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Talking Images
Talking Images

Episode 18 · 1 year ago

Rewatches: Broken Hearts, New Lovers and Lying Memories

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Chris, Lauren, Sol and Tom try to decipher the power of rewatches. We will talk about:

  • How our memories can be deceitful liars
  • The films that broke our hearts
  • Stories of rags to riches
  • What actually change between each viewing
  • And so much more

You are listening to talking images, the official podcast of ICM Forumcom. Welcome back everyone, I'm Chris, and today we'll be talking about rewatches, because it's really not as simple as seeing the same film again. Seeing a film a second, a third or even a Ford or a ten time and they change your opinion and experience, and not just that. Something has fundamentally changed. Even before you press play, you now know the plot and the story. If there're twists, you see what clues you were given. If there is a tragic ending, you may see the happy moments with a clear melancholic sense of doom. Too many the second viewing is a way to focus on the filmmaking itself, to distance themselves from the story and admire the craft, perhaps get caught up in loopholes and terrible logic. For others, it is simply getting to know an old friend and getting the same great experience once again. Every viewing price an opportunity to see something new, and in the time between each viewing, your taste and perhaps even your life may have changed drastically. They may even be films which, it just weren't ready for the first time around. Be that in terms of maturity, or knowing the style or what to expect. More interestingly, the mind is an odd, odd thing and you may end up shadow boxing your previous experience, which may tends to your memory, have very little to do with the actual film but rather be a patchwork of always that durate the dreaming, which is in a collage of great life, laughs and visuals, but may not even exist. In this episode we will talk about the rewatchers that changed everything for us, try to get into the core of what the rewatch experience really gives us and talk about our own rewatch habit with midday, as always, our Palm Lauren and Saul. So let's just start with a very quick and easy question. How often do you rewatch films? Hi, this is Tom here. I don't really watch films very often, to be honest. I had a quick look through my viewing stats for the year so far and out of three hundred and sixty one films, only fourteen were re watches, and the majority of those were films that I wanted to re watch so that we could discuss them in more depth on the podcast. I've got a huge watch list of films, so I would always much prefer to delve into a film that I haven't seen instead of rewatching a film that I know I've enjoyed. I like that Chris Mentions the phrase shadow boxing your past memories and experiences, because I think he's said the nail on the head of me there. I'm always concerned that's on Rewatch, I'm not going to enjoy your film as much the second time around. This is Lauren. So when I was younger I used to rewatch films quite a bit. I could re watch films pretty much all the time, but the last few years it's been very rare. This year I've watched a hundred twenty two films and only three of them will re watches, but some years they've been close to eighty. But, like Tom I prefer to experience a new film and a new experience rather than revisiting an old one, although I do think that I should re watch more. I it's so from Australia. In terms of rewatching, I rewatched forty eight films this year, which might seem a lot, but that's out of eight hundred and ninety seven in total. So far it's turning around five percent of what I'm watching. A stuff that I've seen before. Like Tom, a number of my re watches this year have been due to the podcast. They've also been due to the challenges and other things going on on the ICM forum. Going back a few years ago, before I joined, I check movies, I was re watching one hundred to two hundred films each year. It's joining that's gone down to between forty to eighty, which I think is a good number, but I do think that I owe it to myself to be re watching more films more often. I think I'm more or less in the same box. It's all of present, though, with the completely different the trajectory. If I never actually called the home. Many film three watch every year. For reasons not related this episode, Tom Hardway the list this year and I'm up to twenty four, which I think is also about five percent of Whatt I've seen this year. However, for me that's more of an old time high because for as long as I can remember, brothers always really really focus on watching new films and getting those new experiences, and I do think I was robbing myself of a lot of great rewatch experiences leading up to that. So I know, Lauren, all are the answer the question a bit, but do you think you should be re watching more or less films? And, regardless of the answer why, I think that I should probably be rewatching more films. As you mentioned, Chris, there's a lot of films that you may watch early on in your life where you're quite not ready for them yet. For whatever...

