's the thing we know about for sure about shunivox. That's also why it's so important and often represented. Yeah, I forgot about about that, but I've at the very beginning of the film it says that the dialogs are taken directly from the manuscript that we have. I think there are cop perhaps a couple of lines from the pre thrives, the helper that are not in the core privacies. Every line of dialog is a Writt Down Line of dialog, just repeated very about them. So it's definitely unique exercise in that regard. Anything out of the coach would be sectional. Which one. Sorry, I do think out of the trial, you know, I don't know. There are scenes in the prison rights. That's what you said in the Sun. I think. I think those are actually recorded as well, because the essentially is the priests coming down and there's even once in they're saying what they should write down. So I think they're still writing down everything she says to them. So it's it's just essentially all just taking rebut but them, and there's cut down. But obviously when you do something this extreme, and I think Lansot to luck, which will discuss a little bit later, it's not the example of going extreme and a completely different direction. This was in many ways a cinematic deadn like he couldn't even do more than sixty five minutes. Like it's a bit of a it's a bit of a complete trap. I really could have, you know, started making short films again and he could have maybe, I don't know what, he could have adapted to try to make features like maybe the entire Bible, which was actually his. You did want to make the book of Dennisis as its final project and wasn't able to. But it's just it possible to really continue down this trial much further, which is perhaps why almost hard boltas are,...

...or which is called in English, my friend, Baltas are, a lovely, lovely adventure film about the young girl and their best friend, the donkey, going with great adventures together. So different. Now, for anyone worst outs in the field of this is that I that was a farce. I've this. It's one of the bleakest films press on every day. That's an other example of extreme miss and droppy and brutality, even animal cruelty, where essentially frames all of humanity as opposed to this almost saintly donkey a name Botas are, and this is also the film I referred in beginning, where time essentially is minimized as you just travel through decades of Baltasar's life and they can fade in together and you don't know exactly where you are and you kind of get this left into various owners and it's just this story of this don't keep being mistreated over and over again, and there's a lot of beauty that I think, honestly, frying back to the coolish are effect that, don't? They give it an incredible performance. But yeah, I think it's basically the best example as of the condition of the sex that's as are in Dushan I think you said earlier, to that donkey. It's really the both perfect prestol an actor and others. Have to include that quote of you met here, because that it is a mean yeah, but, like you said, you said she wasn't estematic. Did end and he had to get out of it. But in a way he goes even done deeper the rabbit hold by getting rid of, you know, human protagonists. Yes, it's true and it's it's reversed too, because he refused to cast an untrained donkey. So he refused to cast a trained donkey, because you thought all the Qui Trud tell he's acting skill. Those vers to really, but I shall have no professional not even the donkey. Is it only one donkey? That's also impressive. If that's the case, I believe so. Yes, yeah, it just took it back to us for a second, to the Kurdish of effects. I think maybe the one scene that I would use to illustrate the Koreish effects just in all of cinema would be the scene where Baltazza is going into the circus and press on Kid. He cuts from the various animals in the circus and back to Beltaza and you really feel like he is amused or angry or afraid. That it's really strongly feels that way it is to me, which of course is completely nonsense, and I think it's very, very impressive scene in that respect. But I did say he was going away from human protagonists, but that's not quite true because of course, in was about Tasa you have a Jazemski who is the real protagonist, I would say, and you mentioned earlier that he didn't like his actors doing other things. Well, obviously Angeem ski did other things later and I think it's a testament to how good she is as an actress that she manages to kind of break through his time right. She manages to still communicate emotion while still a doing essentially to what Gresson is doing, and I think that's what makes it a great film. I Love was about Tazza and it's not a thing that is obvious for me to love, because I couldn't. I mostach by on man escape. That's a sweater. It's real process focused. It's the kind of thing I loved. I usually but this, this isn't, and I think it's really just and ski that brings me in and that gives me that way to appreciate it, despite the intense weakness as you as you describe it. I mean the boyfriend character. It was a madam, might be the most evil person ever portray them screen. I don't know, attist in the west of film. I think I agree. I really agree. I mean all of the means miss entropy of presence later film. I can think of one character that that makes me low tim more than more than this one, and I also completely agree. Regarding me, as seem Skay, I mean her performance there, and I guess it's really hard to talk about performances in presence films, so I think it's passed very to talk about presence, but her presence and a kind of emotional resonance and strength you just get from seeing her essentially portray someone so weak, so surrendering and just consistently more and more beaten down as well it's incredible. I think she really stands out as this, but it sounds symbol of this film and everything back at it is that performance. I did rewatch that over the last week as well and honestly it went down a little bit in my estimation, largely just because the first time I couldn't help the sympathize so much wait her character, Marie. Well, this time it was more clear that she was going as well, less as a victim as oppose. That saw more as as accepting what was happening to her and going into what was happening to her, which I guess made emotional restaurants a little...

