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Episode 37 · 1 month ago

The Minimalist World of Robert Bresson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

How much can you strip away? How far can you go? Robert Bresson did not just create his own cinematic language. He created his own cinematic ideology - striving to tear film away from the theatre, strip away all artifice and create something you could only experience through cinema.

Over his 13 feature films, and one standalone short, his career spanned from 1934 to 1983. In this episode, we will talk you through each and every single one of his films, look at what they minimised, try to understand why and above all try to express just how it makes us feel - and why it works ... or doesn't.

This is the story of how Bresson became Bresson, and how his minimalist world developed, evolved, reached dead ends and rejuvenated itself.

Timestamps:

00:00 - Intro
02:26 - Our first reaction to seeing a Bresson film
03:25 - Bresson, the canon and the French New Wave
07:21 - Things to Know Before Seeing Your First Bresson
10:59 - Short film: Affairs Publique
14:45 - Angels of Sin
18:10 - Les dames du Bois de Boulogne
22:40 - Diary of a Country Priest
29:05 - A Man Escaped
37:04 - Pickpocket
47:46 - The Trial of Jean of Arc
54:24 - Au hasard Baltazar
1:02:32 - Mouchette
1:10:46 - A Gentle Woman
1:21:17 - Four Nights of a Dreamer
1:28:00 - Lancelot du Lac
1:32:38 - The Devil Probably
1:35:55 - L'Argant
1:51:07 - Filmmakers Inspired by Bresson

You are listening to talking evictionthe official PODCAST OF ISM FOR COM, welcome back here on I'm Chris, and inthis episode it will take you into the minimalist world of Robert Preson andconfronted in all its called and calculated power experiencing. So this man's films canalmost be like going into a battle against all cinematic conventions thatthere's simply no directors, life Preson. What could he not strip awayexposition, music, emotion, violence, action even time his actors were noteven allowed to well act. He saw them as models that he as a director to moband arrange as for beautiful scenery and Enimey, yes and a niobe, there ismuch, but he abhorred the idea of post cortis. You will images to exist as agreater whole, none of Taiching, the other. He developed an entire cinematicideology and it's impossible to ignore it. But we are also interesting how hisfilms make us react, how they make us feel and- and of course they don't allmake us feel the exact same way. Even more importantly, Bresson was notalways the Bresten, we think of to day his style drew and Avalldamon ideaswere formed. New Experiments were made. That is why it's so incredibly excitingto be able to go through his entire Temora. Yes, is right. I will covereach of the thirteen feature films he made between thousand nine hundred andforty three N, one thousand nine hundred and eighty three, as well ashis sole short film for One thousand nine hundred and thirty four, and let'sdespoil that right now, it's something quite different, but before I get intoall that that man to Ducti my two, absolutely wonderful, co holes, Clemand mature, bold countryman of Bason, and just as for this first quite easy entry question toremember what your first reaction was to seeing a Robert Berson film hey.This is Clem from France. I believe the first movie I saw fromhim was what is most famous one a man escape. I really liked it. It was quiteunusual to see how straight down that say to film was how an emotionaleveryone seemed to be, but unthought were emotionless that Icould still fill the emotions and that's what that was really incredible.Hi Am mature from fens also, and I guess the first time I saw Cresolin wason a like companion or die of a country priest, but by the time I saw it, Iknew what to expect about peston style. So I guess I wasn't that surprised thatit conformed to my expectations, but it kind of interesting that, but soon tome, is not someone I was aware of beforebecoming a snifed and like most of the major French filmars, even people likehome and evats their names I was familiar with before, but as I rememberlike the first time I looked at the siton sound lists, seeing these Frenchfilms that I had never heard of was quite surprising to me. Yeah I had thesame eating. That Bacon is not at all well known here in France while well.He is in sinite circles widen in I. I love myson Yea yea. Only in Sinaiticus, but the general public haven't even heardof him. Let alone see one of the films which is weird because we have somebecause we have some like athos filmmakers that are famous like homer.I mean he's, not he's not a bartels, but but he's quite famous yeah is known,but people probably haven't seen that many of his films same goes for a goodor a Te. Ful Yeah so or those names are pretty big, but by or for some reason.Well I guess maybe it's because it wasn't really a part of the French newwave, which is quite famous here. Lady. No, I don't know, that's a really goodpoint actually, and it seems that a lot of people even sometimes confuse inwith a French new way, because a pick pocket just the fact that many of is likelyolder films before late is are necessarily the pins that come up firstyeah. But then you get something like Mushats, which is, could not be lessthat, like the French new vay and is contemporary Tis, so yeah, ok, a Picotis probably the closest artist of from what I've seen. I guess. Four nights ofa dreamer is also quite a bit new wave. In a sense, it reminded me quite a lotof what some single mark could have done. It t that's actually one of thosethings I was thinking about to. I don't...

...remember the name of the actor uses aprofessional actors course, as he always does, but that's the way hislead looks not fill with it. Will it reminds me at so much of LID and thekind of field he did with, for instance, eustace with, like the moder, an thewhore, for instance, and the kind of tradition look to reminder with a lotof the color films from De fenshawes. It's really interesting, especially thefirst time I wot e, really thought this could have been his new way. Film,though, when I saw it again last week, it did of course trikes. Yes, it is adeniably breast. An is still completely stripped down, but there's stillsomething about it. That has that kind of association and from what Iunderstand, he was one of the few filmmakers that were established thatthe French, by wave, guys kind of respected right him, Cruso Mendin, Idon't I but it but ye no to pretty much. I that is true. I think Kudariparticular loved present at Tassino, who, as obviously the main inspirationfor the French new way and Co founder off, cares to cinema when he diedbefore most opressing films were made, but he consider tire of a country placeto be the great this exercise in Fiquet is actually until that point. So I didso, I think think that's definitely a lot of lovefor for resting in the in a new way and there's a lot of love Bresson.Elsewhere too. I think, if you look at us, the second sound list he's numbereleven of all time of all directors. If you looked at, dass pictures is numberseventeen, and even though he's on her own list on ISM for him he's run thirtysix at the moment she has been as high as thirteen. So I think there is a lotof low and respect for Bresson in almost any cynophilist and critic. Anacademic circle you will people and rent it yeah is proper. Is the mostwell liked for Mak sure that isn't known at all when you exit the snailcon, which is quite quite a strange, a yeah, it's possible, I really like thethesis and its, and I think why that is the well. I'm sure we this go. Were ita bit more and we talk about this, how rich a he was in sowes house, strippeddown how different that was from their conventions, but I, before we actuallydive into his short film, which is nothing like this at all. What do you think someone who has neverseen a reson film should know we were giving it a shot? I think they shouldbe warned to not expect any acting. I mean static situation, a you know. Ithink they should be warned of that, because otherwise it could be littling,but I think that's about it really. It's I mean if you into at House film.That's really all you need to know, I think, and even though you're notacting the film are still a is for me very interesting. Sometimes he remindsme of last extreme version of Toban relywhere this lex is the same, like the this character standing and not movingand just reciting their dialogues, and I thinkby some is like that, but more entertaining in a way. I guess hemanagers in is situation the way, films and the ways character, moves and theway that tells the dialogues to to make it seem a bit trion. In a sense, that's the that's, a e interesting wayof explaining Brest I've heard so far, strobe Holie, but with more action she's like a cross between those guysand its Hedgecock, basically yeah. I can believe that it worse of his films made made methink he could have been the French hit hitchcock if he had wanted to, butobviously he had other ideas in mind. She is probably for the best I think,yeah, probably and also in some well, but we have you got at. They have co soan other. They have to live you and trying to do some hitch cock things. Soit's good that he set out on my self yeah, but do think that his idealityshould at least get how they put it, not sure how knowledgeable you need tobe about his underlying ideology. But I think it's really interesting to knowjust just what drow him to make films the way he does and the way he wrotewith actors as well can be really dumb found thing. The first time, especially,I think the first time my self in most probably pick pocket, which just rubbedme completely the wrong way with these dead eyes. Just felt at that point veryloathsome, and I didn't respond to that until much later, and I think the factthat he, for instance, would instruct his actors to well first of all not act,but he would work on them to speak in this monotone voice as if just peeringout an internal monologue. The way he would you know o try to focus on aspectof the body that wouldn't act like the...

...hands and I think, there's a lot ofadditional interesting things to know about Bresson and where it came from, including hisideality as a Christian believing in essentially determinism, but I'm notsure if that's needed to really enjoy his films is just something that makesthem more interesting to go back to. I suppose yeah and I think the religiousaspect is kind of present anyway, even if you don't know about it, it shows uppretty fast in most of his trams. I think it not all of them but yeah. It'sa fun thing to know and maybe to try to spot when you're watching his films orwere watching these films. But I don't think you need to know much about thatto to enjoy his films. I mean, I think, I've seen this entire filmographywithout really knowing about all those details and M. I really enjoy most ofhis films, so it's nice to know when you relatch them, but you can, I justthink differently enjoys them without knowing, and would that said, let's gointo the field and I think the least amount of people have enjoyed, but alsobecause Lee some other people haven't seen it, which is a fair public, hisone thousand nine hundred and thirty four short film, which is oftendescribed as a slapstick comedy, and it's it's one of those very odd early,sound films that plays a lot around with some bistol ideas. Think it's veryclever thing. It's very fresh, a little bit cute, some people that compared itto what we go was doing at the same time, but I don't claim my saying thisas well. So what are your thoughts? A fair public? Well, I haven't trulywatched it. Sadly, so I don't remember much. I remember liking it and being almostshocked that Er Bison did something as so different, because I must tell it'sprobably one of the last thing I saw of him. So I knew about him. I knew about.The type of movie usually makes so thing, this very popular, let's say it,which is not a bad thing at all, but you know very popular comedy and almosta slapstick, as you said, coming from someone who made such a trip down and very minimalistic filmwas definitely something unusual and very unexpected yeah. I unfortunately had to see it onYoutube because I don't think it's been released anywhere and may be in prose,so the quality was very poor of the print, but I can still kind of see thisa kind of ritual man she give us working on as well. There were therewas so many really cool ideas that you wouldn't really associate with Restat,there's, especially one scene, where I believe it's prime waist or who'sholding a speech in front of a statue of himself and the state is yawning andhe yawns this the identical yawn and in thees this ocean of duplication thathigher audience start to Don as well and there's just so many. I was almosta pleasant little visual magnets and this playfulness here that shows arecompletely different. Breton Yeah Yeah totally. Regarding the quit of theprint, I don't think there is a good quite print anywhere because from fromwhat I remember, it was believed to be lost and it was found in the T E s. Wefound a copy somewhere, so I don't think that there are that many copiesavailable will good quality and so far I don't think anyone has taken the timeto remaster it. Probably because of demand is not that that is, but maybeone day if someone makes a huge box set of every boson films, maybe maybe theywill take back that short film and remaster it. Maybe it will be on t knowbetter to watch it in a good quality and lucrative theories available now,even though it's totally watchable no, I definitely agree there. It couldremercis this. You Know Wonderful Triumph of the thirties that no onethought it was. It is a bit hard for me to judge because it is quite crowded,but that's luckily not the case for any of his feature films. I think therewere a few bad copies going around for a while, but today everything seems tobe released on BLU ray or gotten proper quaterin releases et ce, which is agreat joy, and that includes his very first early films from the s which arethe films that are, I suppose the least person on, and also the least talkedabout, probably as a result, but they are all the same incredibly interestingI mean we can jump straight to angels of Sin Or, if I can announce itcorrectly, the Arnhold re perch, which was his very first film from onethousand nine hundred and forty three,...