...reason, you're not mature enough to appreciate the artistry behind them, or they don't measonate with you because they reflect on experiences that are unknown to you at that stage in your life. So when I was working through the classics when I was younger, there is quite a few films that I dismissed because they didn't resonate with me. But I imagine if I revisited them now they may grow on me. But because I'm not sure, that's why I'm kind of tentative about rewatching them. Could rather take a punt on an unknown film and revisiting some film where it may be a better experience, but I'm not quite sure about it yet. I think I should be watching more for the same sort of reasons. Is that my taste and film seems to stay mostly the same, but then I just have random changes that happened and a few years ago I did start a re watch project where I was going to rewatch all my favorite films to see if there were still my favorite films. But then whole bunch of stuff changed and now my taste and films are changed again, so I have to restart all that. Just haven't got around to it yet. But I think, depending on my mood and things that have happened, even things like reading about a film from a different perspective or a different opinion of it can just give me a new set of eyes to see a film with. So I do like to revisit them occasionally. It's just haven't done that lately, but I definitely want to. I do think I should be re watching more films, even though I seem to have rewatched the most out of everybody on the podcast tonight we're watching. I do IMPA thighs with what Thomas said about looking for a better experience with some of the classics that I might have watched earlier on when I wasn't quite ready for them, and there's always that apprehension that I'm going to dislike it again or it's going to be mediocre for me again. But I don't think it's just acclaim classics that I didn't get that I should be re watching. I think a lot of the films that I considered here my favorites, I can said of be high up there. I think I should be revisiting partly to refresh myself about what made them so great because, and they come up in conversation, the worst thing possible is going or one. I liked it but I can't remember that much about it, but also because I watch a lot of mediocre films but I've never seen and it's just really good being able to give yourself that pleasure of going back and seeing those classics that you love, was seeing those all time favorite. So it's like a bit of a more rounded film going experience rather than just watching all these new films or just sort of like mare, okay, or good, I've actually got some really good stuff and there they'll you keep your real really fresh and really enjoying the craft. And then, which Lauren said, which I also agree with you, reading up about a film can make me want to rewatch it with a different perspective. I don't often do it, but somebody posts something which is really interesting about a film that will make me really want to go back and we watch and see if I can take that same thing away from it myself. Yeah, I think I'm in the same boat as you guys in that I really think I should read a lot more, and that's also one of the things I find so weird about this podcast, because it's made me watch a lot more and maybe realize that we watching is absolutely fantastic because you can get all of these great experiences again. In many cases, has been, you know well, well, or a decade that it thought some of these films for the first time. So I almost go in blind again, which is really, really great for me, and many times my days are changed so much that I see them in such a different way. I think all of you talked about rewatching your favorite films. It's that something you do quite often. Half me just say that you re watch your very favorite film. So my current favorite film is a clockwork orange, which I talked about some one of our very first podcast episodes, and I don't actually rewatch it that often at all. Basically, I like to leave a long period between my re watches so that when I revisit films the second or even the third time, most of it has kind of faded. I'll have a recollection of the plot and what goes on, etc. But if you leave a film long enough between the Rewatch it can be like having that same incredible experience all over again. A recent example was with Barry Lyndon, which I perhaps watched about ten years ago in the cinema and it's been sitting on the shelf for about six or seven years on the Blue Ray, and I took it out and watched it a few months back and whilst I remembered most of what happened in the plot, a lot of it was completely fresh and new to me, as if I was watching it for the first time. And getting that incredible experience for a second time is something that I really relish, and that is perhaps probably reason why I don't like to re watch favorites of mine too often. I also like to leave a big gap between my watches because I like them to fade as much as possible before I go back. My favorite film is month over the COOKOO's nurse, but I don't have like a set part's been two years. I might as well re watch it now. It's just if I feel like watching it, I'll watch it. I think I've only watched that six times in the last fifteen years, but that seems to work for me and once it's faded enough that I start thinking about it again, I'll probably revisit it. Tom...

