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Talking Images
Talking Images

Episode 3 · 2 years ago

Spanish Horror Films: The Complete History (1962-Present)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we will attempt to talk you through the entirety of Spanish horror film history, starting from Jesus Franco's The Awful Dr. Orlof and The Sadistic Baron Von Klaus (the first ever two Spanish horror films!), and continueing on through 60s, 70s and 80s Eurohorror onto In a Glass Cage, Anguish, The Day of the Beast, Thesis, The Orphanage, Timecrimes, [REC], Kidnapped and so much more.


Also, get excited: We finish up with a detailed discussion of the recent super-hit The Platform, and our thoughts on the future of Spanish horror.

You're listening to talking images, the officially unofficial podcast of the ICM forum. I'm Chris, and today we have a bit the different show for you. We have taken on the daunting task to try to talk you through the entirety of Spanish horror history, history that started shockingly late. While there are plenty of Spanish language horror films from the s forty is even earlier, the majority of these are from Mexico. Spanish Rag Lef F N UNDRED and twenty one. Why? That's a huge production with a Spanish language cast. In fact, the only Spanish film that was made before the S and is occasionally referred to as a horror film is a tower of the seven hunchbacks from nineteen forty four, and even that's highly questionable. So how, then, did Spain go on to become a most the most prolific exporters of European Horror Cinema? To answer that question, we went back to the very beginning, and it is rare that any period of cinema has such a clear starting point that Spanish horror has. In nineteen sixty two, the first ever Spanish horror film was produced the back the first ever two Spanish horror films were produced and by the one and same director, es is Franco, the prolific, and then, as a prolific, I mean prolific, he has well over two hundred credits called horror favorite. Das Is Franco essentially started and ran essentially the entirety of the Spanish horror industry for years. I mean he is driving force of nineteen sixty s and even nineteen seventy span nic horror, even though so many winged him later. To take this a series, as you possibly could, we set down actually watched the first ever Spanish horror film, the awful doctor oral off, and some of us even made it true to the second bans for a film of one thousand nine hundred and sixty two, so distinct, barren one cloth. And not only that, we also sat down to watch one of the latest and greatest Spanish horror successes, the platform. But we'll say that discussion for the very end. With me today are three wonderful cohosts, Clem, hello, lunch them from friends, and I'm really looking forwards to talk to you through the Spanish or instruments. Tom Hi, it's Tome from Manchester here and we looking forward to exploring Spanish history with you all today. And, last but not least, Saul, yes, some soul and from Australia, being watching films for about nineteen years and I've been interested in horror films ever since the beginning. So it's to be a very exciting topic. So let's just get this started by giving our early impressions of the awful doctor or love. I thought it was really interesting watching the doctor all of film as a pioneer Spanish horror film. But I sort of found when I was watching it is that it wasn't really that much of a horror film. Just to it's a base procedural drama. Is the detective trying to find this doctor all off character. One of the things, which I said a couple of days ago is the most awful thing about Dr all off is the fact that he spends half of the film absent to spend it with this detective and his love interest as they try and track him down, which is the least interesting part of the film. Thought it was interesting, though, that there was a part where the detective is given this newspaper article which complains about himpending all this time with his love interest and not on the case. Interesting stylistically, I thought the beginning of the film was really well done, the sort of dialog free Intro we see this woman being kidnapped by a shadowy figure. I'd sort of after that and quite go where you want it to go, because then it becomes all about the detective rather than Dr all off so solve summarize what happens in the awful doctor all off quite nice like. So I'll go off in my opinion on what I thought the film and a huge horror fun how is probably my favorite genre, so I was quite excited to go back and watch what was the first Spanish horror film. It did start really well. The Omens seems quite gripping, but then after that started with the everly long exposition and characters who you didn't really care for. It came difficult to become emotionally invested in the events of the film and, as Sault said, the element of horror is kind of lacking. You don't really see much in terms of violence or go perhaps that was quite normal for the for that era, but there's nothing that really horrifies or scares in this and, to be honest, it feels like quite a tepid entry into horror for the first Spanish out in that we see. I'm joining with what son and already said about the film. I thought some parts we're just straight out boring, with some story that the viewer didn't really cared about what I, at least I didn't cared about, and it is not what I'm looking for in the horror film.

I think it's still an important film to watch as it's piece of film history for for Spain, but as a north film in itself, I not sure it's deserving of the hype some are giving it. Yeah, I think that the only reason this film consistently POPs up on Benefer Games need to see is because it is the first. There's not much else really going around here. Also really like to focus on one thing. At those absolutely hilarious the amount of this incredible exposition like this was the very first scene, or the way first, the scene where our heroical lyad is introduced, where he and his lady love just walk through the entire way they met. And then later on, is he the bad guy? DOCTER oral of go through, with the one case assistance, the entire history of about two minutes as the exploded laning. The entire motivation of everything is doing as if none of them knew it before. The amount of exposition in this film is absolutely incredible. What one thing I actually almost really fascinating here is that Franco made to copies of the Alpha doctor or love, one specifically for Spanish and British censors and then an additional one for slightly sleezy ors, I give are open minded markets, where he included a lot of even graphic nudity as opposed some slight. I'm not sure what else they chat but let's just say that it's a clean version and then there's a sleezy version with love. I would say surprising. I to this the day just th don't mention, based on something which Chris was saying, that it Blake orphny crops up in all these film cannons because it's a pioneer horror film. Actually thought it was quite well done stylistically, with a lot of shadows darkness and Really Great Interiors and great beside long distance shots and carrying the bodies at night. Whether these really good parts are only ever very intermittent because it is such a detective story, but I think there's quite a bit of interest to it. Maybe not top a hundred horror film Canon Worthy, but I thought it was an interesting film, just a very highly flawed film, as you probably expect from a pioneer horror film from a country. I think I would agree with you, Saul, but I think that's the other sound that we saw the sadistic baron Bune close fit what you described even more absolutely. I think that if you compare off of doctor oral off to the distinct parable clouds, you see in incredible progression just in terms of cinematic techniques, statisticct parabolen clouds. It's again with the well shot film. It's lovely to look at. It does not think that is extraordinary, but it feels like this a thoroughly competent, wellmade film. If I remember correctly, the general consensus after watching the film was that it was quite average. I think yok appreciated it a bit more than than we did, but overall, I remember we were quite surprised that how well made it was. We also, I remember we said stuff like this doesn't feel like Franco film because we were so used of what he would do later on in his career, more sex quotation type of film, and here we had a well shot black and white film which wasn't really such a more film. It was more of a thriller type of film. I remember us being quite surprised at how well made it was done. I've reached for its time, yes, but nicely shot, with a no Kay stories. Honestly, I think it is one of Franco's underrated films. One thing that both of us also called is all the of a doctor or love, and the distinct parable clouds were set in completely different countries. So the first was that in France, the second was that in Germany, and when we did some research in this we found something quite interesting. But to tell us a little bit about the club. To talk about what we found, I think it's important to give a little context about what Spain was going through at the time. Back then, films during the S and s were mostly made to be exported. At the time Franco was in power, didn't cared about fantasy films or films because they thought they were inoffensive and without any social impact. They only add one requirement for those films to be made is that the films to take place outside of Spain. There were two reasons. First, the first reason was that any underlying social commentary was impossible. Well, at least they sought so, and the second reason was that didn't want it, any monster or any piece to soil the ground of Spain, which is why so many films or films from this period are located in different country, as you said, trends or Germany, and...