...a already handling and working withreligious bothies. It sat in a nunnery all the looking at human nature and,surprisingly, to me at least already stripped quite down, you could clearlysee a lot of signs of the director present will be, though it also strikesme as I'm much warmer and, I less to say, I'm much less misantrope e of theworld. Okay, so before the police gets to you Chris just protect you Liz an toPSI is how that's pronounced. Thank you. I was waiting for him for that. Formature, I mean it's all I can contribute,because I haven't seen the tostes user. Okay, I meant is to give up really quickrundown of what the film it's about. It's set in a reformes nunnery,essentially that takes in ex prisoners and essentially tries to redeem them,and we follow a much larger character gallery than we usually due. But I saidthe drama is set around this young idealistic woman coming in to one and ameeting is one woman in prison who she wants to essentially save, and it thefocuses the way these two characters interact, how much the prisoner loathsthe numb. But at the same time you start to see how some of our effortsmay be working. It's still strict down film, it's still a very quiet film itit still has so much mait individuals and just some of the same focuses onthe hands, and it's interesting as well that this is the film where thepersonal later said. He discovered a lot of what he wanted to do. He startedto wile filming see how on to strip down performance, but it didn't reallywork with professional actors. Apparently there's trying to get adeborded even result in tears, which is which is probably why he wanted to turnto non professional actors later. I don't remember the film that that wellto discuss it, but I think it's interesting to know that he by soleslife, I was a prisoner of war just before making the film. So I wonder howmuch that experience, influence and prowit. I remember it's film that isshot mostly or completely inside. So do you think Chris maybe is experience asa prisoner for as influenced the way he made the film. I think that'sdefinitely true, and I think this case Propho and the idea of prison issomething that runs through so many of his films as well. I'm a going to talkabout, presents characters or models in prison several times the in this episode, but,but I think, you're completely right that that kind of more close Efobicloke does help anciens in quite a bit, though it's also at least in come for,as in present slater film a lot warmer, but that's something you can't reallysay for his Bak film, ladies of the park, or again in an no re calling onthe French language police, the dam De bar Di Bologna. Is that correct, mydear? Ah, that's good, that's good! Finally, okay! This is good. This isgood, but I think, what's really real to anyone who wants to try to see brealcareer is a kind of clear trajectory really discours. What they want to doan this is at least me. I feel that takes it that completely differentdirection. It's far more dialogue based, is far more character. Oriented you really get motives of the characterdrawn out into this elegant game. To the extent. To almost that, I would saythat it almost feels a little bit more, like a Cotolai, no cook, to rout thedialogue of the film, even though Bresson role the scenario and you canreally feel so many similarities to allow of the of the worth cooktown init's just, I would honestly say it's the least Bersonin film of outside formission, first short, that he ever directed yeah. I would definitely agreewith that, and I think his first two film or the film that has the lesspersonality that could have been made by your by anyone. You mentioned cooktoo, but you could have been cooked or another Famae, which is not thecriticism. You know he was his first two films. So obviously you know it'svery rare that, from the very first film of a maker manages to create, ison filmmaking way, there's still two good films in my in my book, but yeahdefinitely to two that hours or less brison regarding the second family toBen Bulon. It's quite it's a quite good film. It's yeah, really much very muchrelies on dialogues. As you said, them is Athem that rea really feels strangein my sons, philography, because there...

...is all this aspect of revenge andresentment that the main character is feeling for a lover who is leaving her at thebeginning of the film, which I believe is not really a theme we will see lateron. In my soul, films, you complete the right clam and especially, if you thinkabout his ideology and the history on the terminis M, I mean later in hiscareer with essentially just stript away motives. I wasn't that interestedin motives any more, but let Dame de Batbori in tens all about motives. Theentire scenario situation built is on the fact that this woman has beenscorned or it's even in the process of being scorned, as he learned at thebeginning and then essentially this science. This trap for her lover andit's such a cool Tom, but it's a darkly, comedic film in a way as well and again,this is more elective of Coco. To be honest, but just the games that areplayed the carefulness of the scenario, the way essentially Helen played byMaria Casara. Really this essentially commands every single, and then it'snot fate. It's for as essentially that's just guiding. Everything in thismovie is playing them like a fiddle, and it's it's just seeing her do thingsthat are seemingly good, but with the darkest intentions and the way thiswoon and that's such a joy for me to see it. I really think this is a greatfilm and I honestly one of them, in my opinion, at lease I might be sideConover al most, better French films of the forties as well. Just such a eventhough it that's almost nothing to do with out Preston would do later. Wejust such an interesting course such a fascinating play between characters,and I with also such coldness and darkness and again really bleak, subtle,humor. It's a very interesting and different film that that I think anyone who might be ignoring it and not seeing it simply because it has thisreputation as not being Bresolin, which is completely true, just go and see itanyway, at least that's my opinion. Yeah. Anyone who likes French film tomsthe S and s should definitely see it. It sounds like Maria is, is really thereason to see it. Certainly it could be mine. I think she's a great lot very ca,Ismatic very theatrical actress and it sounds weird to have her in Boissorting. But I guess it's not that much regales on firm, a hole that makessense, yeah, she's, quite she's, quite good in the film, and I think it'sworth nothing to that I mean this is also based on the constraint thatpresent were placed under the really couldn't secure funding for filmsunless you had professional actors or an actresses, and that's why it alsotook him such a long time to be able to do what, in my opinion, it's hismasterpiece, and we might do it. It's we little bit on this, but diary of acountry. Priest was in fact his very first film with non professional actorsand while it's certainly still not exactly the Breton, you would associatewith pick pocket or lachant. It is such a powerful, powerful film, focusing in on this exact country,priest and seen through his well his actual diary. You see him right thingand reflecting on the events. As we see the events it may just be the coolershow effect. The tactic is still really stripped down, but there's just so mucha melancholy in the performance of Claude Ladu, who would actually go onto become a a professional actor as well. But this is the motion conveyor.It's absolutely incredible to me: It's just such a powerful, powerful filmyeah, so I don't think of it as being his masterpiece, but I do think I guessit's. The first thing I think about with a question. Maybe because it's thefirst one I've seen you say it's not the person we think of, but to me it isagain, maybe because it's first exposure, but I think the centralperformance here is like the typical performance by your person, protagonistand it works really. Well, I think, as you mentioned, the colish of effect isreally working here, as it will be in his other firms and we can project alot onto him, but he is a character and I think that's kind of a difficultbalance that these performances have to strike and I think they don't all do it,but I think he imagines it all and a Somai with him to have this character,who is kind of a martyr, but it's never it's never didactic. I think that's oneof the thing appreciate a lot with...