And Lauren, I've brought up some very good point about trying to let your favorite fade a bit in your mind. I don't terms of what I actually go for. I've found with video drome, which is my current number one. I've been watching that on a yearly basis for the last few years. Scream, which is also my top five, I've been watching it once a year every year, or most of my top for over its land say maybe once every one to two years, which isn't a very long time. That are often fade but was something which is really complex, like Solaris, was really good, even though only seen it maybe eighteen months beforehand, I'd already forgotten some of the details because it's a very dense film, as lot going in on there. There's some shots that I completely didn't remember at all. I do think it is good to sometimes, with some films, give them a little bit longer. I was films where there's lots going on there. I feel I can watch them quite regularly and still get a lot out of it. Also, knowing something like video drome or the scream quadrilogy quite well, it's often actually fun to go back and Rewatch it. It's got to the point where I know a lot of the dialog near Verbatim and the screen movies, but still absolutely love it because of how well it's constructed. A great the character interactions are, which I know doesn't really quite give a straight out so, and I guess I can't give a straight outswer. Some films you're like to a little bit longer, but other films I find that I can just keep watching them again and again still get a lot out of them. With me, I think it actually varies a lot from film to film. So my favorite of used to be a clockwork or and just like Tom and that's actually a case where I almost felt like every watched that too many times. I think I watched that probably five times or a four year period, and it kind of worn out. It's welcome a little bit and I still loved it, but I started seeing a lot of the things happening in it. That's very obvious. It didn't seem as intense anymore. It lost some of that power. I understood, like the rhythm, that it's the circular and at that point I was no longer as impressed by it. So that case was almost the case of just realizing that, oh, some films could that leads for me be harmed by seeing them too many times in relatively quick an session. But then my current all the varied film is last year at Marin Bob. I think that's a film we can really just rewatch over and over again, because I thought that twice in very close period, seeing it just before our previous podcast on our favorite film as well, and I'd just seen it a few months earlier. And the reason why I think that's so much fun to go back to this that there's so many interpretations and so much going on that every single time you see it is almost like a different experience and you can pick up different clues and see it in a different way. So some films just really benefit, like soul side, from seeing them many, many times in quick succession. Do you think it's possible to Rewatch a film too many times? Do all films get hurt if you rewatch them too many times, or other films you can just rewatch over and over again and still just get that exact same thrill. I feel like it is possible to Rewatch a film too many times. As you said, Christ, you appreciation for a cockweer orange, so it to gradually fade a bit after you had revisited it so many times, and studition from it is always a consume when I'm re watching a film. On the flip side of that, though, I do feel that there are some films that benefit from frequent viewings. I don't really want watch these films so much now, but perhaps in my late teens early S I'll be watching a lot of comedies, things like I can command and the American pie films, and it's kind of like almost a comfort food. You Watch them with your friends and you get to learn all the lines and you come to treasure and cherish the characters, and they are kind of films that I feel benefit moves from a re watch. I think it's definitely possible to get worn out from a film, but it actually hasn't happened to me. Most of the films that I've rewatched a lot I still really love, although when I was younger, is have a bad habit of getting obsessed with a film and just rewatch it constantly. One example was sleepwalkers, which, for some reason I watched every night before I went to sleep for like a month. I don't really know why that film helped me sleep, but couldn't stop watching it. And it's not like it was a great film, but yeah, I just like rewatching it a lot. So that was kind of a point where it was maybe I shouldn't have been watching that so much. I don't think it's possible to watch a film too many times. It's a good film, it will get Chine the stack up to Rewatch as. It probably is possible to re watch a film too many times into shorter period. I've had that with a few films before ghost world. I think I rewatched that maybe three times over six months, which was definitely way too often, and it's sort of worn out. It's appealed to me a little bit, but then I gave a little bit longer and watched it again, which was really good. Oh, I think it. It's just trying to work out with certain films I'll Laun do you give it before looking at...