...this also made it really easy to export them. The majority of early span the fields were co productions. They had past members that were known in other countries as well, and it made them fit incredibly well in with what was happening in Italy, Invest Germany and across this really core group of countries that have later been known as the Euro warror countries. Yes, as you mentioned, a lot of these films were co productions and most of the time two versions of the film would be made like, for examples, Dr Nor, a more explicit version in term of violence and sexuality for the European markets and the more centered one for as of stunch market. The only other Spanish horror film that I think I've seen from the N S is a movie called English, the House that screamed. I'm not sure how to pronunciation correctly for the original title, so I won't go with that. I found that to be a quite two pointing horror film. Similar and ways to Dr all off, because it's not really a horror film. A half of it's a mystery film. This you go and rolling up the sporting school and student seemed to be disappearing. I don't see anything horrific until the second half and it's only really the ending of the film to really put into horror territory. Most of it's just I'm or at a boarding house. Some parts of it are really strange also, like the teenage girls. They shower with their clothes on it. Maybe because it was better for the sensors at the time, I don't know, but I just thought it was an interesting companion piece to Dr all off as an Austraight forward horror film, because it's mostly a detective story. I saw at the time when I was exploded, doing a lot of yellow films and I was in that period of my life and I really loved horror, and especially y'all bow and to me it fits so well in with that cannon of films. It had the same kind of who seeing heat did atmosphere. You know, the kind of odd sexual chemistry that you will feel in Mariobob and lose your fill state films. So thought that it did capture that really, really well. All Right, Chris, there is a lot going on in the house at screen from a sexuality point of view. It's just that as a horror film yet it's more jallow in prime thriller aspect but again not really in the horror aspect until really ending five minutes. Even reading through some of the letterbox comments, and I'm DB comments off with, a lot of people were praising it as a horror fam were based on that last five minutes, as it really isn't a horror film until them, which is just really interesting. Just again to compare with the doctor all off film, which is also not quite a hundred percent a horror film. I think that all sun interesting commentary on horror films in general before the s really carried it away because if you look at, say, everything going back, especially before psycho and deeping Tom, most horror films were in the thriller horror kind of weird twilight somewhere do inter mingled. Same with Y'Allgo. They all started out as a combination of crime procedurals or thrillers and then care in into something that was slightly more horrific. Yeah, I'll probably agree with that in general, especially if you think about things like the Val lute and horror films of the s. A lot of it wasn't very explicit horror. And yes, it probably wasn't until peeping Tom or, you got to see things from the killers point of view, that we actually get that explicit of horror building up in the S, I guess, maybe ulminating in the s with stuff like the wizard of Gore from sure Gordon Lewis, which is actually an interesting gain, a bit of a companion piece maybe, or compare and contrast to Dr all off. Again, it's about a character doing some really horrific things and again it's focused on a detective investigating it. But in the wizard of Gore what the antagonist, it does, actually is really explicit, is really shocking at it is really interesting, also really interesting postmodern horror film. But yeah, again, that was I'm as yet to come, and that was eight years after Dr all off. So for me I suppose it was the s where Spanish horror really took off to the most notable films in this period kind of ramped it up in the terms of sadism and what was shown on screen. Assaul mentioned with the wizard of core. Things were getting a bit more brutal and traumatic for the viewer by this point. So the first one I I'd like to mention is the balfom hell, which was made in one thousand nine hundred and seventy three now. This is a fascinating film about a young man who is really least from an insane a silent and he returned home to get revenge on his aunt and her three daughters, who may have declared him insane, to...