...weaker and perhaps my most restaurants to watch the donkey itself longer. But but yes, I mean shee. That's such an incredible job in this movie. See, and the reverse actually. We talked about it with Muchette, but I think because she is the the architect of her own demise, I think that makes her a better character or when I find it easier to empathize with, actually, because samply characters that get tortured by circumstances, I don't know. We see at a lot in film and I often have a little trouble with it and I think obviously she has a pretty terrible time, but the fact that she she has this attraction for this guy, she is really driven by her own desires and I think that's much more interesting than someone who is more passive and just a victim. One thing that's unique about this film, at least in the ones I've seen, is is belt as are and to have this audience circuits right, because the other Preston protagonists they always really active, the ymage driving the plots, but if you see but as as the protagonist here, he's just the audience sorro gets, and I think that as that helps the film not feel perspect prescriptive, right, because there's some way is interested in morality. He's interested in basically how bad humanity is, how sinful it is, but it doesn't feel like he's walking your figure at you, in part I think, because he uses this device of that ts are, and I think what you say about the etmecive character also really ties in a way the determinism that is really in full flow in Breton's work now, in the sense that, against her best of all being in every way, she keeps making these really bad decisions for herself. Yeah, you could see Tis the terminism, and I'm sure from what you use seem to say, person would see that way. But you could also see it as just being, on the contrary, rights making the bad choices. That's maybe the best example of free win that you don't think rationally and you don't do the objsting, you do universe anyway. Again, I think what's makes the strome great in part for me is how open it is to interpretation. I think you completely right, and this is something we talked about it. There's other films as well, if we can read so much into them simply because so much it stripped away, and to continue the exercise in stripping things away. I think you also didn't mention that this is the first film Reston did without either heavy monolog or narration. It is a film with well, with an animal protagonist that doesn't speak, and I'm not sure if you can say really takes it further in the companion piece, which is Richetti made these two films essentially, I to do back to back in six nine hundred sixty seven, but it's certainly going in the same direction. I mean, someone who often like to think of CARE Director's journeys as more of a story. This almost seems like made it the wrong way because in Michette he has a human protagonist, a child who doesn't speak, at least not much. It's very not communicative and stripped down, and it seems like the next step from that, in terms of how little do we know of our protagonist, would have been the donkey. But oh well, let's just accept that and say that Michette and I think we can disagree about this, because you said it's also different from pickpocket, but I still see that almost loads on this in Muchette's eyes, and that was the thing that really pushed me away from both this film and pickpocket the first time I saw them. Seeing it again now, I think it's a wonderful, wonderful film, but it is so bleak, it's so brutal, it's so crude in just the way presents it's lead character, it emotions round it, how she reacts. It's really a powerful, powerful blow and and and certainly shows just the kind of again power and brutality the present could evoke with his minimalism. Well, I guess I see what you said about people get you said that his protagonists we're kind of lowesome from that one times, and I don't think that's the case. We who should at all all this. That's not how I read. It's kind of wish I re did that way, because I think I would like the fem better if I thought her character was more complicated, because to me she's just a victim. Unfortunately, that's that's really a nice see and maybe that's why I don't like the Fem as much as you do and like it. But yeah, to me it's kind of an exercise in torture, Poon neether not miseray ports that that I said attack, and it makes me think of the dad then actually, which aftermakers, that I sometimes have someone with. But I think Josettea is kind of like a better, better take on that story to me, becaause Pesasy, because Rosetta is a complex character, which I don't get with...

Musha, but it sounds like like you do. Yeah, for sure was it. I was sorry, for sure that I was largely influenced by by bushet. Yeah, I would be shocked if it wasn't, and I mean their ends are one of the few directors who could in some way be tied to prestorm were directly as well. I think that it's one two films that everybody were calling Prestonians did that high is just firmly, firmly established. But I'm not sure if I see her as more of a active proteconist. I certainly agree that things happened to her, but I think when I say lots of I don't necessarily mean that she is loadsome. I think it's more a case of her loading the world around her, because he lives in this extreme mystery. She's this three eated by her father, her mother is dying, she doesn't get love anywhere. As you see, she doesn't really communicate with the world around her either, and she seems belonging or looking for some kind of love or acceptance. She can't even act properly in class. She's pushing everyone away from her, just as the lead in pickpocket when she's forced to sing, you know she's just starts crying. She can't really communicate that. I know Preston hated symbolism, but I don't necessarily think he hated metaphor, and you have these scenes where or earth is not Meta for showcasing and what characters want to believe interaction, and you have the scenes outside where you know as soon as they get out of school. This happens twice. She runs away from rest of the class and she attacks them with dirt and the thing she trolls the dirt at are things like handbags and perfume and perhaps all of the things that she doesn't get there, doesn't enjoy, the defining things in life, if you will, and it's just this utterly and completely pained and tortured character, which is right. I think you're calling you torture porn is actually quite quite the fitting. I guess I would agree with both of you. On Mushett, I think I liked it way more this time that we watched him then the first time. The main energy buship is obviously vary Gressonian. She'sn't truly open to the to the word, and there is one of those some things going around her, and she isn't living in a very happy environment, as as we said, and I guess what really makes her interesting in that, even though she's rejecting everything that is around her, she's still a child, and I think it's the first and only time by son really had a child as his main protagonist and just just like the donkey, is powerless though she is as well. She she can't really you know, she's young, she can't really defend herself. She is almost alone in in the world. Even though she has people around her, they don't really care for and well, the only character that will, I guess, care a bit for her and well being will be a man she will meet later on in the film, in the second half of the film, where she will spend the night with with him in his cabin, I guess, on the rainy night, and she will care for him all the throughout, through the night, even when he has some kind of epileptic seizure, I think, as she was for him, singing for him and just caring about him the way she cares for her mother. I guess that's the only time where person character will care as much for another person, well, at leastince his earlier work. Yeah, AH, but I think this relationship between her and Arsen is also a really troubling though. It's obviously an adult is obviously has very big psychological problems, and there's also this. I don't think you're I want to spoil what happens to them but there's also this sexual element there which can be deeply disturbing. Also how she reacts to that, and I'm not sure we want to spoil wish at the ending, I think is very troubling for me. But it's just this cold and calculated, almost by the numbers, way that she moves her to watch a specific reaction the decision, and it's I think it was me more this time than last time. But there's the bleakness and coldness of this film. I mean perhaps large ant is colder and bliquer and darker, but, Mr Chet, this is certainly second in line, I would say. Yeah, without saying where this is when we get to the end, it feels inevitable, I guess, back to the Terminism, as you mentioned, even though, yeah, it's it's hard to talk about it without spoiling it. I guess she had faith, let's say, in a said that things will be different with him because of what you did.