...listen is he has this often thepessimistic view of humanity and life on Earth Very? But he lets you do whatyou want with it he's kind of staying out of the way, and that's I think, oneof the things that make this fam work we well. I don't know if you guys thinkof it as a crisis of faith, the O, because when I first watched it, Ithought of it in relation kind of to all those Bergman films, with thesereligious characters who are having a quest of faith but- and there are somesimilarities, but it's also very different. I think, because of the waybe so a Portus it, because it has this kind of exterior view of humanity attimes is looking at human nolit, but yeah in a way that isn't, he manages tonot be judgmental but to make us judgmental in his pace. If that makessense, which I think is quite different from Birdman o back then widishconvenait police gets me. Is that close? Yes, pretty much seriously? Bariga?Okay, so I could e, though, on the reach thissaid, that's that's very good. The one of the things that I like to do when Iwatch prebrow's just tried to see what he's minimizing in a little bit ofRistemmo ISM game and well. The things that found really interesting here isthat we had a lot about this priest being out of tune. We hear a lot abouthim lacking social skills, and we see a little bit of that. We also hear a lotabout the things we want to do that he wants to reform, but we don't actuallyhear what he wants to do. You hear people coming to him talking about howof being ready for his great ideas. We never hear what his great ideas are. Sothis kind of this this base Motim, is actually a removed, that specificity isremoved and it essentially allows us again tying into the cool show that theway for s all my see is essentially allows us to put whatever votive orvision we see on to this character and reflect on it. While we also see hisinternal pain, yeah he's basically a character who has salatia ideas aboutwhat the world is and what it should be and is confronted with the harshreality and really cannot cope with it, and he is kind of a matter, but hemakes himself a matter. I mean he really mistreats himself again, you candecide what you think about it, but in a sense, is very egotistical, but alsovery Atisi that again it's it's really this on leaving you a lot of home forinterpetations. I think- and this also white my point on how it's not quitedepress and were used to, at least for me. There was a more drastic shift withpick pocket, not off about that a little bit or we get to our next film.A man escaped as well, but in both Diraphora priest and a manscapes has agreater degree of sensuality. In a way, it's doesn't have the same missent that wesee in a lot of the later Felis not has called. If you look at the way thefaces are shot and the ambience in the feeling. It also has this: I think thebest varimess this as welty emits we more of the kind of magic that you'dsee in the gazing faces office, Contemporary Cocta, with already worthepreviously, when book to all Venero really get into his own later as well.You just have this kind of sentral visual polatic spirit of it just feeldrawed into these eyes, while from pick pocket onward. It really feels, likethose eyes, are pushing you away. I think I see what you mean with the mainperformance, but the sensuality thing definitely withthe manscapes, not so much with this one. For me, I do think of it as beinga very cold film. I mean I think, of those landscapes, but it's the winter.We or at least four landscapes in the countryside. Yeah. I don't think of itas a warm thing, a doll, but maybe that's why you think it's a masterPison! I don't I like it to be. I don't I don't need a Briton film to bewarmed to lot. I think La Chant, it's my second favorite taut little into oneof pretens, most beloved films, a man escaped or, and this time I'm reallygoing. The Colt by the French pronouncation place in the condom. There are more set,chaper Levante flare, Il van. That was you. I think you could havestopped that I probably should have. I think, what'sreally fascinating. Here is that again, like you said, this is a film that alsohas this central to it, or it was if you said, I feel that I concentrate tothe previous bills past an an added sense of sensuality, and it's also liketer ificant priest and pick pocket heavily narratedd. It's based on ajournal of the person who this really...

...happened to, and it's brought the hiswords that are used. We get the same experience with retailing with the pastand with slow focus, but with that- and this is somewhat unusual for restaurant,even though it's going to tie us in to pick pocket as well. There's a lot ofpension and another claim suspense as our our lead Lieutenant Fronton,carefully plans. His escape lowly works on getting through his store, slowlyplaced all of these little things. He needs to get and put in place and learnfor his escape to be possible, and I mean this is four years before betterdid Latro, which are the almost similar effect miss just this slow, wonderfulsuspense, and I think Preson did it essentially as well, but with a plot,that's even more stripped down and Almos Kep caught up in this magicaltension. An escape is probably my favorite film by by so I really reallyliked it. The first time I saw it, I rewashed it this week and I think Iliked it even more this time. I don't agree with everything you said Chris,especially in the contrast between warm and called that there is between a manescape and big pocket, especially if you look at the main character here,the the man character with no Fontenis well a little bit open to the peoplearound him. He still talk to them. They know what is going to do that he wantsto escape. He still needs to have theseconversations with the other prisoners in pecocity. It seemed that the maincharacter only wants to escape conversation. It doesn't it seem thatit doesn't want to talk to anyone, and do we ask people around him that carefor him, so maybe this feeling of collines people, people get hers, maybealso come from this the position of the main character. I guess we'll talkabout that more later. On a regarding a man, iscariots shock me was the music,the use of music and the sound, because they are almost no music through thefilm. There is only some part from Mosa here and and there, but overall it'sreally relies on the natural sound of the film, which I think adds a lot moreto the tension. You can hear him scratching on wood. You can ear imbreaching glass you can hear in work with iron, and every noise is justaccentuated by this silence which add even more tension, because if he getscooty, pretty much get get shot or get killed. So adding this lack of music,and really this emphasize put on sound, I think, really really adds a lot tothe tension. The lightning was also great. It manages to have greatcontrast, be between the Obscurity and light that is from the outside windowand, lastly, what I noticed was how his work was shot. As we said before, therewere a lot of shots of hands in his prevision, and I think this is a filmwhere releasers short of hands really come through. We, we see him workingwith his tools, trying to create tools with whatever he has to escape, andreally the camera focuses on his hands working crafting. Whatever is doing, Iknow uncle denotes a P as well. It's my favorite from listen, and I think thereason for that is that this is the type of story that that is best suitedfor his style. I know process oriented cinema and this fin is almost nothingbut process on the slow metorchis which the protagonist is going to try to wellescape. It's really the most simple bare bones: props you can imagine itmakes sense that this would work for well with vessels stripped down thesthetic. What makes it special do is that it also reaches something abouthuman nature, about our yearning for freedom. It's quite literal here, asthe thing is about to men in prison, but you could argue that all of bososprotagonists are in some kind of prison prison of the world, the all filltracts and are looking for some way to escape, and maybe that's why this? Thisbeing the most Litura version of it, is the most effective for me as it makesthat subtext we concretes and the son style also makes the wakes in thatstyle. All the more effective claim you mentioned, the use of Mozarts and thatuse of Casco music is so much more effective because of how fares andwithout artifice, as this would say, the thing is outside. Of that S. Igenerally find that's the best way to...

...reach something universal is for the.How specific and this fin is a shining example of that it's so easy to projectourselves on to this patagones and to feel this desire for freedom, whichfeels like it means more than just no escaping this presents something kindof transcendental about humanity as a whole from then is also the easiest.Bisonian potain is life, perhaps because he says forgitten and as aresult, this might be. This was warmest film, which so cis you said you didn'tneed warmth from as Olins I kind of do. I tend to prefer things that have someone somewhere and that's that's probably another reason. It's myfavorites, along with the fact that, on a basic level, it's just a great Fidoand I kind of wish my son had done more things like this. I, like his otherthings as well, but it's just great at it. He just grate at doing suspense,just just as good as some other great fan, maces or and especially in thatclimax, it's breath taking it in a very literal sense. You don't want to make asound yourself because he's so caught up in this quest, and just I'm not sureif you mentioned it, but our LE is not an actual criminal. This is in themiddle of World War Two and he is Nanase prison, not the by the prisoncar, but a at the prison in France, and he is arguably presence last heroiccharacter and again, unlike his later. This is also a man with very cleardirect motives. He has a set motive and a set plan and it puts it into actionand I think that also wide so easy to be drawn in and root for him yeah. It'sthat simplicity, as you mentioned it, what clear goal, not very complicatedperson to get the ind right, it's pretty easy to do good for someone toescape and that really messes well with the simplicity of Vesona, there's amatch in foreign content, which I think maybe is but way it's his best fin moving from the film. That, seemingly,is the point of the best presentin and I would agree in my top three personsfor sure, but he feel, as perhaps most often talked about along with boltheadis pick pocket, which at least to me, as I said earlier, like in some way, itseems like a bit of a completion of his style. This is the point where Bressonstarts to feel like Breton and, and indeed it's sometimes even referred as the firstreal person film, the Dhewo is gone and the bleak the Terminis M is clear. Michelle can helped himself from thestealing he is drawn to it, but even though his eyes are so Opun, eventhough the film can clearly be call Tison in so many ways, I think it doescarry on with it a lot of the suspense that we felt in a man escapes, becausethe the hand play again the work of the hands as they mob steal, as Ta pickpocket is incredible and it just to compliment president of how maginityactually hide real pick pockets for the the pick pocket scenes. It's it'sincredible. It's like a dance and the way that you can quit so much to spendsimply from using close ups of hands, stealing valets and the techniques used.It's something I would say some thing almost transcidental I mean is out ofthis world, just the degree of complexity and simplicity, yeah,totally yeah, I think in forgetting a Manesca or very, very similar films,the music that is very similar in both films, the Philamon as one musicalpiece. Don't remember of the top of my end, who the composer is but yeah, it'salso a musical piece that we will hear three times or maybe four timethroughout the film just like in a Venecher there's. Also this narrationover the film and the main protagonist is also writing a diary. I think it'sinteresting because it's something that will see later on also in his in hisfilms going back to pit poet, I I think it's very shot which quite similar to a man escape. I thinkI still prefer man scape to pick pocket, even though I love both films. Thetension is obviously extremely present here, as well due to the lake of musicin the focus on sound just like in the man escape, and also due to the factthat the police is very present in the film I. So I think it's it's alsointeresting press on de Nether of US an...

...influence. A lot of critics hascompared it to crime and punishment, and, as preson adopted, does the hittwice later in his career at least was a little inspired,unconsciously, because the way that Michelle reacts to the policeman iswith the same kind of what, for you say, larger than life.Megalomanze, though he's a pick up certain, even though he's acting out ofpure impulse, he seems to have this underlying philosophy that she issomehow superhuman that he somehow allowed to get away with things thatother people shouldn't, be it's really of put thing for a character, but it itworth. It also puts us into this kind of intellectual cat and mouth game withthe police inspector, so just to get back to the music. The music is badlywho's on his sous French composer Typica is one. I have a little troublewith. I enjoy the actual pick pockets aspect of it. What you mentioned, thecat in mouse, also the ideology, as you said, that's kind of used to justifyhis impulse. It's actually to get back to hitchcock for a seconds very similarto what the protagonist to hope discuss. It has to do with you find that out inin philosophy in general and play to etc. Where I have trouble with pickpockets. Is that it's not only about that? I mean that's only all you talkedabout are the parts of the things I liked, but there's also a wholeemotional aspect to it, with his relationship with this woman, butthat's hole that takes a lot of the firm and I think it doesn't work at allwith the way some porches it because yeah the way he fins people the way he do exactors, it just doesn't lend itself to very emotional starterng, and one ofthe things that I always see mentioned in we views of this wing that arepositive is something about the ending which is supposedly this very powerfulscene, and to me it's doesn't really do much. I don't know I like to pickpocket, but they barely just because of those people at things which, as wesate great, I think there is his attempting to make his style work for a story thathas been well suited to it. As far as an contend, I guess we're spoiling tothe film because yeah I would have to discuss a bit the ending spoil warding so yeah. What happens? Is You know heis to England for two years and then come back and this woman as a kid fromhis older friend who left her yeah? I would agree that the romance, let's saypart, is not the most interesting. Your aspect of the film the People Get shemsare obviously the main focus on of the film. I think it's still an interestingrelationship and I think it deserves to have a place in the film because itjust shows how emotionally detached his from everyone, and, even though thereis this sort of woman around him and is no friend and usually in films. Youhave this. When you have this triangle, let's say between a woman and two men,the two men will be fighting for here. I just you know, is not interested inthat kind of thing at all. All you want to is big pocket. You know it seemsthat he's not only doing it, as I mean to survive, but also because after awhile, it seems to to enjoy it to enjoy the complexity and to get a tick fromsimply from from doing that, and regarding the ending. It's not very sorowfully ending. I would agreewith you. I still think it's a pretty good ending.I guess he, even though we knew that the guy is betting with, is a policemanor at least that something is strange because he has a lot of money and it'snot the forces that you don't the fact that he still can't refrain himself asay from dealing in his pockets. Really, I guess, shows a lot about hischaracter, even though he said that you would take care of the kid and thewoman, it seems that he can't help himself yeah. I agree, but I guess theway you describe the relationship. You say he is not very emotion you attached right, butthe issue is that, because that's the way this otanes people, no one isemotionally attached to anything, seems right. You don't get the feeling thatshe is that emotionally attached to anything either, because she is givingkind of the same type of performance really and don't you? No! You disagree. No, no! It's not the hidare. I just. Iguess that even Joe, even though she doesn't show it, I guess she's still abit attached to him. I guess she wouldn't come come back to him thatoften, if she wasn't, if F, she really...