...steal his inheritance. It's really playful film, quite a black comedy, but there's some strong elements of horror throughout, and I thought an interesting fact here is that the director, Claudio Aquarian he actually fell from the Bell Tower on the last day of shooting and was killed and the film was actually finished by another director. So it was a shame that we never got to see any more work from him, because the bell from how it's an accomplished work. It's not without its flaws, but it showed a lot of promise and showed how Spanish horror was evolving. The next one I wanted to mention was who can kill a child, quite an infamous film from one thousand nine hundred and seventy six. It's obviously got sort of quite a lot of cultural significance, but it's still thrilling from modern audiences. It involves two tourists who rive at an island where all the children have gone insane and it killing the adults. It's heavy on atmosphere and this quite a lot of violence, and it's one that I would also highly recommend. It's also about pointing out that will good kill a child is made by the very same director of who did the House that's dream. It's an interesting point, Chris, because I act really liked can kill a child, but I didn't get that much out of the house. That screened very different films and I guess with the seven is between them, horrid genre had come around a lot around the world and I guess we see the reflected insh horror cinema also, because couldn't kill a chart is very horrorsting memory. It's still takes around twenty minutes to actually warm up and get them on the island or the first quarter of the film isn't really horror alive, but the last three quarters really is, and it is a really interesting film, with a lot of the power of it coming from where the kids seem to communicate just through looks and stairs at each other, without communicating out loud, which makes it a lot creepy. Yeah, also think it's really great how Tom gave a shout out till bell from Hell. They'll be one of my favorite films that I've discovered for the first time this year. Agree that it works really well because it's a black comedy in a way, if the practical jokes that this guy has been released from the insane asylum is playing on his relatives, and there's one part where, you know, I burst out laughing where he's trying to air this neighbor by saying that all these children have died and the mom thinks that they're going to come back as ghosts and they start up hearing and just gets terrified leaves. But I'd also just mentioned that. It also played out a lot to me, or reminded me a bit, of Harold and Maud, which only came out a couple of years before bell from a hell, just with the very morbid sense of humor again playing very gaulish practical jokes. Things take a bit of a different Spin and Belle from hell and a lot of it. So also about the way society works in general. I think one of the Linstromma is there's no differences, only rules. When he's asked about right or wrong. It's about pushing those limits of morality and limits of guess what we think is acceptable, which is very interesting, just with that progression of Finish Cinema and horror cinema around the world, where things getting much more explicit in the s by won't remember if who could kill the child will set in Spain. Have no idea will settle in Ireland. Callers was also the main characters for English tourists because it just remembered that who could go a child was made in one thousand nine hundred and seventy six, which is the year after Franco, the dictator, not the director, by meaning that, if correctly, Spain at this point was no longer ready to paint the ship and perhaps they started to have more artistic freedom as well. That's actually really interesting point. Chris. I haven't seen the film recently and maybe we could look at it metaphorically, and so maybe the children are like the Spanish people. But I react again rebelling, not against the adults but, I guess, against Franco after he is leadership ended. We spoke earlier about the character we seek after Spanish fantasy and or cinema. Back then, when Spain still in the dictatorship, he went to main scenes in Spanish or cinema. The first one was revenge, being from the past, coming back to avenge's death, usually dawne in a violent fashion, and the second one was a strong ereticism, which would be seen as a way to challenge sexual repression that was going on during Franco dictatorship. I think that was interesting. Here is that with Franco passing, the amount of horror films Spain're putting out, we're actually starting to slow down. So when you look at amount of Spanish portans actually produced, they hit the high in one thousand nine hundred and seventy three, two years before Franco died. In the late years of the S, production amount slowly started to decrease until they almost disappeared in the S and S, which is really interesting and I think that...

...it might just have been a general norm, because we see a similar trend in Italy as well, where you just had this extraordinary amount of y'all leading into slashers, etc. In the S and S, until in the early s this horse in just disappeared. It might just be that your horror as marketable cinema started to decrease. We see this almost not quite sudden, but very clear and vary steady decline at the end of the s. One thing that also are happening in this is a bit of a strange trend, is that during the s the majority of horror output from space in whilst indeed be to see moving territory. This as the Ural horror drive in cinema that US citizens were supposed to but in the S, after this rather extreme decline, he started to see some very artistically interesting pieces of Spanish or cinema, including in a glass cage. And, of course, anguish in a glass cage is another one of my favorite film discoveries from this year. It's a really interesting film and it's really is straight forward horror film. It's more like a psychological thriller. Going into it, I was heard it described as a more serious apt pupil Stephen King Adaptation for the S, which in my interest. And it's about a utsie and it's a very interesting film because the Nazi as to commit suicide, is now in an eye and long and he can't breathe, he can't move for him self and a young man comes and volunteers to be as nurse and there's something definite going on between them, but the film keeps it very elusive or about the first third, maybe even the entire half, water exactly is going on and how the young man knows him. It's really interesting film more for the things which happened the second half. Would you kind of talk about without spoilers? That's when it really turns into horror territory. It all culminates an extremely interesting ending. Ending is the interesting because it's all about the cycle of abuse and there's a child who is the daughter of the Nazi and the role that she ends up playing within the whole revenge or getting back scheme the young man has with the Nazi. So or gets involved. Nobody escapes from the violence cycle and some people described the ending as really disturbing with what happens I think it's just thematically really appropriate and it was a really haunting film. The other s horror film that I've seen from Spain is actually one from the early S, cord the Sea Serpent. I'm not highly recommended. It's a very lame, oh budget film, but just showing what Spain was doing back then. It's actually set in Portugal or the coast of Lisbon, about this gigantic monster coming and attacking, horsing chaos and there's music score which is sort of a copy of John Williams score to jewels. The monsters really doesn't look very good. It really poorly done and when the lead actor first reacts to it you don't know if he's reacting out a fry or whether he's just to how poor the monster looks. It's got Timothy Bottoms in it in the lead actor is a really great actor from the s. The last picture show the pay purchase, a very good act. So I don't know, I got tired to the production, but it's an interesting film just to see where the depths of Spanish horror ended up vomiting and I don't know if I'd recommend it myself, but the film's apparently very popular and Portugal. I've got a friend over there. He was telling me for years and I have to see it because such a big film from them, because it was filmed at the coast of Lisbon and he knows different locations in there. Looking objectively, it's a very weak point, especially considering two years lady, they go from the sea serpent too, in a glass cage. I think there's also such a really good comparison point to what happened to Italy that point where the American actors or international actors came to Italy and here pain to be able to get a quick paychack essentially, and take part in something that would be easily put together and roll out. Is it is neatly do it, among others, Joseph cotton and there's a long, long list of other actors. And then it ended, and it ended suddenly and it ended nothing, say rotastically, but it was over and we start seeing films like in the glass case, she said, just a few years later and we can just see the difference. Mean, the glass case is just beautifully shot, beautifully made. It it's it's a really, really, really good film. It's a...