They would maybe, maybe she imagined that they would know you would take her away, and I guess the ending shows that things are not the way she imagined them at first, and maybe that would explain what happened in the last scenes of the movie. I know it's quite vake sits and like that man, it's very old. It's the reality is because it without without reallying flood elements also, yeah, agree and that I really just think that it just showcase how pain and tortured is by the world arounder, that she's just willing to cling to any kind of closeness, no matter what it is. Now moving on to our next film. Here it has, as I suppose, some of the similar thematics to return, but a little bit in reverse. Now a gentlewoman, or in him do, is brest songs first color film and it also starred and acts will go on to become quite big Dominic Sunda. So it's two actresses in very close, close timelines that, you know, you could also say broke presence heart in getting quite large careers afterwards and some up had a much larger career than we have. Some skate. But in terms off I think this is an interesting film to see because it's often considered one of the lesser b songs and it returns the kind of verbosity of some of his earlier films where it opens up with Sanda's characters suicide and then we get essentially the history of it through the telling of her husband as it tries to come to terms with what has happened. We have narration and you have flashbacks in very, very similar way as in its older films. But I suppose an interesting thing again here is that while in his earlier films it was characters telling their own story and then not, and then characters not being able to speak, in at the end of woman, it's someone narrating the story of someone else. So you get this real situation where he's trying to understand Dominic Santa's character and we try to understand there, but the person telling the story is not her. So it's distance really one step further, would you say? Some of that, like Zim skiplings, something new, something different to to ther performance. Yes, actually I think she's also one of those actors as or actors who managed to break through breath and style that she does what he wants, but he still hasn't this degree of charisma and aura that really works for the characters. It the care to feel, a perciplication of the care to just feel so much stronger than it perhaps otherwise really doesn't feel like they're dead in the way that person with perhaps have shot some of his other characters. She is noticeable in every scene. Let's just put it like that. The funt that the film is in Corner, I think is very interesting. It's his first film, is in Connor, as you said, and it's such a huge contrast in the son's career between the black and white and the color because, as we said, is films are usually extremely bleak and very stripped down to the bare essential and the black and white cinematography just added to this feeling of almost coldness and minimalistic approach. Here he decided to film in colors and from what I remember is films are pretty colorful. Actually, he decided to not extremely cold colorful, but he decided to use colors to his to his advantage in his in his films, which I guess is a very deliberate choice because obviously we could. He could have started making color films pretty much since is beginning as a film director in for a tree, even though it was it wasn't very common to to make film in color back then, I guess it could have still do it and you could definitely up done it in the later on in the the S. So I guess it's it was deliberate choice for him to stay in black and white because atmosphere, I guess he wanted to create easier to do in black and white, and now that is going to color, I guess he wants maybe to express something different. He actually resisted going into color for a really long time. It was not come with with the move to color, and I think it's obviously the The Times put seeing him to take that step while he still accepted went into it full steam. My head it's it was not perhaps what he would have preferred to do if get stuck with his original vision. Okay,...