...it again, but if it is a really good film, it will continue to stack up to rewatch has maybe not because it's as complex as Marian bird or Solaris. I haven't seen it recently, but I love American Pie and actual American wedding and all those films. There because of the characters, that it's great character dynamics. So it's really fun watching and saying all these characters are drawn out and the where the interact with each other. is how I feel with the ocean's trilogy, which I watch about once a year because I've got just such great interaction great characters. I don't think it's the one size fit all approach. I don't think can say that as a set amount of time that you need for each film. I think it varies per film, but I think you know, all great films or stack up for Rewatch after a certain amount of time. Kind this sword to one of the perhaps most important questions in this episode. What does the main reason that you decide to Rewatch a field? What are the causes that's drive you to pick a film? Why do you choose it the why do you want to re watch it? The main reason for me choosing to Rewatch a film will always be to share it with someone else, wherever I'm sharing it with my girlfriend or friend or family members, or showing the films that I discover it to other people and hoping that they get as much out of them that I do. As probably the main driver for me to Rewatch a film, although there is another reason as well, which is if I decide that I want to write a review about a film, I will len revisit it to make sure that I can write a good, in depth review, although sometimes there have been casion where revisited a film and intention of review in it because I remembered it as being a great film and then I've decided afterwards that perhaps it's not as good as I'd remembered it and I didn't actually go ahead with route in the review. The main reason that I'd re watch a film would be that I'm just in the mood for it, like usually it'll be a favorite film and I've just started thinking about it or seeing something sort of similar and I just want to revisit it again. I also sometimes re watch films because I'm doing assignments on them or other sort of activities like that, and the other main reason would be occasionally I'll read about a film that I didn't really lie when I'd seen it ten, fifteen years ago, and I read something that just makes me want to revisit it. When I was looking for reviews for that they shoot zombies site. I'd read about films that I didn't even like by just reading a review of someone who's really passionate about it would just make it seem like the most amazing thing in the world and I, like really want to check it out again. So other people's passion for films that I didn't like can excite me enough to go check them out again. I like how you mentioned there low in the other people's passions can ignore your curiosity for a re watch. I love it when that happens, when people give you a different stance in a film that perhaps you didn't appreciate or even disliked, and it can kind of open your mindset to thinking, hang on, they may be onto something here and perhaps giving you that little push to encourage it a rewatch. One of these films was actually Solaris, since it was brought up earlier, because when I first watched it is kind of like man, but then I read an interpretation of it straight after that was like wow, this is really interesting. I thought I was just going to wait for it to fade from my memory before checking out again, and I re watched it earlier this year. It must have been about ten years after I first watched it, and my opinion didn't change whatsoever. So I was a little bit disappointed, but sometimes it can work, and this disappointed to hear with Solaris, because that's one of the big growers for me, which is I think is something we're going to get to later on, that it's one that's definitely this a lot in my steam over the years. In terms of the topic of wild re watch a film, I'd say, like Lauren, a lot of it is mood based. It might depend on if I want to discuss it for a podcast. A lot of it would be probably mood based or based on the challenges that we have on the ICM forum. Sometimes challenges are line quite well and I can watch a film that will count for two challenges and I'm sort of like, yeah, I wouldn't mind revisiting it. Might be a good time to do so. I don't know if I've really rewatched many films over the years to share it with someone thoms. It's a big one, but I guess I'm living alone so it doesn't really affect me as much. Maybe when I was younger I might have be watched something that I might have recommended to my brother or to my parents, but it's not really a big part of it for me. A lot of its mood based and sometimes can be affective other things that are going on either in the forum or in our podcast schedule. I don't think I might mention I do occasionally rewatch a film because I raided it to Blu Ray. I want to see it looks like better in a better format, but the main thing of me would really be mood based. I really like how the PODCAST has encouraged us to re watch more as a group and it opens up a great world of possibilities when you all watch a film in a short period of time and have the opportunity to discuss it and listen to other people's different interpretations, and it really adds a new dimension to the film watching experience when you get to share that with other people. Also said they love the total element in all of year. That's just such a wonderful way to share a love of cinema. But in your...