...really good point. Chris in terms of how beautiful in a glass cages it actually looks very luscious. There's lots of striking we lose in their lots of dark rooms, really good settings, and yet it tolds a really horrific tail at the same time. So yeah, extremely interesting film, extremely artistic. They complete opposite of the sea serpent for two years before the very next year one of Spain's most interesting, most revolutionary, most met the horror films were produced, anguish, and once again this was a field that was made for international audiences. I'll shot entirely in Spain. If I recall correctly, we have an entirely English speaking cast and the film was shot in English. Now, what makes this film so incredibly special is that it ties and blends the reality of cinema with the reality of the real world. Our to lead characters, if you will, or our eyes what's happening, or two young girls for watching a film at the cinema and then what they're seeing starts to merge into reality. As Chris said, anguish is one of the highlights of Spanish horror cinema from the s from the offset, it's unclear where anguish is headed. It first represented with what appears to be a graphic Italian slashes like it Jello. But then the initial storyline segues into another in knowing, conventional yet intrigue and fashion, and there's the link between the two storyline. This becomes more tangible. This is kind of where the fund really begins. Throughout anguish there's a central motive of hypnotism, and this is established by introduction to the killers mother, who was played by Zelda Rubinstein, and she possessed the ability to control the mind of her doating. So on, this gift is used for evil purposes, and the powershu exists over an is strong enough to spill over into the minds of other submissive individuals. One of the film's standout scenes is perhaps an exaggerated portrayal of this hypnotism in action, where viewers could be forgiven for fearing that they too might secume to the twisted grip of her psychic power. Along with the fascinating visual effects, it is Rubinstein's aptin talent that adds credence to these spell binding scenes. She's well known for her role as the medium in the POLTERGEIS series and a creepy performance in anguish demonstrates once again why her presence can be so beneficial to genre films. They require a distinctive character. Chris mentioned that it's a self referential, Meta Horror Film and films that Blur the line between horror, fiction and reality became more popular in the mid s due to where's craven scream and new nightmare. The genre continues to thrive to this day. Films such as rubber and the cabin in the wood attractor coup following among horror funds. But back in the S, when the idea of not really been explored to its fullest anguishes, astonishing amalgamation of fiction and reality should have spotted a series of imitators, but instead it kind of remains almost like an anomaly in the genre, and overlooked and perhaps often forgotten horror, but one that has been reappraised over the years and stands out as one of my personal highlight of eighty Spanish horror, and let's not forget that incredibly tense atmosphere. This involved the tensest films I've ever seen. As a point of all, they almost start becoming paralloid yourself, and I just cannot imagine the experience of seeing this in a peater, being in the exact same situation as the protagonists. That must have been true pure horror. I always think that if there's one film that I would have loved to have seen in the cinema for the first view, and it would definitely be anguish. I can't imagine how it must have felt if you'd gone to the cinema back on its first release, not knowing what you were about to see, and then to sit down and witness that creative film. It must have been quite a traumatic and immmorable experience. So if there's anyone listening, who ever gets the chance to see some kind of retrospective in view it in the cinema the first time, I would jump on that opportunity straight away and, if you have seen it, tried to bring your friends. Was One of the reasons why anguish just disappeared, which is truly dragic. Is Big unders in them at this point. It there even this even one year and s believe, Nin hundred and ninety two even, not a single scorror film was produced in Spain. But then something change. There were two relatively successful films. It came out one in nine and ninety five they have the beast, which is just a crazy dark comedy. It's a little bit Charlish, a little bit you now, but it's an incredible film. And then, on a slightly smaller...

...scope, pieces which in some ways took several polks at Spanish cinema and utilize the same kind of self referential style as a scream, where you have people studying films, obsessed about films, becoming entangled in a similar story. My first soot when I was watching the day of the beast is how big the budget must have been when the filmon made, and I find it very interesting to see how Spain went from those cheap be movies in the s two more high budget films thirty years later in the s. But the day of the based is really interesting horror film because it's got very strong comedy overtones to it. Also, there's a lot of Spanish horror films, I think, before that point. That's such a pronounced comedy angle in there, all about a praise trying to make a pact with the devil and having to learn to be evil, and it's really mad. It's a bit over the top, it's really funny. It's got an ending in there which makes you go well, I don't know, you know, it's very memorable ending in there. I recently saw a another horror film by the same director which is again got a lot of comedy and it called the bar just seems to be something which and yours, I guess, these days this can do really well with injured introducing the comedy and intwining it with horror. Just jumping into mension that the director of the of the beast is a lex delight Glacia, who is said they haven't seen any other films from but is seem to be one of the essential cult directors of Spain, especially for people who got into films around the mid S and continued to watch this kind of cold horror comedies in the early two the day of the beast was the first Alex so I glaze a film that I saw and I absolutely loved it, and since then I've sought out pretty much every film that he's worked on and it's interesting that soul mentions the streak of that comedy that runs through its films. There's a lot of human and he tackles a lot of different angles from horror perspective. Cities. One called the last circus which is closely linked into this Spanish civil war is one called witching and bitching, which looks at witchcraft, and it's just interesting to see us take on all the year different angles and the perspectives of horror, linking it back into thesis. It's it's kind of interesting to see the different paths that those two directors have taken, because Alexter glaziers stay tuist Spanish roots and continues to make films in Spain set in Spain. The director of thesis, Aleandrew Amner Oar. He then went on to make open your eyes, but then he also worked on the obice and kind of went off to Hollywood. So it's interesting to see the different paths that go for those directors talk from their early days. You love iron it there, isn't it? Because in jieces there is a scene where one of the professors a film schools specifically says that banish filmmakers need to start making the kind of films that people want to see because Spanish Cindema is destroyed and the Hollywood is crushing them. And then of course he goes on to well leave and join the winning side. I'M gonna boy left for Hollywood teases, along with the of the beast, who seemed to be the beginning of some kind of artistic regnition into the horror Gendra in Spain, because there's a few years later he started to see some of the most breathtaking, interesting, in critically acclaimed horror films coming up of Spain. I'm talking, of course, of Devil's backbone and pants laboring, both made by Glare Model Laurel so Goomo del Toro is a Mexican director, but he's fascinated with the Spanish civil war and the is an event that he'd come to know is one of the most horrific yet unrecognized times in history, something he's grown up reading about and hearing about. So he wanted to explore the root of it and try and reflect that in his horror films, and it's interesting that the supernatural horror that is present in his films is often secondary to the stark situations that innocent children found themselves in. As Chris mentioned, the cinematography in his films is absolutely breath taken. He shoots films that genuinely undersettling and creep under your skin, and he continues to create excellent films, though he's moved away from his subsession. With the Spanish civil war in two thousand and seven, interesting happened. Three of the most notable Spanish horror films are made in one goal, the Orphaner, time crimes and n pre completely different...