...didn't care yeah. I guess that's why itdoesn't work well for me in that I don't really get a sense of why she actually washed us and and sane forfor the other meater. Well, I guess it's time I rely. The cooler show, iffact to I v Feeling I got from Martin Fus to she will in love with him, tolie to a large extent. Why? Yes, yes, it's true! This is one of thethings that really bothered me and the first time. I worked the second timeand I think it s. It really is what I talked about earlier with. What to meis also what present crisis to do with just to wave folks on the characters toMisoneism is the man it's kind of almost outputting is there, which isjust that it's so brutal. It's such a brutal expression. I think that, withthe characters of Jan and Jack, who are the woman and the friend, they arealmost like this moral influence on him as well. They do try to save him in away, even though they're not necessarily even know what is goingthrough. They tried to talk to but try to get him on the right path, but isalways picturing them off. I think that there's a contrast between the moreopen modeling done of Vertot. We can call the love interest,but the more open way he works with the Carter of Jan and the very offutt wayhe works with the lead in Michelle that that makes that contrast possible. Thatmakes first seem more human, because all we see from Michel is just pushingpeople away from him. Then I just has this complete lack of care for anythingin the world. I think, in contrast, everything else almost seems warm. Okay.I can see that you mentioned by the way the Miss Entune, and that's also why tome- I don't forgive. I ate this time a lot to Manscapes, I think of it more asbeing a kind of a draft for Laja. It's alsobecause I like, and I think you mentioned, that you had seen the filmsup to Mouchete and then Larsan, and I think that this kind of load, some thatis also something we see in a lot of his smaller films from the S as well.We I tinges on and later present that's kind of what I think, like the films hemade have the pick pocket, which all most of them have built that misantropethat you see in pick pocket and Lahat Yeah. I've only seen after a big pocketof Misionarios, but but to move on the trial of Dan ofart, which, honestly to me, is its most extreme film, and it's also want toreally drives with the want to narrate the kind of story of Reson where he youknow. He starts with the anxious of sin and, ladies of the park, and justslowly cuts away more and more and more story until he's just showing theabsolute essentials I mean, unlike men, Eis, later films, we will be focusingon you know, doors, opening and people sitting and various other situationshere. Anything that you be considered fluff is just Tut. It is adopteddirectly from the court transcripts of the real trial and breath essentiallycut so much that it couldn't even make an eighty minute film. The film was allis sixty five minutes. You essentially only get the testimonies off down ofArk in a few statements and questions from the inquisitors and peoplevisiting her. That's it it's heard in court and in hersel. That's all we seethe scenes cut almost immediately as a line we spoken. Sometimes just that'ssentence finishes. It is so brutal in expression when I say it's its mostextreme film prasis, more secret experiment. I don't think I'mexaggerating at all and it's just such a different, visual and cinematicexperience and that almost anything else that exists. The question, ofcourse you we left. This is, does it work good question and it's also of himI relatch this week. I think I liked it a bit less this time around. As yousaid, yeah, it's very much his most extreme film in the sense that it isthe most minimalistic approach to the film that he did. We only have thisdialogues and that's that's about it even to they are a bit of movements here and there you, you seeher walking from her jail to the court room and then we see them going intoher jail cell, so there are still a bit of action going on, but it's only for afew seconds and the rest is pretty much just talk and talk ing that that'sthat's about it, even though there is a littesupplet between UN of ORC and oneof the priest who's trying, I guess to...

Elper by making some small signs to her.I hope you ison talking about the young one. Yes, yes, Tomare, okay, okay,great yeah, it's just a little splot thing that has no that doesn't reallyadd anything to the story but yeah. I guess it's something. Yeah else to belooking after in the film I guess I was a little bit less interested this timearound hearing the dialogs, because the dialogus are obviously the mostimportant part regarded to use of music. It doesn't really have any music eitherthis time the only music that is used is a military drums. So it's not well,I don't. I don't know if it's a famous rhythm, but I don't think I did beforeso we went from this classical pieces to just strip down. Bear Minimum War drown typeof music, which I tout add to this minimalistic extreme approach of thefilm. So overall, it's it's a good film, but probably not one that I wouldconsider is the best after a re watch yeah I mean I think this is one of hisweaker films for sure, but it actually grew for me and we we, we watched it acouple of months ago before they even planned this. This episode- and I wasjust really interested in that extremity and in that depiction andfrom stabbord of a minimalistic exercise, it incredibly impressive, butI also think it does have a decent amount of power, and I think it also. Isuppose I was wrong a little bit earlier when I said that lady in a manescapes is the last hero, work, resting character, I'll, obviously don a fork.This place a great degree of terrorism and persistence in this film as welland as present rose about question. I I really read something that wasadditional into this. This petral, because he is, you, do have a turn ofthe sensuality in a little way, but at the same time the motions are sostripped down as well, there's just almost no essence of what we callconsider performance. It's let's pre that this is an experience, is anextremely cut down, really blunt experience that that still at least tome carried a lot of power with it just because of that yeah. I definitelyagree with that. I think it's a powerful film and from obviously a verypowerful character. I think it's also interesting to see that most of thefilm about Danof, ORC or film that well at least the most famous ones, areone that focuses on the trial, because what is obviously this one and theother very famous film about you, an of arch, is the one from Hie from thetwenties, and I think it's interesting to see that both both of them focus onthe Tri and not what she actually did to the battle she took part of and yourlife, but to just what at one trial and or sentence to to Def, just to jump inone of the reasons. I think that both of these films are so focused on thetrial is also because it's we have a choice of it. I mean we have thetranscript basically from the trial, and so that's the thing we know aboutfor show about Jonava. So that's also why it's so important and oftenrepresented yeah. I forgot about about that, but at the very beginning of thefilm it says that the dialogues are taken directly from Weemans cripts thatwe have. I think there are cop, perhaps a couple of lines from the priestess tohelper that are not in the court primises every line of statale if awrit down line of dialogue has repeated verbatim. So it's definitely uniqueexercise in that regard. Anything out of the coach would be fictional, whichone or a youthing out of the trial. You know, I don't know if they are sins inthe prison wiht. That's what you said. I just say I think I think those areactually recorded as well, because essentially it's the price coming downand there's even then on Tinter, saying wot. They should write down, so I thinkthey're still writing down ever. Can she says to them? So it's it's justessentially all just taking rabot everybody an thet's shut down, butobviously, when you do something this extreme and I think lone, so you love,which will discuss a little bit later. It's not the example of goingextremingly different direction. This was in many ways a cinematic taen likehe couldn't even do more than sixty five minutes. Like it's a bit of it's abit of a complete trap. I mean I could have, you know, started making shortfilms again and they could have. Maybe I don't know what he could have adoptedto try to make features like maybe the entire Bible, which was actually is.You did want to make the book of Tenness as his final project, and Iwasn't able to, but it's just impossible to really continue down thistrial much further, which is...