...personal preferences, do you prefer rewatching your own favorite or re watching films that do feel you misjudged? I think that I would always favor be watching my old favorite over a film that I may have misjudged, because I know we've all favorites that I'm going to have a good time, or when it's a film that may have misjudged as that kind of gray area where, okay, it's meant to be an excellent film, it didn't resonate with me the first time round it might still not the second time. So I'm always a bit hesitant because when I pick a film, it is because I want to get some enjoyment out of it. Watching films is a relaxing hobby for me and I always want to enjoy my experiences. So we'll try and plump for film that I know I'm going to enjoy. When I'm choosing a Rewatch, I'll definitely choose an old favorite over something that I think I misjudged, although I like revisiting. Both of those same reason as that, as concert with something that I loved once, I'm probably going to love it again. That was something that I didn't like. That's probably going to be the same response the second time and unless I feel like I've significantly changed to appreciate it in a certain way or I need to rewatch it for some reason, then I'm probably always going to choose a favorite. This is interesting. I think I might differ a bit from Lauren and Tom. I do have some favorites that I've already talked about that I do watch on a yearly basis, and then I love three watch. I like the fact that the horror change is coming along and can get back into the scream quadrilogy. I'd say in general I'd prefer to re watch films that I think I might have misjudged. If I'm watching a film that's maybe not an all time favorite but it's one more rated, maybe eight out of ten or higher, and I sit down to rewatch it, it comes with a whole lot of expectations and I find a lot of them end up being either disappointments or the films that I liked a lot and I expected a like more the second or third time round and I just didn't. If it's something which I dislike the first time around or I thought was mediocre, this sort of more room for it to move up in my esteem, whereas I might use the example of come and see, which I rewatch just this morning. I watched it and I liked it about the same that I did the first time round. A couple of reservations, still quite powerful. But you know, I'm looking at it compared to my other favorites and like I reactions about the same. And then I've got some like Stalker, which are also re watched this week, which was a bit of a disappointment, and again a film that I already quite highly up. It's much more exciting for me if I'm watching something which I guy maybe early a four or five or six out of ten too, because I got all these possibilities for the climb up higher the sky still limit, whereas if it's something around really highly that's a great chance of going backwards in my esteem. I actually feel exactly the same way salt. The idea of rewatching some of my favorites can almost feel a little bit daunting. You know, I really want to have the right mood set and I really don't want, you know, a film I've dearly loved for a long time to fall my estimation. That's almost a little bit of a threat, so it can be a little bit of a scary exercise. And on the topic of films, that I just didn't care for it much the first time and I feel a mis judged if, for some reason I would get that idea that I say verily misjudged a film. Perhaps I didn't give it attention, it to serve or perhaps I picked up some angle to get into that film that makes it seem more appealing. I might didn't. Haven't urge to go back there. I mean it's often happens, for instance, if I watch more films by the same director, for instance, and I really love some of those films and I started thinking like, why didn't I get that reaction to this film I watched five or ten or even more years ago? was I just not in the right mood for it? Then? I would really really want to put that down because it sounds a bit extremely they don't want to done it and injustice, essentially, because if I love the man of two films, it feels like, okay, now I really need to go back and rewatch that film, reworsh those two three films, because those are that directors, more of recognized films and here I am loving some of their lesser ro I had a similar reaction to Chris with the directors and thinking particularly of hero shot a Shikahara and woman of the Junes, and I watched it the first time around I was thought that was a great film, but on a masterpiece. And then in the interim I watched the face of another which I absolutely loved, and pit for, which is another extremely good film, and I thought I'll go back and give woman of the Junes and other chants, and it's now my all time top fifty. That's one that maybe I did misjudge a little bit, and watching some of the directors other films the first time really helped cement in to me what I liked in those films and what I could then see in the directors most acclaimed film. And tying into both of those experiences, both experience of seeing something you perhaps didn't like them as the first time but then got elevated and suddenly became a favorite or suddenly found much better ritually thought, and the much less nice version we see something you quite enjoy it. This falls rustically.