...films, the orphan's being a really well made, beautiful is shot, restrained, well acted. This is traditional horror story, time crimes being this ti Fi allocaust of emotion and tension and, of course, the found foot the film red, which played a major park in the resurger of the farm footage Shambra and has bombed several Z equals. Chris is absolutely right here. rull excellent wreck for me, remains one of the few films that has truly terrified me. It's an incredibly tense found footage horror, setting apartment block where as a breakout and infection that seems to be spreading through the inhabitants and the apartment is put on lockdown. By pure chance, fire crew go to answer call there and they are filming a documentary about the experiences the fire crew and capture all of the action on camera. For those who have seen it, they will know there's a scene towards the end setting the to the building that first time I saw it I was left on the edge of my seat, couldn't move, just waiting to see what was happening. I didn't find it to overall be an extremely effective film. The first half of it was really great. I love the whole idea of the ambitious rapport trying to carry on this news story. I believe there's a part where there's a woman crying and she tells her to stop because seeds to record it, because the microphone didn't pick up the woman crying. So she just completely oblivious to all the horror going on and yet in the second half of the film she's sort of becomes a victim of a horror. There's an interesting dynamic. I found the second half of the film much weak. A lot of the found footage stuff is things like I've seen already and the addicts scene. I guess it is technically well filmed, but that sort of ending as just something which I felt was really familiar, which I've seen a lot. Yeah, it's a time I'm to reckon with with reck trying to work out just how the film it is. The probably was one of those pioneer films and maybe if I'd seen it earlier my film going journey I would have liked two more. On the other hand, you've got a film like time crimes. That one made a really huge impact on me. I'm a really big fan of time travel films and time paradox films. I don't want to give too much away, but the film explore some really interesting dynamics in there. It does reveal quietly on there is a time machine, but the way it works I'm not going to reveal because that's best left on spoiled. You sort of watching the whole time going. It's going to be a twelve monkeys type of film, where you know can't change time at all, or about to the future type of film. We actually can change time because try and travel out all those different possibilities, but it's extremely interesting film. The third one the orphanage. I was actually not a big fan of that either and when I saw I thought, Oh, there are some interesting things there. You're not sure what she's imagining, what's real what's not real, but I found the whole thing really sentimental. Really Mordelin didn't sort of really end with a lot of horror pronounce there and actually thoughts. For I saw the film the impossible with me Wat's from the same director, and I just thought, oh, it's like another sentimental film like that, which is a bit of a shame because there is a bit of atmosphere in there. There is some ideas about spirits thinking like echoes, but a lot of that I've also seen in earlier one of films like polder guys. So Orphanage didn't do too much me. Wrecked it a little bit more for me, but I think time crimes and watch, I can't discussed too much without spoilers, is really my favorite of those three films. I'm quite curious. So I'm wondering whether you've seen any of the other wreck sequels, because reck was so successful that it actually spawned number of follow ups. Wreck to, I think, is almost up there with the original. I'm not in any way comparing these films to the films I'm about to discuss, but I like to view them from the suspective of alien and aliens. So reck introduces a story and then wreck to just do something completely different with that story, takes it to another place. That, for me, was really surprising and I got a lot out of that. The following films try again to do different things with the franchise, removing themselves from the found footage perspective, but they don't really come across as well as the first two films. So have you seen wreck to or any of the follow on? So I have this second wreck film on DVD, have borders and next rental on the cheek quite recently, but I've sat down to watch it yet. So actually might be something I'll watch this month. I wasn't going to prioritize it because, like I said before, the first film didn't exactly well me. Now that you've mentioned it does something different are that does Pique my interest. I'll put the second rip film I watch was now you're a comparison between alien aliens is...

...really good and unfortunately, if an aliens lesser of the do I think a really completely with Saul in that it was the first half of red that was really interesting. That's where all of the world building and there is spense were coming from, and in the last half of reg one you just get proml with all of the standard cliches. It well, it's done really well, but but that's largely one. It is you feel the terror, but it is what you expect. And then I really felt that in wreck too, it does continues down that line. It lost a kind of special tension building this larger world of the first film and then goes all in for a horror elements. It's interesting, Chris, that you mentioned the sheer terror from wreck and wreck to and I think perhaps that's maybe why I'm a little forgiving when it comes to the film's inhering flaws, because it is just such a terrifying experience watching it that it's easy to become wrapped up in the in the sheer horror and the moment. And for me that's what happened the first time I watched it, and the second one perhaps not so much just terrified, but I was so invested in these characters and excited to see where the story went, and and I wasn't disappointed. I think, following on from wreck, the next notable horror for me is sequestrados, or kidnapped, which is English title. Now it came out of two thousand and ten and by this point the wave of home invasion horror it's kind of passed. It was kind of at the end of the life cycle, so to speak, but this, the mean, remains one of its high points. It's a brutal and traumatic experience. It's a film that is made up of twelve long takes, and this enhances the tension in the realism, as we see family who are assaulted by gang outsiders after their money, and we learn more about the motivations as the film goes on. It's really quite a sickening and twisted film, quite explicit in parts, but it's one that if you do enjoy brutal films, I'm sure everyone who likes that kind of thing will get a big kick out of this. So the director of kidnapped, Miguel and GLL vegus. For a while I thought that he could have been a great Spanish director. After watching this film, I was eagerly waiting to see where he was going to go. But, to be honest, as follow up films have been quite disappointing. And you may know him for the director who tried to remake inside, the infamous French horror to little success, and since then he seems to be mostly working TV. So, sadly, it seems to be a bit of an anomaly in his career. But if you haven't seen sequestry, try to say I can't recommend it highly enough. Thanks for those comments on kidnap Tom that sounds like a really interesting film. It's not one that I've come across in my journey so far. I've seen a few other thousand intends horror films from an a, possibly most notably leap tight, which is from the same director as wreck but does something very different. It opens up with this guy sleeping in the bed with a woman. I gets up, he showers, he goes down for his job where he's working at the front of the hotel or building that she is in it, and then she sees him and you suddenly realize that are that I actually know each other that intimately and as the film goes on, you see how he uses his power working in the hotel or housing building just to get into all the guests rooms. And that's really interesting becauseoo film plays on the insecurity that we might fill on our own homes and we actually should. Should be the most secure place that we could possibly be. And there's an extremely intense part where it gets locked in a room when the woman who's targetings there with a lab and is to try and talk his way out. So very interesting film. Another one which borderlines horror would be the skin I live in from Pedro Armadova's a hard one again to talk about without giving too much of it away. It's sort of like Bob vertigoing away with a bit of a horror edge to it. least to remind me of that a lot with some of the music, score staff and the way the batagonist would look at the female character and observer. But there's a lot going on there which can't really get into without talking too much about and giving too much away. I also recently saw Julia's eyes, which is produced by del Toro Up. So really starts film. It begins off really well with this woman investigating her sister's suicide and believe that she didn't really kill herself...