I didn't, I didn't know that, but that's okay. That's that's interesting. So I guess you would e could have made the entire films in black and white so that they would have been there. Would have been interesting thing. I guess some of his films are better in color than then black and white. But yeah, honestly, looking at his filmography, the rest of his philography that have been in black and white into wouldn't makes that much of a difference, I guess. So it is true, but the color does work as well and I think it one of the things that really strikes me with a tent woman. Is it's gentleness in a way. It is really so slow moving and again it returned to a few of his other films. It doesn't feel as harsh, it feels more sympathetic, it feels more central. That's probably largely due to some does performance and showing us the kind of internal pain this character is going through and this being so separated from both per husband, from love, from whatever you think this character might be looking for. I mean that's the thing. We don't really know. We just know that something is severely wrong. We don't really know her story. We only observe it through her husband's words, but there is just this quiet, melancholic pain, if that just present that at all points in someone's performance, and it's absolutely beautiful. And one more thing, because I don't know, we haven't seen this for yet, Mat your but you made a fantastic job. The donkey us the perfect evers an actually did say that if someone hadn't stopped him, he probably cast, you know, tabletop. Next and essentially and essentially in this film, he cast doors. Not Doors. Is Something Presson has worked with a lot. tillow showing hands, allow showing hands, opening doors. He also perhaps inspired by stay in the prison camp love, showing a bit of a captivity. It is shooting through bars or fences, and we see that a lot in this film as well. But I think I have never been more aware of Preston store. It starts with the door opening, it ends with the door opening. In some scenes we see characters going to two, three different doors. Several scenes are shot through glass doors. It's just doors. Really work through all of it and well, again present hated symbolism. I think he it must have been a conscious decision in terms of just the emotions of boxing in the character. And say the last scene ends with a door. It's not a door, it is pro casquet being closed, but it's a very similar effect and this idea of is lead character, of being so boxed in, closed up and always these doors being closed and open. It has a really interesting effect in this film. And not to mention that one of the main object that's say in the man escape, is obviously the door that he has to crack through in order to escape. So yeah, doors are probably something very important in his films. Yeah, it might not be on purpose, you never know. I do think it gets back to the idea of discussed earlier, about all of his main characters being prisoners of the world in a sense, either literally prisoners, but even in the urban airs are kind of imprisoned. Yeah, it's yeah, I guess it's true. I guess it also is accentuated by the fact that the characters usually are not like moving a lot, making like those moving around their arms or anything. It almost it always looks like that arms are straight and close to their body, which I guess almost looks like they're in a well, not in a box, but that their movement or restrained. That's a really great point as well. And I think, just to tie up this position with an observation that I do not make myself but which is said about film a lot, is that tying this to resons ideology of wanting cinemaut to bea something completely different from every other art forms. Of course, as you know, he'd tested the words in my hindsel itself, and you know, it's all that that's film place preferring cinematography. It is still the actually ties in theater. He shows theater on bring he shows people reading, it shows people listening to music, he shows people going to receive him the looking at various forms of art. So it's, it has been called, a bit of a showcase of how he see them as different from these other art forms. Though that that's not something I myself picked up on that the time. I think it's worked. Bringing into the equation it is differently some something I...

...talked about, with the guards, to the acting style and also the fact that a lot of his films, especially shout about this, with jeraldacred companion to dire contra prisons and man escape. They feel like silent films at time, and that's, I think, because that that's is kind of the purest form of cinema, and the way he directs his actors is very much something you can only get away with in films. So I think that that really reinforces your point that he is really definitely agree that he achieves that, he achieves something that is uniquely cinematic through this this very peculiar way of directing actors. I guess it we be silent film, but with natural sounds. Yeah, obviously in the silence, but they kind of look like that at time. I don't know if I feel like that and yeah, I know I took to me agree, and they look like they look very much like sciting film, but there is always this the importance of the sounds around him. So yeah, that's like, which is why I say you know silent film, but using natural sounds. Maybe you know films where characters couldn't turn, couldn't speak or their voice wouldn't be picked by the the mics around, but only natural sounds. And this focus and natural sounds does tie us into the next film for nights of a dreamer, which is still completely stripped down, but also turning us to a lot of the things we know from present. You have character narration, you have characters closed off, separated from the world. It's also in color, and here the colors are absolutely incredible. I mean I think some of the shots there are almost dream light, and I suppose this is why that, despite is still be so minimalistic, so cut down in terms of the scope of human emotions, it feels like a warmer film, and I'm going to talk a little bit about the music later, but there's even musical intervals coming into the film with its almost three of magic. As he spins a love story and it might be well, I think lost you, but be is likely too Fark, but a story off love rather, and all of the very few present did, especially in this way where the love, the longing, it can be felt. In some ways it's an archetypical breast on film. In some ways it's so different. Yeah, it's extremely different from the rest of the film that he made until that point, if we exclude the film we just talked about a gentlewoman. Yeah, we Christ you will talk about the music, but yeah, I think that was one of the thing I picked up when I we watched it was the use of music. It's very modern because before that we only had a classical pieces. Here we have I'm not an expert, but I think it's a Nova, I think, which is to me seem like something more modern type of type of music. The setup is obviously great. The just the film takes place in Paris by night. It's interesting us to notice that. I think the film is very luminous in a way. There is a lot of light, even though it's taking taking place during the night. We have the lights coming from the other the loud, you know, outside in the street, but also lights coming from shops and coming from boats sailing in the center. I think you completely right there. This is what the talk about. Also the beauty of this film because while again, woman was his first color film, this is the first film where feel really used color and composed with older and composed with lights, and it feels very different now. It is such a stripped bear story and it is about a young, isolated the painter meeting young woman contemplating suicide, talking her essentially a down of the ledge and then forming a kind of relationship based on that. This woman is hopeless in love with a man who left her a year earlier and she was hoping to meet on the romantic bridge, but none of and he didn't show up. And over the next few days or another nights, these the characters meet up and it talked about their lives and they get to know each other. And what's really interesting here is that these talks are just intercut naturally within the film by music, by performances, by all the lives that cause arm around this this bridge. So you will have performers just walking past singing, you are the characters coming across people in location singing and you will have this one especially almost magical scene with the boat going under the bridge and we fall the boat and we hear the band performing on it and it's the colors are actually warm, and I think this is why, at least for me, even...