...perhaps why others are both us are orwhich is it called in English? My friend Baltas are a lovely love. Theadventure film about the young girl and their best friend the donkey goinggreat adventures together. It's so different for anyone. Worse, not see the film.This is o. That was a farce. If this is one of the bleakest films Preson everyday, that's an other example of extreme misanthropy and pitality. Even animalcruelty were essentially frames, all of humanity, as opposed to this almostsaintly donkey and the Botas are- and this is also the film a verbiantbeginning where time essentially is minimized, as you just travel throughdecades of Pathos, ours, life and they can fade in together and you don't knowexactly where you are, and you kind of get just left into various owners, andit's just the story of this donkey being retreated over and over again andthere's a lot of beauty that I think honestly flying back to the cool showereffect that don't he give it an incredible performance but yeah. Ithink it's basically the best example ever of the coition of effects that ain that tin thing. You said the earlier to that, a okay. It's really the bothperfect resoling actor ines had to include that quote of your metier,because that I yeah but, like you said you if he was aSemetic de end and he had to get out of it. But in a way he goes even downdeeper. The rabbit hold by getting rid of you know human protagonists, yestat's true, and it is a verse to because you refuse to cash an untraineddonkey Si if you to cast a train don you because he taught the all the wityou tell is icing scare to, as I shall have no professional, not eventhe donkey. Is it only one d? THAT'S SO IMSEIF!That's the case, I believe so. Yes yeah. I just took it back to as for second tothe coition effects, I think maybe the one scene that I would use toillustrate the coition effects, just in all of cinema would be the sin whereBaltazar is going into the circus and by some kid he cuts from the variousanimals in the circus and back to Bates, and you really feel like he is amusedor angry or fray that it really strongly feels that we, it is to mewhich of course, is completely. You know nonsense and I think it's very,very impressive scene in that respect, but I did say he was going away fromhuman protagonists, but that's not quite true because of course in Wasabiyou have an Jizi. Who is the VIO potion this? They would say- and you mentionedthe earlier- that he didn't like his actors doing other things whereobviously anduze ski did do other things later, and I think it's atestament to how good she is as an actress that she manages kind of wake.Through his tie right, she manages to still communicate emotion, while stilla Deing, essentially to what listen is doing, and I think that's what makes it a great thing. I Love was about thisarm and it's not the thing that is obvious for me to love, because Icoleopterite on an escape. That's a water, it's very process focused it'sthe kind of thing I love O, usually, but this this isn't and I think it'sreally Vezem Ski. That brings me in, and that gives me that way to toappreciate it. Despite the intense weakness as you as you describe it, Imean the the boyfriend character in as Amata might be the most evil personever patrium screen. I is I Leo am I think I agree. I really agree. I meanall of the men Misantrope of presents like a film. I, I can't think of onecharacter that that makes me loathe him more than more than this one, and Ialso completely agree regarding me as Simkin. I mean her performance thereand I I guess it's really hard to talk about performances in presents films,so I think it's paper to talk about presents, but her presence and it kindof emotional, resonance and strength youjust get from seeing her, essentially petray someone so weak, so surrenderingand just consistently more and more beaten down as well. It's incredible, Ithink she really stands out as this, but is almost symbol of this. I andeverything back at it is that performance. I did rewash that over thelast week as well and honestly, it went down a little bit in my estimation,largely just because the first time I couldn't help to sympathize so muchwith her character Marie well. This time it was more clear that she wasgoing so less as a victim, I suppose at or more as accepting whati was Tafetanto her and going into what was...

...happening to her, which I guess madeemotional restaurants, a little weaker and Prad by most resonans to watch thedonkey itself, hunger. But but yes, I mean she does such anincredible job in this movie. This sand, the reverse. Actually, we talked aboutit with Muchet, but I think because she is the architect of her own demise. Ithink that makes her better character when I find it easier to empathize withactually because saintly characters that get tortured by circumstances. Idon't know we see that Trotin film and I often have a little trouble with itand I think obviously she has a goodyere time, but the fact that shehas this attraction for this guy. She is really driven by her own desires andI think that's much more interesting than someone who is more passive andjust a victim, but one thing: That's unique about this thin at this in theones I've seen his is Baltasar and to have this audience surget. Why? Becausethe other pesonne they're always very active the damage driving the props,but if you see but dazes, the protagonist here he's judged theaudience Shurgat, and I think that adds that helps the film not feelperspective. Prescriptive right, because that's, why is interested inmorality is interested in basically how bad humanity is, how sinful it is, butit doesn't feel like he's working. You figure out you in part. I think,because he used this device of that Desar. I think what you say about thetemes character also really ties in way to determinism. That is really in fullflow in presence work now, in the sense that against pere best well being inevery way she keeps making these really bad decisions for herself yeah. Youcould see th determinism and I'm sure from what you? U Seem to say personwould see that way, but you could also see it as just being, on the contrary, right making the badchoices. That's maybe the best example of we women that you don't thinkrationally and you don't do the just thing you do give us anyway. I again, Ithink what makes this from great and part for me is hope, open. It is tointerpretation. I think you completely right hisses, something we talked aboutit. It's all her things as well. We can read so much into them simply becauseso much is stripped away and to continue the exercise in strippingthings away. I think we also didn't mention that this is the first filmresent dead, without either heavy monologue or narration. It's a film wit with an animal protagonist that doesn'tspeak, and I'm not sure if you can say he really takes it further in thecompanion piece, which is reset. He made these two films, essentially as todo back to back one thousand nine hundred n sixty six one thousand ninehundred and sixty seven, but it's certainly going in the same direction.I mean I mean someone who often liked to think of directors journeys as moreof a story. This almost seems like a made it the wrong way, because inMichette he has a human protagonist, a child who doesn't speak at least notmuch. It's very, not communicative and stripped down, and it seems like thenext step from that in terms of how little do we know of our protagonistwould have been the donkey, but oh well, let's just accept that and say thatMichette and I think we can disagree about this, because you said it was sodifferent from pick pocket, but I still see that all most loads on this inmachettes eyes, and that was the thing that really pushed me away from boththe film and pick pocket the first time I saw them seeing it again now. I thinkit's a wonderful, wonderful film, but it is so bleak. It is so brutal. It'sso crude in just the way presences lit character at emotions round it, how shereacted, it's really a powerful, powerful blow and and certainly showsjust the kind of again power and brutality. The present could evoke withhis minimalism. Well I guess I see what you said about PIP Pokat. You saidthat his protagonists were kind of lothsome from that in time, and I don'tthink that's the case with you sit at all is that's not how I read it I kindof wish. I were that way, because I think I would like to thing better if Ithought her character was more complicated because to me she's just avictim. Unfortunately, that's that's really nice and maybe that's why he don't like thehim as much as you do. I like it but yeah to me it's kind of an exercise inTochan, no ether, not miss my pore. He me think of the Dan Actually, whichafferma that I sometimes have trouble with, but I think Jo Setan is kind of like a better,better take on that story to mebecause...

Sally, because Leta is complex character, which I don't catchwith me, sir, but it sounds like like you do ye sure, as it was sorry butsure that I was largely inference by by inshot yeah. I would be shocked if itwasn't, and I mean there. Dens are one of the few directors who could in someway be tried to press on boreck as well, and I think I said a is one- the filmsthat everybody recalling Petonia, so that tie is just firmly firmlyestablished, but I mean I'm not sure if I see her as more of a active proteges. I certainly agree thatthings happen to her, but I think when I say Lord, so we don't necessarilymean that she is loads. I think it's more a case of her loathing the worldaround her because he lives in this extreme mystery she's distrectes by herfather. Her mother is dying. She doesn't get love anywhere. As you see,she definitely communicate with the world around her either ecitesbelonging or looking for some kind of love or acceptance. He can't even actproperly in class she's, pushing everyone away from her just as to leadin pick pocket when she's forced to sing. You know she's just start crying.She can't really communicate that. I know present hated symbolism, but atasering you hated Meta for- and you have these scenes where or thismethaphor, so casting an what characters want to believe to theaction, and you have these scenes outside where you know, as soon as theyget out of school, this happens twice. She runs away from th rest of the classand she attacks them with dirt and the thing she trosso do, that are thingslike handbags and perfume and perhaps all of the teams that she doesn't getthat doesn't enjoy the the fine things in life. If you will- and it's justthis utterly and completely pained and a tortured character, which is why Ithink you're calling you torture port, it's actually quite quite fitting. So Iguess I would agree with both of you on shit. I think I liked it weigh morethis time that I re watched it and the first time the major to buchet is obstRasonin. She is truly open to the to the world and there is of those thingsgoing around her. She isn't living in a very happy environment as as we said,and I guess what really makes her interesting in that, even though she'srejecting everything that is around her she's still a child, and I think it's afirst and only time my son really had a child is main protagonist and just justlike the donkey is powerless Tho. She is as well. She she can rely. You knowshe's young, she can't really defend herself. She is almost belonging in theworld, even though she has people around her Seton care for and well theonly character that we, I guess care a bit for her. A well being will be a manshall met later run in the film in the second half of the film, where she willspend the night with with him in his cabin. I guess on a rainy night and shewill care for him all the throughout through the night, even when he hassome kind of pietic seizure. I think, as he is for him singing for him andjust caring about him the way she hears for her mother. I guess that's the onlytime where Bresson character well care as much for another person, walliantearly, wer yea, but- and I think this- this relationship it with her and ourson is also really troubling. No, it's obviously an adult. It's obviously hasvery big psychological problems and there's also this- I don't think you'reable to spoil what happens to them, but there's also this sexual element there, which can bedeeply disturbing, also how she reacts to that, and I'm not sure I want to spoil reshet that the ending, I thinkis very troubling for me, but it's just this cold and calculated almost by thenumbers way that she moves her toward a specific reaction of decision and it's,I think it's Oben more this time than last time, but there's the bleak hesn'tcoldness of this film I mean perhaps large and is colder a bleakerand darker, but machettes. I certainly second in line, I would say yeahwithout saying where it is. When we get to the end that fuse inevitable. Iguess back to the TERMINIS A as mention even though it's hard to talk about itwithout spoiling it. I guess she had faith Lettin, a said that I things willbe different with him because of what...