What this is the biggest factor in changing your opinion of a film. It's perhaps the evolution of my appreciation for cinema as an art form as opposed to it just being an experience. When I was younger and I was working through the IMDB top to fifty, a lot of the films that I didn't enjoy, the ones that didn't necessarily early have a big wow factor, perhaps a big twist or something that really grabbed me more if the subtle films that perhaps have eight artistry and cinematography, more subtle stories, didn't really have a profound impact on me. I'm thinking of films like Hitchcock films and notorious and Rebecca. They didn't sit well with me and I feel like I need to go back and me visit them, and that because I don't really watch many films as it is, I can't really recall any occasions where I've been too harsh on a film the first time round. It doesn't really seem to be a reason for falls and rises with things that I like wouldn't like. For some of them it's definitely experience, or what life experience, but generally I actually don't know. It can be completely random. I'll just revisit a film randomly and I love it I'll hate it and I have no idea why. There's a couple things, like overly sentimental music is something that really greats on me now, but when I was younger I could generally ignore it, but now, as soon as it happens, I actually just can't deal with it. So that's definitely a thing that's taken away from so all my old favorite films, especially films which are really bad for that. I think the number one thing for me which always dangers my mind about a film is expectations. I've had a large number of films that I've entered into with really high expectations that have ended up disappointing and then when I've rewatched it like so without so much buzz around, I come to like it more. And the same thing around. There are films I've entered with super low expectations and I was like well, this is actually really decent film. Then when I've gone to a watch and I'm like no, it's actually not as good as I thought it was. I taste has evolved and has changed better over the years, but they are number one factor for me, as always, the expectations and I go in and sit down to watch the film. That's so interesting soul, because I don't really think expectation as that big an impact on my end evaluation of a film. It will probably affect it in some way. It will certainly affect how I view how I feel about the film. For instance, if I find the film to be great, that might be a terrible disappointment. If it's, you know, I'm really raved a film from one of my favorite directors which I might have expected to put down in my top five or top ten of the year and then it's just a great film, then it can be a horrible disappointment. But if it's film I have almost no previous expectations to prampt that negative expectations do, that might be a very uplifting experience. I think expectations changed how I view them, but it doesn't necessarily change how I feel about them. I think for me there are two things that really changes how I experienced a film. The first one is really just how my taste has changed, maybe how my experiences have changed my taste, where I, as Tom Probably view films a little bit differently than I first got into see them, when I'm perhaps more focused on, you know, simply the craft or simply the story, and now I might be looking at things a lot more in terms of the art of it. And second would be just how familiar I am at the material. So obviously something really really impressed me early on simply cannot impress me as much today because, you know, I've seen ten, twenty, thirty, forty plus films, maybe hundreds of films doing very similar things, so they won't be as striking. And lastly, and this is also the one of the main reasons why I will go to Rewatch the film, is if I somehow have gotten a better sense of what a film is trying to do, because I think that it helps to have a certain degree of knowledge or understanding, even just as a visual reaction, to how you're meant to engage with that film. Just to give a quick example of this, it's a bit like how, if you watch a horror movie or a comedy, you have very different expectations to how you're going to enjoy and experience that film and you've been watching them a little bit different you'll be reacting to dialogs and performance as a little bit differently. But I think a lot of films, especially a lot of more artistic films aren't as familiar. You don't know the rule book already. Usually this is a very natural thing, which I talked about earlier, that you know I see more by the same director and certainly they might be just this one thing that clicked to you. A very specific example. I only used to love very specific Eric Romer films, but after seeing several of them, including some rewatchers, as suddenly started getting his humor, and then I was also reading more about them and seeing how, for instance, he used to make every single...

...film as an antithesis, essentially pick out something he believed in and then try to find the best argument against it and do this film sets of debate. That was not a great entry way and suddenly I was seeing these films in a very different light. So I had both more visual entry way into this work where I, you know, wasn't enjoying his humor more because it was understanding it. I was seeing it a very specific way, and then they also had the additional knowledge which I could bring to it and which made the films come alive in a way they hadn't before. This also made me rewatch several of the films and we got the great two bar podcast on his communism proverb cycle as well. So I really think that is finding that enter it. Understanding a bit more what someone is going for can really really change how you experience the film. And mostly disagree with that. But how do you have one example was when I first watched for at I thought it was all scripted and so I was just kind of like but then I found out that it was actually real reactions and then it was really funny because it was completely different knowing that it was real. But generally, things like artistic understanding of the director of whatever I like. Don't care about the director at all and I don't really feel that consistency within