...though that performances are so stripped down, that they do is magic. There is love here. There is this additional poetry here that you just wouldn't have gotten up other revise and I think without it into potentials. It's like it's almost as if personal displaying with the Culi show effect, but with sound, but with music, and having the characters respond to the music we see and feel as well. So it's just done so beautifully. Yeah, it's it's a very beautiful film. I don't know how the fact that the main character is a painter was in how much it was influenced by Bison's own past as a painter, but I guess there is probably a maybe a connection here that both of them are artists trying to live from painting at at first when they're young adults. Something I also noticed when we were talking about the diaries before, like you know, the one in a big pocket the country priest, here the main character also have a diary, but this time it's it's not a written why, it's a spoken one. He has this magnetophone, I think that's so it's called, and is recording, well, not as much as his life, but I guess life the way he wants it to be, because, you know, he meets this woman and is obviously long with her and I guess he's what is recording is not really reality, but reality as he would like it to be. And even though he incorporates real sounds of birds and whatevery, the so when he's outside, the story he's telling is obviously not under the real one. I think it's all traghic at trajectory. It goes on and test. I think it's a famous book. But as the skin, I think it's worth noting that this was is the White Knights of the gentlewoman being raised on the little creature and just the way that with these rip numberformances and then did this so bad this performances that to wash the very end, and again I don't want to spoil but feeling it really starts to build this bit of a long burn or slowburn film where it takes a little while to really get into the central conflict of one stud really works, I would actually say in this case I'm not sure if it's despite or of that, the power of that hope, of this love. When I rewatched it a couple days ago, even do I know the ending. That's it's still extremely, extremely little spoke anyone hasn't seen it or anyone has dread the book based as such a heavy punch, let's say so. Let's just move to rest once next film, which, if we were to say that for nights of a dreamer is in some ways presence warmest, what comes next could hardly be colder and not just called almost in human. Launcelot do luck if presents take on the ARTURIAN legend, but we're odors with capture, adventure or magic. Bresson has taken his minimalism to such an extreme that what we are left with. It certainly doesn't feel like nights in shining armor. In fact, it looks and feels more like tin boxes banging swords into each other. We talked earlier of how if it call the trial of John of arc breast on one's most extreme film in terms of minimalism. Well, Lancelot the luck is a pretty good contemder. But here resent takes his minimalism in a very different direction, cutting down performance stripping all emotion and Glamor aside, leaving us which statues are models that are simply molded and moved the way he wants them to. They simply no sign of life here. I'm not going to sure how to describe the victuals. Say that they're just. I mean the rest and shoots flatly quite often, but there's just he's just taken all the beauty and magic away from the story and you left with these tin boxes, you know, clicking into each other. You left with this monoton dialog. You just left with this impassionate display are heroism and and in intrigued and betrayal as well, and it's just so cool, so simplified that, yeah, it took a lot of getting used to for me to love this film. Before I talk a little bit about it, Chris, I just sort of...

...a filmmaker who made a similar film. Let's say nowadays it's a Jan Garena. I was wondering if you've seen some of his films and if you thought that his films are similar as well. No, I don't believe I have. Actually, that's I'll definitely put his works on my watch list. Okay, well, I thought they were quite similar because they have this also very stripped down, almost non acting in a way, and one of his most famous film, which I can't remember the title and look for it a bit later on, is also taking taking place in the Middle Ages at the same time of Nostril. I know Sol dislike his films from what I remember. So yeah, but I think they're quite our original. Yeah, I'll definitely think out this. Any other I can see what I mean with it completely ript down. People not responded to this. I did not respond to the slot to luck at all. The first time I saw it it was my least favorite press on for a longest amount of time, but once I started to see more breast on, it was also the first film that I really wanted to re explore to see if it would work for me now, and it really did. I responded so much to this brutality of the simplicity of it. The experiment in itself no often swept away by style and by expression, which I suppose is what work there, but just the way everything straight down to this extent, I mean the extremity of it and the impassionateness of it. It works. It becomes powerful in the way from me, though I really struggle to say why. I think it's just sher brutality of something so stripped down. So to change a subject to a little bit, I wanted to talk about the colors. I remember the colors being very, very bright. Me May not be right term, but I remember the film being quite colorful and probably the most colorful film by someone ever did. Would you? Would you agree with that, Chris? I think I would probably say that for that wood dream is more colorful. But yes, I can do an extent. See you see what you mean? It's I mean it's also set a lot in the forest. It's has some decorate, decoration. You have the largely eusting scenes, the spectators and all in the proper garbs, etc. But I mean I just can't really think of it as as colorful. I see it as so muted in in every way. So it's hard of me to see that. By that I think you're broadly akward. Okay, so I haven't seen those ones, but I wasn't too surprised by whole relatively colorful Langen was when I watched it. It's not I mean it's not super bright, but it's not as drab as you might expect from this's World War view, and moving over to a film them that perhaps doesn't use colors that march for bath. Well, it's his fun ultimate film, the Devil, probably, which was inspired by a newspaper cutting of a suicide that ended up being a murder. It's probably my least favorite Presson is. I still think it's a really strong work, but it is probably the one film where taught his style just did not quite work, and the reason for that is that he's trying to represent that character who's in simply wants to experience as much life and pleasure as they can and then gets moved to opposition. Very most experience something else, something darker, and there are some absolutely great scenes in the film. I think the ending is really powerful, as very ironic and strong final line. But while it still works, while it's still powerful, I do think it's one of his less effective. This one that did two books by nose Toyski and for some reason I believe that the main generic reminded me a lot of just to is key character in the way that he well, you know, discuss religion, politics and try to find I guess is based in the in the world and just eventually reject everything. I thought he was a very dust to your skin character. The gotting youth. I haven't seen that one, but I do think it's kind of surprising how Gresson, who is a very religious trammaker and very internal, he is actually quite connected with his times. I mean, you knows about as are. You also have that right. You have the the boyfriend character. He's listening to the music at the Times he's he's engaging with the world around him, which also in songs like what you describe, is very much in nine with that. I think you're completely right in the section of the things. That really impresses me both about the that will probably and about four nights of a dreamer. Be Honest, it's just how the portrait of young people really seem to match up with the portrait of if not the Frenchly way of the Post Frenchly waved type of dynamics that you know we see in it. Will be the films of Mustache, or be it the films of Garrel, like all of the...