...he did now they would. Maybe maybe sheimagined that they would know you take her away, and I just the ending showsthat things are not the way she imagined them at first, and maybe thatwould explain what happened in the last scenes of the movie. I know it's quitevague it s like that, but it's a it's a reality it without withoutrevealing our flora. Emeut yeah. I agree a A. I really just think that itjust showcase how pain and torture is by the world rounder. That is justreally to cling to any kind of closeness, no matter what it is nowmoving on to our next film here it has, I suppose, some of the similar domaticto return, but a little bit in reverse now a gentlewoman or in Sandu isBresson first color film, and it also start and aces go on to become quitebig Dominicana. So it's a two active Sytin, very close, closetime lines that you know you could also say, broke, presents heart and gettingquite large careers afterwards and some a had a much larger career than we hadsome skate. But in terms of I think this is an interesting film to say,because it's often considered one of the lesser besons and it returns thekind of verbosity often of his earlier films, where it opens up with some thecharacters, suicide, and then we get essentially the history of it throughthe wet telling of a husband as it tries to come to terms with what hashappened. We have narration and you have flashbacks in be a very similarway in its older films. But I suppose an interesting thing again here is that,while in this earlier film it was characters telling their own story andthen not and then characters not being able to speak in a gentle woman. It'ssomeone narrating the story of someone else. So you get this a situation where she's trying to understand doing son has character and we try tounderstand there, but the person telling the story- it's not her. Soit's distance really one step further, but would you say some that, like emski brings something new something different to to the Peperoni? Yes,actually, I think she's also one of tolls actors as rectors who manage tobreak Tou breathin style that she does what he wants. But he still has thisdegree of Charitha and all of that really works for the characters, the Ato feel a percipitate to her to just feel so much stronger than it perhapsotherwise would it doesn't feel that or dead in the way that person was perhapshave shops some of his other characters? She is noticeable in every scene. Let'sis put it like that. The fact that the FAM is in Corder, I think, is veryinteresting. It's his first film is in color, as you said, and it'ssuch a huge contrast in vessons career between the black and white and thecorner because, as we said, his films are usually extremely bleak and verystraight down to the bear essential and the black and white amatory just addedto this feeling of almost coldness and minimalistic approach. Here he decidedto film in conners and from what I remember is films are pretty Confu. Actually, she decided toW L, not extremely cold powerful, but he decided to use coders to is to hisadvantage in his in his film, which I guess is a very deliberate choice,because obviously we could e could have started making color films pretty muchsince is beginning as a Tentyra in forty three,even even though it was intressant there common to make sure in color back,then I guess it could have still do it. Andy could definitely have done it inthe later on in the in the s. So I guess it's bicause deliberate choicefor him to stay in black and white because atmosphere. I guess you wantedto create easier to do in Lickin white and now that he's going to connor. Iguess he wants maybe to express something different. He actuallyresisted calling into color for a very long time. It was not comfort with themove to color, and I think it's obviously there's The Times pushing himto take that step. While he still accepted and went into it full see myhead, it's it was not perhaps what he would have preferred to do. Ife Getstuck with his original vision. Okay, I...

...didn't. I didn't know that. That's okay,that's that's interesting! So I guess you would. I could have madethis entire films in black and white, so that would have been. That wouldhave been interesting thing. I guess some of his films are better in colorthan than black and white, but yeah honestly, looking at this philographythe rest of this phonography a have been in black and white, and it wouldhave made that much of a difference. I guess so it is true, but the color doeswork as as well, and I think one of the things that really strikes me with Idon't lumine- is it's gentleness in a way it is really so slow moving andagain it returning to a few of fiola films it. It doesn't feel as harsh. Itfeels more sympathetic. It feels more sensual, a that's, probably largely dueto Sunda's performance and showing us the kind of internal pain. Thischaracter is going through and just being so separated from both herhusband from love from, but everything this character might be looking. For Imean that's the thing we don't really know. We just know that something isseverely wrong. We don't really know her story. We only observe it to herhusband's words, but there is just this quiet melancholy pain if that justpresent that at all points in some of hes performance and it's absolutelybeautiful, and what we're doing, because I know we haven't seen thisfrom yet mater, but he made a fantastic got. The donkey was the perfect. A resonate didsay that if someone hadn't stopped him, he probably cast a table top next and essentially an essentially in this film. He castdoors, not doors is something. Bresson has worked with a lot O low, showinghands to low, showing hands opening doors. He also perhaps inspired by hisstay in the prison camp, love showing a bit of a captivity in a shootingthrough bars or fences, and to see that a lot in this film as well, but I thinkI have never been more aware of present store. It starts with a door opening itends with a door opening in some scenes. We see characters going to two to threedifferent doors. Several scenes are shot through glass doors, it's justdoors, really work through all of it and, while again present hatedsymbolism. I think it must have been a conscious decision in terms of just theemotions of boxing in the character- and I say the last scene enter the door:it's not a door, it is portas being closed, but it's a very similar effectand this idea of isle character being so boxing closedup, and always these stores being closed and open. It has a reallyinteresting effect in this on and not to mention that when I'm so man aobject that a in the U K, O Manesca, is obviously the door that he has to crackthrough in order to escape so yeah doors are probably something veryimportant in is films yeah. It might not be on purpose. You never know. I dothink it gets back to the idea of this cast Elia about all of his maincharacters being prisoners of the world. In a sense you know literally prisoners,but even in the Obana there kind of imprisoned yeah. It's yeah, I guessit's true. I guess it also is accentuated by the fact that thecharacters who usually are not like moving a lot making like those moving around their arms or anything italmost. It always looks like that. Her arms are straight and close to theirbody, which I guess almost looks like they're in a well not in a box, butthat there movement or restrain that's a really great point as well, and Ithink just to tire of this persition with the Noterai that I do not makemyself but which is sad about film. A lot is that tying this to resenceideology of wanting cinema to peak something completely different fromevery other art forms. Of course, as you know, he the tested the verse inthe Mind Self itself, and you know it's all that that's filmed place,preferring to the motor aphy in this film. He actually ties in theater hisshow theater on Ben. He shows people reading. He shows people listening tomusic, it shows people going to museums and looking at various forms of art. Soit's it. It has been called a bit of a showcase of how he siems different from these other art forms, so that that'snot something I myself picked up on at the time. I think it's worth bringinginto the equation. It is definitely...

...some something I thought about with theguards to the acting style and also the fact that a lot of his films isespecially thought about this, with Gandaki companions to dive ofintrovision a man scape, they feel like silent films at time. That's I think,because that that is kind of the purest form of cinema and the way he directshis actors is very much something you can only get away with in film. So Ithink that the tweeny reinforces your point that he is really definitelyagree that he achieves that. He achieves something that is uniquelycinematic. Who is this very peculiar way of directing actors? Yeah? I guessit. Would you be silent film, but with natural sounds yeah yeah, obviously itno seconds, but they can of look like that. I don't know. I feel like thatyeah! No, I toyatte look like they look very much like silent film, but thereis all this. The importance of the sounds around him. So yeah, that's A,which is why I say you know silent film, but using natural sounds. Maybe youknow films where characters couldn't couldn't speak or the Ale wouldn't bepicked. Neither the mice around, but on the natural sons, and this focus anatural sounds, does tire us into the next film four nights of a dreamerwhich is still completely stripped down, but also turning us to a lot of thethings we know from present. You have character narration, you have characters closed off, separated fromthe world. It's also in color, and here the colors are absolutely incredible. Imean, I think some of the shots here are almost dream like, and I suppose this is whythat, despite is still did so minimalistic so cut down in terms ofthe scope of human emotions. It feels like a warmer film and I'm going totalk a little bit about the music later, but there's even musical intervalscoming into the film with its almost three of magic as he spins a love story,and it might be, but I think lotor but because is likely to fuck, but a storyof love rather am of the very few present did especially in this waywhere the law of a longing it can be felt. So so in some ways it's anarchetypical breath on film then so ways it's so different yeah. It'sextremely different from the rest of the film that he made until that point.If we is creed that the family just talked about a gentlewoman yeah Qui fisty well talk about themusic but yeah. I think that was one of the thing I picked up when we watchedit was to use of music. It's very modern, because before that we only hada classical pieces here, we have are not an expert, but I think it's Posno,I think, which is to me team like something more modern type of type ofmusic. The setup is obviously great: The JUSEMtakes place in Paris by night. It's interesting to to notice that I thinkthe film is very luminous in a way that there is a lot of light, even thoughit's taking taking place during the night, we have the lights coming fromthe POTERLO. You know I outside the street, but also lights coming fromshops and coming from boats sailing or an sen. I think you completely rightthere, and this is what I talk about- also about the beauty of this film,because while a gentle woman was his first color film, this is the firstfilm I feel he really used color and composed with color and composed withlight. It feels very different now t is such a stript bare story, and it isabout a young, isolated, the painter meeting, a young woman contemplatingsuicide talking her except a down of the ledge and then forming a kind ofrelationship based on that, this woman is hopeless in love with a man who lefther idea earlier and she was hoping to meet on the romantic bridge, but not anhe didn't show up and over the next few days, arete nights, these thecharacters meet up and they talk about their lives and they get to know eachother, and what's really interesting here is that these talks are justintercut, naturally, within the film, by music, by performances by all thelives of cause am around this this bridge. So you will have performersjust walking past singing. You are the characters coming across people inlocation singing, and you will have this one, especially almost magicalscene, with the boat going over. The bridge and re fall. The bolt and wehear the band performing on it and its...

...colors are actually warm, and I thinkthis is why, at least for me, even though that performances are so strictdown, the the ISMATIC is love here. There isthis additional poetry that you just wouldn't have gotno other vice and I think, without getting to pretentious it'slike it's almost as if Brasol is playing with the cooler show effect,but with town, but it music and having been the characters, respond to themusic. We see and feel as well. So it's just done so beautifully yeah, it's alittle. We duty for self. I don't know how the fact that the main character isa painter was how much it was influenced by my sons on past as apainter. But I guess there is probly a maybe or connection here that both ofthem are artists trying to live from painting at at first when they areyoung adults, something. I also noticed when we were talking about thediaries before, like you know the one in a pig poet,the country priest here, the the main character also have a diary, but thistime it's it's not a written wine. It's a spoken one. He has this ignito phone. I think that's how it'scalled and is now recording, well not as much as his life, but I guess lifethe way I want it to be, because you know you meet is woman and hisobviously in low with her, and I guess he is what his recording is not reallyreality but reality as he would like it to be, and even though he incorporatesreal sounds of birds and whatever he picks out when he's outside the story'stelling is obviously not not during the real one. I think it's all for Ahi at aJactare. It goes on, and thus I think it's a famous book for his descind. Ithink it's worth noting that this was. Is The white nights in a gentle womanbeing raised on general creature and just the way that, with these retomberpromises, and in did this so bare this performances that, towards the very endand again I don't hunt to spoil but feeling it really starts to build upthis bit. IFUL long burn or slow bear film where it takes a little while toreally get into the seetal conflict of one to really works. I would actuallysay in this case I'm not sure if it's, despite or of that, the power of thathope of this love. I, when I rewashed it a couple days ago, even though Iknow the ending that it's still extremely extremely tertain, hasn'tseen it or anyone has read the book, but is he such a heavy punch? Let's sayso? Let's just move to restaurants next film, which, if wewere to say that for night of a dreamer, is in some ways presents warmest. What comes next could hardly be colderand not just cold, almost inhuman launcelot. To luck if presents take onthe actorine legend, but where others would capture adventure or magic.Bresson has taken his minimalism to such an extreme that what we are leftwith it certainly doesn't feel like night in shining armor. In fact, itlooks and feels more like pin boxes hanging swords into each other. We talked earlier of how, if it calledthe trial of John of ARC, presents most extreme film in terms of minimalism.Well, Lancelot to luck is a pretty good contender, but here resent takes hisminimis in a very different direction: cutting down performance stripping, allin motion and Glamor aside, leaving us with statues or models that are simplymoulder and moved the way he wants them to there's simply no sign of life. Here,I'm not give sure how to describe the visual, the that they're. Just I meanthe rester shoots flatly quite often, but there's just he's just taking allof the beauty and magic away from the story, and you left with these TimBoxes, Yo'r clicking into each other left with this moloto dialogue. Youjust left with this impassioned play or heroism, and an intrigue and betrayalas well, and it's just so cold so simplified that yeah. It took a lot of getting used tofor me to love this film before I talk...