...and somebody else was there and there's apparently this person following her who can't be seen properly because he's sort of invisible. Film loses its way as it goes along and the whole invisibility thing becomes a metaphor for how people get ignore and society. Lots of our decent thrills and chills throughout a specially in the first half of the film, and there's a lot of eyesight things going in there which I haven't even mentioned. The other one I might just give a quick plug to it is a film called the bar which is from the director of of the beast, about all these patrons who get and get trapped in a coffee shop. But basically two people get spiped. Snipers attacked them from outside their coffee shop and they get too scared to leave and there's lots of Paranoi about what's going on. Why isn't there anybody in the news reporting any of this? And then there's an effect option. They are losers, while a little bit wants the characters to start they know what's going on. But again, like the base, ends with an end they which sort of also flips everything a bit on its head. Quite a few interesting as Spanish horror films and we get up the something like the platform, which is racially put over on Netflix, which will be discussing in a lot of death really soon. One thing I found interesting about deep tight is that the main protagonist of the film is the bad guy. We know that what he is doing is wrong, but however, since he is the protagonist, we kind of want him to succeed in a way, we don't want him to get caught. I think Saul mentioned a scene where there is the main character facing the woman's lover, and I remember feeling a bit of tension hoping that the main character would actually escape, even though, given what he was doing, the normal thing to do would be to hope for him to get caught. But here, since into the main character, we kind of route for him, let's say, you hope he is not getting caught. So I saw as I thought it was an interesting, interesting take on home invasion film. Usually we been this type of films. We see is a family perspective, but it was the first film I saw which that called the home invasion Genera by using the bad guy, let's say, perspective. Yeah, I would totally agree with that, Clem. It's a very interesting film from that point of view. We really feel for the Louis Tosak character the whole way through and we want them to survive. This who wanted to get out of him, though he's doing all these terrible things. I guess he just becomes a really interesting character. The way everything is meticulously planned. Maybe it's because it's the way it's set up and he is the best developed character we everything. It's really interesting. We end up really routing for him and there's are from memory, this little girl the building who knows what he's up to doing is sort of don't wanted to dob him in. So we sort of want them to succeed and I guess we just plays a really lonely guy. Sort of got that impression from him. What he's doing is maybe just a way of expressing feelings and wanting to be a bit more closer and a bit more intern with people and not knowing how to. Yeah, I found him yere thorwing, capsite character and I really wanted him to succeed, which he has, Clem said, the ordinarily one and one that sort of characters to succeed at what he's doing. So moving on to what in many ways to be the climax of this week's episode, the platform one of deep most recent and most successful Spanish horror film. Like I mentioned in the beginning, we all sat down, we all watched it and given or to discuss at the very beginning of this episode, where no films are allowed to be set in Spain and no fear films we allowed to Britique the status quo. This is such a beautiful finale because, if anything, the platform is one of the most clear and obvious social commentaries in cinema history. Our lead character wakes up in what appears to be a prison cell and there's a hole in the floor. Yes, one cell mate, and every single day a platform comes through his cell, through this whole and it's covered in food, eaten food. It's disgusting. If I called corrected their own floor for the eight which is not from the bottom but from the top. Both characters peer into the hole and see and seemingly endless amount of floors above and belove them. And then something starts to develop. Let's do this a quick round table of the film. Starting with Tom I thought the platform was great sci fi horror. There's a fascinating concept at the core and the directive exploits his allegory to maximum effect with the horrid he puts...