any work from any director. So that kind of stuff doesn't really affect me now that this expectation really but I do agree that sometimes knowing something about the film or what it's trying to do on a rewatch can change your opinion of the film. I think a film and sometimes being hatched, I knowing a bit more about it when I could use for my own life. Is for St Gump, and I first watched that I didn't realize how much of it was I kind of footage that Tom Hanks had been spliced into out. Of course, re watching it slightly older and realizing all that, it actually makes you realize how clever a lot of it was. This is a very interesting topic and one film I'd like to bring off is the cabin in the woods, film that flaunce the horror conventions and is all the better for it. And it is a film that I really enjoyed on first viewing enough that I wanted to rewatch it, and the second experience it was just as good as the first. I think that was because there was the anticipation of what was coming that kind of kept me engaged and interested. So I think it's great that some films first viewing there's this surprise element that makes it work for you, but then on the second viewing, because you've looked it so much, it can be the anticipation of what is about to come that makes you love it so much. That's a great comment and I actually go to what they're building up a little bit to here, which is the films that jumped the more through or that felt the hardest. So perhaps the can talk a little bit about a few films that you just thought what good about, even disliked, but ended up absolutely loving. This is quite a struggle for me, as I don't really rewatch many films that disappoint me on the first watch. One example, though, is stalk. Although I didn't think was a great film, on second viewing appreciate it far more than the first time I watched it. The first time I watched it was when I was working through the IMDB top to fifty. I was quite young at that time and I think a lot of it went to my head. There's a lot of philosophical conversations and, frankly, I was quite bored of it. The second time around it didn't blow me away, but I could appreciate the philosophical angle a lot more and also the color schemes and the kind of beauty and wonder of the film. It will never be a personal favorite, but that we watch did make me appreciate it a bit more, and they need to add as well. The driving force behind the rewatch of Stalker was because I read the novel. The film actually follow the story of the novel very closely, but it was through reading it and getting a grasp of the author's ideas that made me want to rewatch it and improve my appreciation of the film. Like I said earlier, I don't often re watch films that I didn't like, but there are few that I've given another chance. So there are a couple that I rewatched for Uni to do assignments on. One of those was Hiroshima One and more, which I hated the first time I watched it, but the second time I watched it I had had a traumatic experience Oriens, and so when I re watched it it was like it just connected with me in all those ways because it got them so right. But the first time I watched it I didn't see that. I saw like a really rubbish love story, stupid arty, farty film, and then the second time it just worked really well and now it's a favorite of mine. And then, on my own back, two films that I hated when I first started getting into film when I was about fourteen, were Casablanca and before sunset, and both of them I gave about a two out of ten. I just thought they were like total trash. But I hadn't realized that before sunset was a sequel. So years later I watched before sunrise and then before sunset all of a sudden it went to a favorite so I think, and...

...jumped from like a two to an eight. And the same thing happened with Casablanca. I don't even know what happened with Casablanca. I couldn't remember what I disliked about it, but again it jumped to an eighth, from a to it just all worked that time around. And another film was a Speria, the original one, not the terrible remake. For the first time I watched it I just really didn't like it. It was, I really low budget and amateurish and it just was just dumb. But then I kept thinking about it and I kept I kept dreaming about it, the soundtrack and like the visuals, and then when I re watched it a few years later, again it just, yeah, it all came together and worked really well. But those are the biggest jumps for me that have gone from like I did not like this film or ever want to see it again, to being a favorite. I have had some films which I disliked or I thought were mediocre which had now become favorite, but none of them have done it over a single repeat viewing. The example I want to use here is Solaris which, as I mentioned before, we watch this week I've now seen it seven times. First Time around I saw it had very high expectations. It was compared to two thousand and one, a space odyssey, and when I first watched it would have been maybe sixteen, seventeen years ago. That comparison, of course you're going to go with mega high expectations and was almost an inevitable disappointment for me. But something kept drawing me back and I watched it again a few years later. I liked it a bit more but some reservations. Watched it again a couple of years after that. I've just kept rewatching it and it's now got to the point where Solaris a film that I originally voted five out a ten fraud IMDB, is now in my all time top three greatest films I think I've ever watched. I think it's just a such a dynamic movie and I finished three watching it this week. I wanted to go back to the beginning and watch all again because there's so many different elements in there. I think all that was expectations for me and it's kind of interesting. Stalker, which Tom Mention, is sort of the opposite for me. I love that the first time round I loved or the philosophical elements of it, and when I went back to watch at the second time it was a lot less atmospheric than I remembered. Had really great ideas there and that's what stood up in my mind. Everything took a lot longer to work out and actually I think takes you know and our for them to even get to the zone. And then I re watched it this week and it fell a bit