...directors coming up with the culture in the S and really contemplating on this in the s, like Briton seems to be making films with similar focuses on Neude, similar representation. It might be the minimalism again that and just wonders of the extent the user that it makes this possible. But he really seems to capture the same kind of feeling. I think we need to focus on just why. That's impressive because Presson was born in the very early one nineteen hundreds, I mean for all of the films we've been disgusting for the last half hour, hour. So like in the S, he was in his s already for this film, he was already for the will, probably was already in his mid S, and tying us over to his swan song, large ant, which feels so powerful. It's arguably his best film. Many, like many critics, would call it his best film to meet his second best, but it's just such a powerful thing that has so many great it is that's so much power. We're essentially money and handling of money again, with his hands touching money, taking money, trading money, taking the place of violence, like taking the main focus. There it which is just prettick, almost beauty, or or simply cinematic clarity and focus. And he was eighty two at this point and if you listen to people like, say, Quentin Tarantina, who with did the podcast on hasty air, I know people couldn't, can't really make good movies after sixty o care we have a director making his most powerful and best regarded works in his s and it feels so youthful, it feels so strong. It's just incredible that that he had that passion in him it to the very end, essentially, even though he died at ninety eight, in one thousand nine hundred and ninety nine. So yeah, I really it's impressive. I mean I don't think he should come into it too much. I don't really agree with Sunchino, but one of the things that came to mind watching Naha. It definitely seems like summary Film of his career. Right. It kind of combines a lot of elements that are in his previous films and does it very well. I think it's it's a very successful film. One thing I thought about watching it is where what do I think bressant is politically? He seems like a conservative and there's a shot in Lajean that made me think about that, in the way he lingers on the sign of the hotel that the protagonist checks in after coming out, coming out of prison, and the sign is little moody and at Modern Hotel, and he really, he really lingers on that. And and there's also a moment in a trial where one of the characters is defending himself by saying, Oh, he's explaining why he did what he why what he did by saying, well, The Times are changing and the new ideas going around, I thought it would be fine, and so that feeds very conservative. But I also think that bressant is not really, at least he's not reactionary, because there's no ideal time in the past for Bressant. Right even I haven't seen the film set in the Medieval era, but even like when he portrays come true life, like in was about as are and that we have a country Christ, those are not identic portrayals, not at all, and I think that makes him very interesting as a hy maker because he's hard to pin down. and to also comment on something else that that you guys talked about is modern filmmakers that kind of feel like Bresson. We mentioned a then Clem mentioned rank in, and to that came to mind watching this Hannoker, and usn't hire and different ways. I think the big difference is that the size is not provoking anything. He's just showing you something that he coldly and he's not smoke at all, which I think is also a big difference. But I feel like those two thingmakers are very much influenced by has some especially film like like Lashan, and I've been talking about this topic of where you might be in the political spectrum. I'm not sure if anyone's really written about this here. It was very quiet, I think for us, loud it was about his cinematic ideology and you points. He wasn't that loud about his political viewpoints, even though he covers a lot of more radical politics in this later films. And you think, though, it's interesting that, in large lump, essentially money is the root of evil or humans dealing with money is the root of the so much pain destruction. I mean it, there are murders in this film, there's violent in this film, but that's never really tone. What is shown is money trading hands and it's just important of money and and and the cruel did it comes from it. It's really, really impressive. and to just jump back to the very beginning of the film itself to something else that you don't really see that often in his work that, I guess,...