...his characters through. Sought platform was really interesting because, getting into it, I add some preconceptions of water would be like. I thought would be a bit like the Vincenzo Natalie Film Cube and a bit like Snow Piers, with the lack of food supply and how that changes by the end of the film. I end up getting a slowly different vibe from it. The snow piers comparison is quite good, though it's really similar in some ways, but we will not get into that. The probably be spoiling the film a bit too much. I do think, though, that one part of the large trick of the film that's not really a spoilers worked into it the right way, is the fact that the floor these two cellmates our arm will change and will change every single month. It's also important to understand that just this massive platform filled with food is always coming from the top, and the lower down you are, the less food you will get because everyone above you will have taken dare pick. First, and one of the most interesting and I suppose one of the main things that they want us to take away from this film, is when the seal make Telso Protargon is that he should not speak to the people below them because they are below them, and they should not speak to the people about because they won't listen, because they're about them. And regardless of rich floor, this person seems to be on. He hates the people above for being above him and being pastors, and he hates the people below because they're below them. It seems to have a very clear point that wherever you are into side, it the that's your point of reference and that the people above you or do are just the body of the people below you are just below you, and that runs through the film so incredibly well. The suppose it's taken to its extreme by the fact that these people will be anywhere in the extreme class hierarchy at any given point. Every single month, dear place will change, but their impression at this impression of the cell made as the change. So the journey that we take through this unsettling architectural nightmare follows what it fear. Seems to be kind of a kindhearted man who strangely volunteered to enter the platform, but he soon regrets this decision. As is amicable natures, is pushed to the the very limit. The foul conditions of this brutal prison take it's tall on his mental and physical condition, particularly as, when Chris mentioned, the inmates are relocated at random to new level in the platform every thirty days, and the director subjects us to all kinds of depravity, as we witnessed violent deaths and decapitations, alongside a parent defecation and even attempted rape. So I suppose viewers of a sensitive nature might want to steer clear of this one, but those who are open to dark and delirious rides through hollish scenarios will surely relish that the twisted delights on offer here. And it's strange to think back to the first ever Spanish horror film that we watched yesterday. You can compare it to wear Spanish horrors now. The contrast is just huge. There's no other way of putting it. Platform is really interesting it for the way we see how Spanish horror, like Thomas said, has changed so much over the past fifty, eight, almost sixty years. From Dr All off, it's not really so much of a horror film. It's not really critical of society to the platform where it's very highly metaphorical for everything going on in society and the problems with greed and sharing and people above people below and not communicating properly. Did have some issues with the film which I don't think it properly resolves and left me a little bit wanting. I wasn't bored of thing. It ever, really quite made it clear what the purpose of the building was, which was something I sort of wanted to find out a little bit more of before the end. Is it's this great big experiment or not? They guess not knowing the answers as a sort of like not knowing the answer to the meaning of life. So I may with it does need to be answered. What did it really take me and plague me more in the day since watching it, is that our protagonist brings along a book into the platform, because everybody's I'll bring one item. He brings a book. All these other people bring knives and weapons and ropes and things to climb by. What I was wondering is, how did they know to bring a weapon and how did they know bring something to help and climb, and yet he didn't know anything about that. I was really unclear on how much each of the characters knew about before going into the platform, especially because he volunteered...

...to a first salemte was born there without really getting the chance to volunteer. Yeah, a lot of things which were quite clear to me and I wasn't sure of that was on purpose or the way it was done, because we get sort of bits of inform measure of your to US along the way. I can see where you're coming from their Sol because there is quite a lot of ambiguity throughout the film. But I think that adds to the sense of mystery and also it places the viewer in this position where it's a puzzle and we are trying to work out exactly what is going on behind this this platform, and that, for me, it drew me into the film because I was eager to find out more. And although you're right that it was kind of unsatisfying that we didn't get all the answers that perhaps were hoping for, I felt that the direction that the film went in kind of worked perfectly with with the setup. Didn't think it could have ended any other way. Really the impression that in this film's universe there will still a fascist dictatorship. If you could hear them all talking about this administration, and especially one of the character who was working for them, doctorhows, I've been working for his being for twenty five years, and the kind of things as he had seen. And it also ties into how much people know as oppose because, like was mentioned, our main character volunteered. The majority of characters are in. There seems to have been criminals, people who committed some crime or another and were sentence there and got this as a choice. So it could be a case where the criminal or the people who get centered through the court system has some additional information, but the people who go in from the general public it simply don't know because of the misinformation David heard. It's very clear from our mentreat that he has no idea what this is. He joins this project because he wants to quit smoking. That's his reason for joining. Other people seem to be joining because they want to lose weight, while the majority are there because they were sentenced to be there. Something I will point out, and I think that's a good point. What believed Tom Mention that it's really hard to imagine another way for the film tend and it possibly is better not having all the explanations, because it's like him if you don't really understand everything and always told everything and yet you still get the basic idea, is to get basic gist of what society is like from watching without knowing everything about its interesting is that there is one IMDB review which reckons that the people were promoted to higher levels in the platform waction, the ones who are more of violent killing the film made or trying to survives, like the more violence you are, the higher you go up, as follow you are, the further you go down. But I have no idea how it could possibly measure it. But it's a very interesting theory. Yeah, not for how that logical top but they're being it could be, without spoiling anything, that that could be true, but it's something that's really, really hard to tell. I think one of the characters that seem to end up quite high at one point had not heard anyone before. Again, I don't know. It's just a theory. Don't know how a Liabel it is. I might really watch the film at some stage. I really like how the platform can work on more than one level, because you can just sit back and enjoy it and watch it for a spectacular horror film, you know, enjoy all the violence, the grewsome aspects of the film, but then you can scratch under the surface and look into like the political allegory behind it and it adds meaning into a bloody and violent film and it elevates the spectacular concept to almost made the platform become a thought provoking picture with quite a valuable message at the heart. It has. It has a really valuable message, or at least it opens up some really uncomfortable questions. I mean throughout this film is see characters try to interact with each other, between the platforms, between the cell mates, etc. And you get this a day of what could make this work, because what is known right the way is that the Lord level you are on, the less food you get, the more scraps you get, the more likely or to get violent and more likely you are to go insane. And you have this Andamic that where your actions should save lives. The people on the top could choose to indulge themselves less and ensure that the people below them got more food and could live like decent human beings. And it's even sent up like that, with plates for every single person in this system. But they don't. Not Going to get into what happens towards the end of the film are because I would be a pretty extreme boiler. But what we see is that it ask the questions how can people form a kind of solidarity to help others survive and themselves survived, because this is the thing. Your position in this hierarchy changes decisions you made when you're on top, all the people who play place in...