...a little bit about it. Chris, I justsort of a film major who made a similar film, let's say nowadays it's Angria. Iwas wondering if you've seen some of his films and if you thought that hisfilms are similar as well. No, I don't believe I have actually that's I'lldefinitely put his works on my watch list. Okay. Well, I thought they werequite similar because they have this also very straight down almost nonacting in a way and one of his most famous film, which I can't remember thetitle and a look for it. A bit later on is also taking taking place in theMiddle Ages. At the same time of not Stru, I know so dislike his films fromwhat I remember so yeah, but I think they're, quite original yeah I'lldefinitely think at this. We any. I can see what you mean with a complete rifton a people not responded to its like. I do not respond to also to luck at allthe first time I saw it. It was my least favorite press on for a longestamount of time, but once I started to see more Bresson, it was also the firstfilm that I really wanted to re explore to see. If it would work me now- and itreally did- I responded so much to this. The brutality of the simplicity of itis the experiment in itself not often swept away by style and by expression,which I suppose is what worked there, but just the wayeverything straight down to the six trend. I mean the the extremity of itand the impassionate s of it. It real becomes powerful in the way for me thatI really struggled to say why I think it's just to share witality ofsomething so strapped down to to change a subject. A little bit. I wanted totalk about the colors. I remember the colors being very, very bright made bynot is right term, but I remember the m being quite colorful and probably themost colorful film by some I ever did. Would you would youagree with that? Chris? I think I would probably say that, for as a dreamer ismore colorful, but yes, I can on extent. So you see what you mean it's I meanit's also set a lot in the forest. It's has some that crat decoration, you havelarge lousing since the spectators and all in the proper garbs etc. But I meanI just can't really think of it at as colorful. I see it, that's so muted in in every way. So it's horror for me tosee that by, but I think you're protectorate. Okay, so I haven't seenthose ones, but I was actually surprised by how relatively colorfulLAN was. When I watched it, it's not. I mean it's not super brides, but it'snot as drab as you might expect from this aswar war view and moving over tofill them is perhaps Dosen use colors that marter that well, it's his anultimate film, the devil, probably which was inspired by a newspaper, cutthing of a suicide that ended up being a murder. It's probably my leastfavorite person is. I still think it's a really strong work, but it isprobably the one film where I taught his style just did not quite work, and the reasonfor that is that he's trying to represent the character who's't simply want to experience asmuch life and pleasure as they can and then get moved to a position a most toexperience, something else something darker and there are some absolutelygreat scenes in the film. I think the ending is really powerplay ironic andstrong final line, but while it still works, while it's still powerful, I dothink it's one of his less effective bus, one that did two books by Dostoiand for some reason I believe that the main Jeri reminded me a lot of just kicharacter in the way that he well, you know, discuss religion,politics and try to find. I guess his pace in the in the world and justeventually reject everything. I thought he was a very dusties king characterregarding youth. I haven't seen that one but- and I don't think it's kind ofsurprising how Christen who is a very religious, formae and very internal. Heis actually quite connected with his times I mean in Asaba. Are you alsohave that right? You have the the boyfriend character. He is listening tothe music of the Times, he's his engaging with the world around him,which also- and in sounds like what you describe- is very much a nine with that.I think you're completely right this sexola the things that really impressesme both about that. That will probably end about four nights of a dreamer yeah.It's just how to pocrat of young people really seem to match up with theportrait of, if not the French away of the Post French Le Wave type ofdynamics that you now see in I in no be...

...the films of eustace or be at the filmsof Garral, like all of this directors c coming up with ut culture in the S andreally contemplating on this in the Seis like Briston seems to be makingfilms with similar focus as a new, similar representation. It might be theminimalism again that and just wonders of extent the true o f a that makesthis possible, but it really seems to capture the same kind of feeling. Ithink we need to focus on just why that's impressive, because Preson wasborn in the very early nineteen hundreds I mean for all of the filmshave been disgusting for the last half hour hour or so like in the S he was in.His is already for this film. He was already for the probably was already inhis mid S and tying us over to his swan songlachant, which feels so powerful. It's arguably his best inmen like many equitis. We call it his best film to me it's his second best,but it's just such a powerful thing has so many great to this there's so muchpower were essentially money and the handlingof money again with his hands, touching only taking money trading money takingthe place of violence like taking the main focus here, which is just Puatin,almost beauty or or or simp place in thematic clarity and focus, and he waseighty two at this point and if you listen to people like say, QuintonCantino we did the podcast on hasty air. The like no people couldn't carefullymake good movies. After sixty like A, we have a director making off his mostpowerful and best regarded worlds in his S, and it feels so outfurled feelsso strong is just incredible that that you had that passion in him it to thevery end. Essentially, even though he died at ninety eight in one thousandnine hundred and ninety nine, so yeah, I agree it's impressive, I mean I don'tthink I should come into it too much. I don't really agree with towns, you know,but one of the things that came to mind watching Tajo. It definitely feels like summary film of his career right. Itkind of combines a lot of elements that are in his previous films, and does itvery well, I think it's a very successful tin. One thing I thoughtabout watching it is where what do I think this song is politically, heseems like a conservative and there's a shot in the jaw that made me thinkabout that in the way he lingers on the sign of the hotel that protagonistcheck sin after going or coming out of prison, and the sign is looked atModane at modern what a and he really he really lingers on that and andthere's also movement in a trial where one of the characters is defendinghimself by saying oh he's explaining why he did what why what he did bysaying. Well, The Times are changing and the new idea is going around. Ithought it would be fine, and so that feeds very conservative, but I alsothink that Tis is not really at least is not reactionary, because there's noideal of time in the past. For me, so right, even I haven't seen the film setin mediate, but even like when he portrays country life back in a abates,and I we have a contrite. Those are not ideator not at all, and I think thatmakes him very interesting as a maker, because he's had to ben down and toalso comment on something else that you guys talked about is modern for makers.That kind of feel like Bresson, we mentioned the DA then Clem mentioned inkin and two that came to mind watching this Hannek and Asmani in differentways. I think the big difference is that person is not provoking anythinghe's just showing you something that coldly and he's not smoke at all, whichI think is also a big difference. But I feel, like those two fine makers arevery much influenced by Oleson, especially Tim, like like a and beentalking about this topic of where it might be. In the political spectrum,I'm not sure if anyone's really written about this here it was very quiet. Ithink you for US love. There was about hisTenma ideology and view point e. wasn't that loud about his politicalviewpoints, even though he covers a lot of more radical politics in this laterfilms, and you think, though, it's interesting that in Lagan, essentiallymommy is the root of evil or human. Dealing with money is the root of theso much pain destruction. I mean there are murders in this film there'sviolence in this film, but that's never really tone. What is son is money,straining hands and it's just important of money and and and the cruel diet comes from it. It'sreally really impressive and O to just jump back to the very beginning of thefilm as all to something else that you...

...don't really see that often in thiswork, but I guess Tis introduced how much it is tripped away just how fastthose early scenes move. You have so many characters. If you want to saythat you know the del probably is a kind of metaphor of youth in France.This is essentially a metaphor of could be rather some as a metaphor of focusor exploration of all society through the Lens of money, because you have theyoung, you have the old. You have these people in the tween. You have workers,you have the Ricks, you have store Ollers, you tention go through theentire tigh class structure and the social structure and the ages as wellas all of these people make these little steps that and updevastating the character we end up following as our lead- and this is this-is kind of the thing too like. If you follow all of this character, we don'tknow that one of them will potentially be our lead. All that were given us akind of equal importance from the kid who ends up Halsion, going along withhis friends, training, fortifying notes to store owners who receive it first tothe first working is for them. This is this vamp of characters involved. Justhow fast, I think, all of this sat up happens in twenty minutes, where themoney has been trailed and the consequences where I related characters.The person who gets blamed for all of this eventually and and ends up havinga life destroyed, really gets quat caught up in it. It's just absolutelyincredible. This whole large, the spectrums, I think what you said abouthis focus on young people. His otio talks to girls with his determinismmight because artists on version of determinism, where basically everyoneover the age of twenty five in these films, seems very set in stone rightand they are the ones that are also in this film, at least influencing theyounger generation right because it all starts with well it's. I guess itstarts with the young high schooler who wants to pay back his friend, but italso comes from his father, not paying him right, and especially, I think thebigger moment is the store owner who is clay, cheating, and that is clearlywhat insides one of em an characters to go into a life of crime. It's funnybecause, essentially Tajon, it could kind of be in trouble of its plots.Cossetin right, it's a young and fleshner character who sees otherpeople, succeed in a life of crime and he is taken by it and eventuallydestroyed by it. I mean you could see that way, but it certainly does notfeel similar at all I mean yeah. I think you could easily adapt Lacham forfor an American audience of focusing you know the car chases and theviolence and the retale the great couch. It's really short, but it's really good.I kind of wish, but so had to now that, but- and I guess that really show isthe gain the contention he can do to quickly if he really wants to- and youfeel attention in that those early moments too, as the monty changed hishand and from character to charity, we see the steps on this ladder beingfollowed. It's it's just. He can't build up so much tension so quickly andget so much done with so much emotion, and then we kind of take a bit of aback seat again as we kind of slow down the development we see jail again,which is like you said, a nice compendium of perpares er. Other filmsthan this is pocus off on Dale sells she's like home, yes, and then you get into the end. I thinkwe do in this case want to spoil the end, but before we do that, I also want to talk a little bit aboutthis. How effectively violence is avoided with with elipses O it just cut the was likesimple, simple cutaways, because I think this scene that's often talkedabout them all of the things that struck me as well. It's just howviolent that punch feels when now the older father punctate quite adultdaughter in the face, but we don't see it it's trapped and we just see herhand with coffee shaking and the coffee's building and there's theviolence in the that shot, and you have that rout to film where violence isjust cut away. In favor of either showing something entirely different orjust an Alitis, where return to something else, and it's so powerful,it's true that there's the bank scene as well and it's something that hedidn't do before, like I think in Asabel Nty of violence against thedonkey, at least I'm trying to think is there sin of violence against humansthat we see very well in another of his films. But that's a good point. I can'treally think of it. You have obviously the fects ofwhat's happening with Maria tink. We see in both of our so I think we seeher puunched, I'm not a hundred percent...