...ties introduced how much, if you strip away just how fast those early scenes move, you have so many characters. If you want to say that, you know that they will probably is a kind of metaphor of youth. In France. This is essentially a metaphor of or could be rathersime as a metaphor or focused or exploration of all society through the Lens of money, because you have the young, you have the old, you have these people in between, you have workers, you have the rich, you have store. On this you centually go through the entire entire class structure and the social structure that and the ages as well as all of these people make this little steps that end up devastating the character we end up following as our lead, and this is this is kind of the thing too, like he followed all these character for we don't know that one of them will potentially be our lead. All of that were given as a kind of equal importance, from the kid who went up whole siffy or going along with his friends trading falsifying notes to store owners who receive it first to the person working is for for them. This is this vamp of characters involved. Just how fast, I think all of this setup happens in twenty minutes, where the money has been trailed at the consequences, where a relief characters, the person who gets blamed for all of this eventually and and it ends and having his life destroyed, really gets caught caught up in it. It's just absolutely incredible. This how large the spectrums. I think what you said about his focus on young people is also took some goes with his determinism. Might because artists some version of the terminism where basically everyone over the age of twenty five and in these films seems very set in stone, right, and they are the ones that are also in this film at least, influencing the younger generation. Right, because it all starts with, well, it's I guess it starts with the young high schooler who wants to pay back his friend, but it's also comes from his father not paying him. Right, and especially, I think the bigger moment is the store owner who is clearly cheating, and that is clearly what insights one of them and characters to go into a life of crime. It's funny because essentially Dar Jean it could kind of be in terms of its plots, coscessive him right. It's young and fashionable character who sees other people succeed in a life of crime and he is taken by it and eventually destroyed by it. I mean you could see that way, but it's certainly does not feel similar at all. I mean, yeah, I think you could easily adapt that champ for for an American audience. The focusing in know the car phases and the violence and the brutality the great cultures. It's really short but it's really good. It kind of wish but some had don't know that. But and I guess that really showcars. We get the contention. He can do whole quickly if he really wills to, and you feel attention in that those early moments to as the money changes hands and from character to character we see the steps on this letter being followed it. It's just he can build up so much tensions so oh quickly and get so much done with so much emotion. And then we kind of take a bit of a backseat again as we kind of slow down the development. We see jail again, which is like you said, a nice compendium of prisons earlier films and this is focus on on Dale cells. He's like home, yes, and then you get into the end. I think we do in this case want to spoil the end, but before we do that I also want to talk a little bit about this how effectively violence is avoided with with the lipsus. It just cut the ways, like simple, simple cut the ways, because I think the scene that's often talked about them all of the things that struck me as most, it's just how violent that punch feels, when the older Father Puntries is quite a dult daughter in the face, but we don't see it. It's struck and we just see her handed coffee shaking and coffee spilling, and there's the violence in that shot. And you have that ro out the film where violence is just cut away in favor of either showing something entirely different or just an a lipsus which we return to something else, and it's so powerful. It's true that there's the bank scene as well, and it's something that he didn't do be found like. I think it was about that. We see plenty of wagons against the donkey. At least I'm trying to think. Is there a scene of VI don't against Umans that we see very well in in another of his films? So that's a good point. I can't really kink of, like you have obviously the effects of what's happening with Maria. Think we see in Boutars, I think we see her punched. I'm not hundred percent sure. I think so, as wedding, but you know, you completely right.

I mean even like if you look at the suicide in the opening of a gentle woman, it's very similar. There is a small fight scene in Muschet, very small one. Oh yes, of post now. Oh yeah, yeah, between austen and can't remember his name, but the other protects. So yeah, yes, but it's very short. So yeah, it's not like it's not the yeah, but I mean it's definitely something that's new. With Lajean rights, there are three key acts of violence that we only see, as you did, the results of, other than seeing the act itself, not necessarily the results. Actually we we either see something before it or after it's yeah, exactly. I think this is the thing we see in many other films as well, including evental woman, where, you know, we see her going to the Legestarre jump and see a door opening and then the share falling and that's it. And I think these kinds of shot in this kind of cutaways, is something the present does incredibly well, but I found is probably the most perfect showcase of it. And I guess you know the drug earlier about her someone wanting to make a film with the tables as a protagonist, but I guess this one has banked in as it's protagonists. That's really spot on as well. But I'm not sure if we called back the certainly the central team, and that is what shown, like I used can he works for the first twenty minutes also, because after that we can do rust track of the of the Bin. Yes, yes, but shutting to the spoiler section here spoil of warning, because after he's been to prison, our character goes out is completely destroyed. He has this kind of loads on this or not that we recognize and so many other characters, this hatred of the world and this this way of being, and he has, it meant, so many ways, been destroyed by the system and the world around him, but is taken in by this loving people, this woman who has no connection to him. The first time I saw it. I was very confusing what the relationship was between them. I thought, I told me, was his mother something similar, but no, it's just a woman who who takes him in out of sympathy and lets him live there. And I form a kind of there is some kind of understanding between the but it's so cold and then of course there's murder at some point. He was from the start, so so I chured to to attraction it. From the starts, I think we see that he follows her because he sees her with drawing money from the bank. I didn't get him. I guess it's in clear to me that she was unknown and that from the start he's planning. He has no bad intentions, I guess. Well, that's a really interesting taken int realize it would be in the money for the bank, but that money does go through it. I thought it was just trying to rob her to be honerstand that it ended up with something else. Yeah, yeah, I think that's it. Can but that's what I mean. Is He that's why he follows her at home? I think it's just random. Yes, and that Dan share really looms over all to see and feel something is going to happen. It's you can you have the tension that pressed on us so well, like it's almost like waiting. You know something will happen. is like introducing a gun. You know it knows something's gonna Happen, you don't know what. And ending is perhaps even more horrific than you might have thought. He murders every single member of that family brutally, but of course it's not shown like you have, for instance, on Lipses, where you have a dog running past these people still alive, walking in stairs and then when the dog runs back the dead, then essentially just had this dog going from room the room and someone is dead in it. It's just his methodically killing all of them. It's completely awful, but you don't see a single part of it. What you do see, though, is him carefully stealing the money from the bedroom drawer. Yeah, I think it's particular. My person what wants to say? They're it's that section that we made me think of here and Hanneko, but of nuch more restrained her version of those directors, and I think it's really effective. I think that's, you know, the religion. We see of some blood, we see and there's the cut with the axe right where he's hitting someone with an expert he seems to be hitting them not with the cutting pats. I guess that shot is really powerful and I think he there is a lot of value in not chewing. And you are speaking. I'm not sure if you're on three. It is inspired by breaston anyway, but I know that I don't call which one it is. Right now the only gifts favorite film is Breton Film. So there must be some kind of some kind of relationship there and inspiration there. I think. I guess I thought I one tail in the sense of this very pessimistic view of humanity and the way you show the hypocrisy of everyone. I don't know, obviously say they are staistically very different. No, and I think it can definitely be read completely the way you do. Have that like most extreme degree of again, lots of this like this kind of complete and utter mist and ropy and disturbing bleakness. That's there's just which I think was what pushed me away the first time I saw it. I didn't love it at all. The first...