...those exact same positions, and there is any remember the moral theory about this. There's a really famous taught experiment by then rules the wail of ignorance, and it is couldn't stop thinking about reout the entire film. Essentially, there is a way to help people think about how they can assign, you know, fair society and adjust moral system if you will. Essentially, you place yourself behind rail of ignorance. You don't know if you will be rich or poor, black or white, healthy or ill, etc. And then you create the rules of this society and the idea is that the rules, you said, will be more fair because, as you have your own self interest in mind. You know, if you end up been able to work, say were disabled, you would like to be taking care of. And I just hand it so incredibly Aromic, because these characters are literally living inside a way of ignorant sort experiment, only that you know in this film it's real, and so many of them are still not able to create a system that in the end, could save their lives. It is interesting what you mentioning Chris About Hierarchies and society and not knowing where you are, and that is really hard to work together without knowing where you are. And the film does a bit pessimistic to me, which is probably, I guess, realistic. Then everything about things like Communism, socialism. You know, it sounds great in theory, but it doesn't work because society doesn't actually get along unless people are motivated to get up higher and achieve higher than other people are. That's deflecting a little bit from topic and getting a bit more into politics. Think it does also point out why it might be logical the way the film does end, without all the answers and without necessarily it being the happy resolution that we might be looking for when we go into watch it. That's the same time, though, I can't help thinking that by being this bleak, the film is trying to make you realize that this is really on the productive and will end up hurting you. I can I can't really think of another reason why this field would exist any presented in this way, if it wasn't trying to spark the same kind of spontaneous solidarity that certain characters are trying to spark within the film, or at least so just how terrible repercussions of not showing solidarity can be. Something else which I thought was really interesting about platform was the fact you've got all these characters who are volunteering for it. It's a bit different from a movie like Qube, where they just wake up in the room, but you've actually got to a volunteering to be an experimented change the damics a little bit. I thought that was one of the most intriguing aspects of the film. Why would somebody sign up for something like this deployment? Maybe, yeah, maybe, to get a reduced gail sentence. I found the motivations the characters be really interesting. That's really one of the things that's I would have liked to have excen explored and a bit more depth. I thought was very fast and, I think, which really distinguishes it from a lot of the other closed room mystery films that have been made of the past years. I don't think we can actually cover platform much more without getting into pretty extreme bother territory. So the last thing I will say there is that, as others pointed out earlier, it is incredible to see how Spanish cinema evolved from one thousand nine hundred and sixty to to two thousand and nineteen. You can see a really interesting tread where Spain Star Shop essentially copying other countries. The Alpha doctor role off was actually created because frank who had seen some hammer horror films and wanted to do something similar, and you can see it taking the same projectory as Italian horror films. You can see it working self into the same market and becoming rather indistinguishable in this euro horror territory. But then, once that period fades, you suddenly start seeing more interesting voices, you start seeing people, you need, directors, take core seriously as an art form and create beautiful and interesting experiences. You see them start diving more into social commentary in the see them start doing more high concept and when you compare all of the recent hits from Spain, this is such an extremely broad and diverse output, from the Toro's more subtle magical horror films to something as grotesque as wrecked, to more intriguing, well crafted films like time crimes, and then, of course, these kind of wonderful allegories as platform. So...

...it's just an incredible journey, and I think what this says about Spain the future is that it can expect some really interesting things. So Chris summarize the evolution of Spanish horror really nicely there. I think it's fascinating to consider all the guns that we've discussed and kind of look at it from the shifting perspective of the filmmakers and the political situation of the country itself and how that's had an impact on the evolution of the genre. For me, I think Spanish horror is in a great place right now. The platform was a directorial debut, so I'm really looking forward to seeing more films from that direct and there's one of a film that I just wanted to mention briefly, wonderful dark fantasy called aerimentary, the blacksmith and the devil, by Director Paul Irking Oh. This is about a blacksmith who, in prisons, dangerous demon is accidentally set free when a war from girls stumbles upon his cage, unleashing all manner of horrors. This was released in two thousand and seventeen and I'm also looking forward to seeing what else the director works on next. The set design and practical effects here are breath taken. It's a beautiful horror, captivating story. You can see the influences of Delta ro through it, but it also explores the dark humor of Alex Stiller glazier. So for me I'm really excited to see where Spanish horror continues to evolve and where it will take us in the profcoming years. I don't really have a lot else to add. I think Tom and Chris have summed it up quite well about the way that Spanish heart is presenting itself at the moment and the interesting films that we are seeing come out, and it's really great that so many films are actually becoming available on Netflix now and much more available than they would have been sixty years ago when they first came out, and maybe that's part of why they're aggressing so well. was directors and filmmakers and film warnings, as obviously all this international stuff which will have really help Spanish them to get up a sky rather than being tained for just the European market. I think in a way Spanish or films at first in the late s and early S S, carried its legacy of the other film studio. If you look at the type of or film Spain was making at the time. You see that there were a lot of films starring well, Wolfs, vampire, even monsters like Frankenstein type of monsters like, for example, in the often dcor all of also some film that took Jacqueline eyed character. So I think it's interesting to see that that first Spain tried to appropriate to itself some famous or and fantasy figures that's were used in or films before, in the S and for these in other countries. Another characteristic I would like to point out about Spanish fantasy and or cinema is that in a typical fantasy films reveal, let's say, of what the monster look like. is a crucial aspect, like a turning point in the film, like there is a before and after the review of the monster, and Spanish cinema choose not to suggest what the monster looks like. Instead, they opt for showing it right away. Chris, you mentioned about Dr All of the exposition. That was very quick, a word commonly used to describe this phenomenized fantas terror and where the goal is to create a feeling of horror by showing the monster and not just to generate anxiety by suggesting its presence. For some it was a way to say to the audience that this is what you're saying, is not a malfunction of the reality. The monster is here, is writ in front of you, is present, and which could be seen as a social commentary of what's going on in Spain at the time. To to wrap it up, yeah, I think it's senating to see how far Spanish horror has gone, going from very B B movie type of things, very poor films, two more high budgeted type of films in the s and the s with directors that went on to have an international carrier, and I can only join everyone else by saying that I can't wait to see what Spanish or cinema has to offer Nex next. Thank you very well. You have been listening to the talking images, the officially unofficial podcast of the ICM forum, which, of course, can always be founded. ICM FORCOM turns again next time and thank you for listening.

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