...sure I think so. But you know youcompletely right. I mean even like if you look at this suicide in the openingof a gentle woman, it's very similar. There is a small fight scene in ushed,very small one. Oh yes, spit yeah between osen and remember his name, but the other ropeoste yeah. Yes, but it's very short. So it's not like it's not the hit, but Imean it's definitely something that's new with La Jon. It's there are threekey acts of violence that we only see as I be the results of President Sam at itself ornot necessarily the result, lactate see something before it after its yeahexactly. I think this is the thing we see in many other films at well,including a Edenta woman, where you know we see her going to the ledge tojump and you see a door opening and then the share falling and that's it,and I think these kinds of shot this kind of cut away is something thepresent does incredibly well. But La Font is probably the most perfectshowcase of it, and I guess you know the drug earlier about- has somewanting to make a film with the table? That's a protagonist, but I guess thisone has bank pied as its potages, so that's really spot Tom as well like,but I'm not sure e called a certainly the central team, and that is whatshown like I can, as for the first twenty minutes orso because after that, we kind of struck of the of the will. Yes, yes,but topping to the spoiler section here. Spoiler warning because, after he's been to prison, ourcharacter goes out is completely destroy the he has this kind of load onthis or not that we recognizing so many other characters, the hatred of theworld and this this way of being, and she has men, so many ways beendestroyed by the system and the world around them, but is taken in by thisloving people. This woman, who has no connection to him and the first time Isaw it. I was very computing what the relationship was between them. To Itold me, I was his mother, some the Sumer, but no it's just a woman who outake him in out of sympathy and lethim live there, and this form of kind of there is some kind of understandingbetween them, but it's so cold and then, of course, there's murder at some pointon the start. So so I try to be to talk oit from the start. I think we see thathe follows her because he sees her with the wing money from the bank. I didn'tget him. I guess it's infer to me that that she was unknown and that from thestuff he is planning. He has no bad intentions. I guess that's a reallyinrestine take. I didn't realize it would a been the money from the bank,but his money does go through that thought. It was just trying to rub herto be Onderstandt. It ended up with something else: Yeah Yeah Yeah. I Ithink that Ike, that that's what I mean is that's why he follows a home. Ithink it's just random, yes, and that thing should really looms over all ofthe sick and I feel something is cool to happen. It's again, you have the tension thatpressed on des so well like it's almost like waiting. You know something willhappen. It's like introducing a gun. You know it know something can happen.I don't know what and standing is perhaps even more horrific than youmight have thought he. He murders every single member of that family brutally.But of course it's not shown like you have, for instance, on Elipses, whereyou have the dog running past. These people still alive walking in stairsand then, when the dog runs back they're dead, an essentially just hadthis dog going through room the room and someone is dead in it. It's just ismethodically killing all of them. It's completely awful, but you don't see asingle part of it. What you do see, though, is him carefully stealing themoney from the bedroom drawer yeah. I think it's particular my Besso. Whatwants to say there it's that section that we made me think of venern HallaGobert of much more restrained, her version of those directors, and I thinkit's really effective. I think that's you know the letter we see of the someblood we see and there's the cut with the axe right where he's hittingsomeone with an ax, but he seems to be hitting them not with the cutting pat. I guess that Short isreally powerful and I think there there is a lot of value in not trowing yeahspeaking, I'm not sure if on tree is inspired by Breton Anyway, but I knowthat a notice which one it is right now, but on the gas favorite film is Brestenfilm, so there must be some kind of offer some kind of relationship there an inspiration there.I think I guess I thought of one too in the sense of this very pessimistic viewof humanity and the way you show the hypocrisy of everyone, I don't know Iorelie that they are spastically very different. No, and I think it candefinitely be red completion is, but you do have that, like most extremedegree of again loads of thus like this kind of complete and after miss entropyand disturbing bleakness, that there is...

...just which I think was what pushed meaway the first time I saw it, I didn't low it at all the first time I saw it.I just thought it was well done, because it was just the motion thatcommands just so of put thing to me. It's so harsh, but the second time Ithink I grow to appreciate that harshness. Far More. Yes, basically noemotions, I mean it's all, surely metalist IC, I mean I think we talkedabout earlier, but he's hard to pin down politically on, maybe not that hard,but not so easy, but yes, definitely is he's against materialism. I think wecan say that his S, spiritual filmmaker and I think his main, the main sin hesays in humanity- is attachment to to the world wire attachment to to coldthings like money, so, which is why it feels like a combination of his careerin some sense, even though it's not my favorites, but it is a thing I likerating. It feels appropriate for his final S. Yeah completely agree, and Ijust looked at the Barkingham guess: Favorite film is a sort. Balto are inhis second favorite film is loves LOT TO L. So I think that also show case it'sjust how many fieldmarshal and respect Robert Person- I know- ter cost, forinstance, also helped Risonavan to the directors in the world that heessentially would take an opinion from the other being Bergman Yeah, and youconsistently have so many large masters praising him. It's not an inspirationas one of the people that they see as just the purest examples of a realauthor. I guess in the most extreme way, in the way that the rover and theTreford all of the French de way praised, which I suppose also pie inthe wit, why the new wave loathed him so much. He is something completely unique andwhile he dealt an experiment with so many different ways of minimizingaction, that is just so hard to think of other directors. I know ClementineTin Screen. We have talked a little bit about Hanake. You could mention at adance, but the person is a unique voice on his own. His fields are, some of themost unique in the history of cinema is terms of how stripped down there, howseparate that they are and how they do. For his list of you know ideologicalpoints of views of hot, what cinema of being compress, or rather up to theMathora to being compress to cinema, and that's always so interesting toexplore and it just gains it gives it so much power. Yes, those otherfinmarke or have some aspects of blessing that not all of them, and oneof the things I think makes him special is his ability to stay neutral, or atleast that's how I proceed to to not feel moralistic, even though that's allhis tims are about, but it never feels like he is imposing his more view ofthe world on you now I would do that. I will agree with that. It's overall,when you look at his Femora, I think he's very sorry to make from thebeginning, to the end and one that some was able to find this style quite earlyin this cinematic journey. Who didn't make a lot of film just like you Cubren?He made thirteen, but pretty much all of his films are great films that alldeserve to be seen even his lesser known and less a good one. Let's say no,I completely agree with both of you. I think it's just the fact that past isuniquity. That makes every single film so fascinating to see and personallyand I might have become a particularly big fan out on this rewash. I usuallybore Inis miss for me, but essentially every single film speaks to me assomething powerful. Even you know the ones that affect me less like therewere probably there is that incredible strength in them. Absolutely it'sactually the same for me here I would use the five films I re watched. Iimprove my ratings on three of them. One of them remained to same andthere's one I liked a bit less. Definitely all of his films areextremely great films and Very Jonic in in cinema, at least for a time, andeven though some filmmakers later on as inspired themselves and their work fromthe Sony remains quite unique in the cinematic court now for audience waslistening and into this. Did it this as to MIB a little bit that down, but weare at almost a three hour mark mow, which it's longer than any film RobertBreton ever made. We take section exactly it with the exception ofterrific country priest, which is almost two hours, especially everythingyou made most under ninety minutes, most of them around say I eighty two,eighty five minutes long, so it's just so tree back and that's a kind ofminimalism. I guess we. I do not quite...

...succeed at reaching in this episode,but we also did something. We could also think itwas possible and we talked to an entire demography of Breton. I mean we are theteam of people who spent six hours with a final product o three hour. Justpicking apart. Six films by Eric Romer and is come is a problem cycle. Car Bemanaged to actually cover person properly in a single episode, allthirteen films now, of course, there's so much more to be said about each ofthese films and they could be dived into in details, but I think we reallycovered just why they're so powerful why they affect us the way they do andwhy Robert Bresson, in choosing to separate himself from cinema, acceptingthese rules for himself by creating this ideology, managed to great set offilms that is so different from a norm so powerful in their sparsity andBareness. And one thing I haven't even told would talk about too much in thisepisode. Just the cooler show effect and US reading things into his work,and I think this is something that will continue to exist. I think it'ssomething that could change from reading to reading and betweeneverything, a person seeing one of his works, and it's one of the things thatwill keep makeing the minimes world of Rom Apres as magical prectice, powerfulstrong brutal as it is so with that said. Thank you so much for listeningand juns again soon. You have been listening to talkinginvite official Hoast of ISM FOR COM E T.

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