...time I saw it I just thought it was well dumb because it was just emotions it conveye with just so offputting to me. It's so harsh, but the second time I think I've grown to appreciate that harshness far more. Yes, basically no emotions. I mean it's all purely materialistic. I mean I think we talked about earlier about his hard to pin down critically on. Maybe not a hard but not very easy. But yeah, definitely he is. He's against materialism. I think we can say that he's very spiritual filmmaker and I think his main the main sin he sees in humanity is attachment to to the world right, attachment to to cold things like money. So it which is why it seems like a combination of his career in some sense, even though it's not my favorite. But it isn't and I could not say it feels appropriate for his final yeah, completely agree, and it just looked at. Talking Hunnik is favorite film is astard battles are in. The second favorite film is loves lot to so I think that also showcase is just how many filmmakers love and respect Robert Persam. I note are Collski, for instance, also helped ver someone of us, one of the two directors in the world that he essentially would take an opinion from the other being burgman. Yeah, and you consistently have so many large masters praising him, if not an inspiration, as one of the people that they see as this the purest examples of real author I guess, in the most extreme way, in the way that the Romer and through for and all of the French new way praised, which I suppose also ties in with why the reew wave load him so much. He is something completely unique and while he dealt an experimented with so many different ways of minimizing action, that is just so hard to think of other directors. I know Clem mentioned utreen screen. We have talked a little bit about Hannek. You could mention that the dark dance, but Preston is unique voice on this own. His field are some of the most unique in the history of cinema this terms of how stripped down their house separate that they are and how they do for his list of, you know, ideological points of views of what cinema should being compressed, or rather up cinematography should be in contrast to cinema, and that's always so interesting to explore and it just gains it gives it so much power. Yes, those are those other filmmakers or have some aspects of the song, but not all of them. And one of the things I think makes him special is his ability to stay neutral, or at least that type ceded to, to not feel morelistic, even though that's all his films are about, but it never feels like he is imposing his more view of the world on you. Now we don't. I would agree with that. It's overall, when you look at his filmography, I think he's very solid to make you from the beginning to the end, and one that somehow was able to find his style quite early in the cinematic journey. We didn't make a lot of film, just like a queer key only made thirteen, but pretty much all of his films are great films that all deserve to be seen, even these lesser known and lesser good one, let's say no. I completely agree with both you. You. I think it's just the fact that past this uniqueation that makes every single film so fascinating to see and personally, and that I might have become a particularly big fan out on this rewatch. I usually more hit, nixed miss for me, but especially every single film speaks to me as something powerful, even, you know, the ones that affect me less like that. There were probably there is that incredible strength in them. Absolutely it's actually the same for me here I would the five films I rewatched. I improve my ratings on three of them, one of them remain the same and there's one I liked a bit less. But definitely all of his films are extremely great films and very unique in in cinema, at least for time, and even though some filmmakers later on as inspired themselves and their work from by Sony remains quite unique in the cinematic word. Now, for audience was listening into this. Did it this have to might be a little bit cut down, but we are at almost a three hour Mark Mal, which is longer than any film Robert Preston ever made, with the exceptions exactly, with the exception of the ever country priest, which is almost two hours. Especially everything you made was under ninety minutes. Most of them around say, is eighty two, eighty five minutes long. So it's just so stripped back and that's a kind of minimalism. I guess we did not quite succeed at reaching in this episode, but we also did something...

...we could also think was possible, and we talked to the entire tomography off brest on. I mean we are a team of people who spend at six hours, with the final product of three hours, just picking up out six films by Eric Rohmer. In this commis a proverb cycle here. We managed to actually cover person properly in a single episode, all thirteen films. Now, of course, there's so much more to be said about each of these films and they could be dived into in details, but I think we really covered just why. There's a powerful why the effect us the way they do and why Robert prestont in shooting to separate himself from cinema, setting these rules for himself, by creating this ideology, managed to create a set of films that ares so different from the norm, so powerful in their sparsity and Bareness. And one thing I haven't even thought would talk about too much in this episode, just the Cooler show effect and US reading things into his work, and that I think this is something that will continue to exist. I think it's something that to change from reading to reading in between every single person seeing one of his works, and it's one of the things that will cheep makeing the minimalist world of Robbert Preston ass magical, prectic, powerful, strong, brutal, as it is so with that said, thank you so much for listening, and Jones against soon. You have been listening to talking images, official PODCAST OF ICM FORUMCOM.

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