further than my esteem. But I know what my talking about. fallers at the moment talk about films that have risen, although I didn't hate it the first time round. I might give the example the social network, and that first came out in cinemas. I saw it and I was like, Oh, yes, it is a good film, to sold film. I don't know why everybody's thinking it should win best picture at the Oscars. And it was only when I rewatched it, after all the hype, after it lost best picture of the King's speech, I was able to give it a of expectations and to the point where I think, after three of Yous, it's my top five films for the year. And, like Lauren said, with Causa blancap I first watched cauza bland. I thought, yes, is a great film. I don't think it's a second best film ever made, because I think that point I was referencing the afi of a hundred films of all time. When I've come to revisitor the years of the yet actually has a very solid film. It's not all time top too, but it is really good and behold expectations in the tempered expectations I'm going to play there. I've actually had several films that changed really drastically, and many of those this year when I decided to do a Robert Presson rewatch Malda. That was an absolutely incredible experience because I thought these films that completely different light, and I'm not sure why or what exactly changed. I know how I felt about them the first time. I thought they were very lowesome. I really hated that look in many of his characters eyes. I hate that a lot of the minimalism that he put into the world that just felt a little bit too rough. It stopped me from engaging with the films in the way he probably wanted me to. Perhaps the main thing that changes that I watched this quite early and that I now don't care as much for say, characters or drama and I care more about the craft itself and I had a little bit more understanding of how we searched the back, though I don't really think that shape the experiences that much. I think the first one I re watched was lunchlot to lock, which I almost thought was comical the first time. It was made almost the same time and as multipythons in the holy grail and you know the first scene when the riding on the horses. First Time I saw it I almost felt like it was, you know, it seen a the multipython, because it didn't look great and at that time I just loved the visuals. The visuals were so important to me, and this film it's almost felt ugly because he's just so broke it down, so mechanic and so stripped bare. But this time not care as much about the visual aspect, being more pulled into the minimalism. I just really enjoyed how he made a knight into thin boxes and...

...the way it clungs and clings the battle scenes. I think that just had a very different impact on me. Where the first time just couldn't get involved, this time I was really fastneted, just completely immersed and that went from a five to a nine for me. And then I also thought or large, and which I had also given a very low rating, to an also hand caredful and that's a much more human film. This is about power of money and how it corrupts. It has some lead characters that go on a dirt that could be very, very emotional, and first time I couldn't connect it because I couldn't connect with the character. It was again sols repaired, were these statues, but this time was focusing more on the actual cycle was actually happening in the way he presented it, and once again I was completely immersed, including not extremely efficient way he shoots violence. He doesn't even show any of it. There's one scene where a father slaps his daughter and instead of showing the slab, it shows her holding a Coffee Cup and you see it's billy and it says this very efficient minimalism that really, really, really worked and Rewatch it. It believes six present films, some of which are like, some of which I didn't like, and just all of them meant so much more to me this time around. So I think this is one of those times when my taste are changed so much that is completely got caught up in a style that I hadn't before, and rest was also all those directors which I had felt that way about a long time. I thought this was something I would really have loved. Why didn't I love it? I should go back, and in this case I was proven completely correct. In many other cases, like I rewatched by peer, by Draya at least twice, I think, and the out of him that it didn't grow from the same with the wigankles are, though, sometimes it's just exactly the same experience all the time. You can all have been blown away. So we've all built up a lot of their vibes here. So let's just destroy all of that positive energy and focus on the tragedy of losing a loved one. Do we all have those films that we loved but we watched and ended up following from grace, falling in restimation and leaving US morning their last I haven't had an occasion where there's a film that I've loved that's completely fallen from grace. The most obvious one of feed for me would be wait until dark. I absolutely loved it. Unfair for you and it's such a tense film, but on repeat viewing I was able to take myself out of it and kind of think about the logic behind it and the plot holes in the film. I remember reading one review online saying that the plot holes are big enough that already had been buying character could probably see them, and I think that's brilliant. It is a shame that the film didn't hold up as well on pepe and I still enjoy it for what it is. It's a very tense experience, but going back to it made me realize that there are a lot of holes in the logic there. And just to clarify, it was a nine out of ten originally and I think on repeat view and it went down to a second out of time. Yeah, I've had a few favorites not quite live up to the same amount out of love, but only drop a little bit. There's only been maybe two favorites that dropped completely out of that. The first one was Amilie, which I first watched when I think I was fifteen, and I gave it like a ten out of ten, but I rewatched a few years ago and I barely liked it. It was just gross and that's now a five out of ten, and that's me being really generous. The other one is the graduate, which was another ten out of ten that I gave when I was about fourteen and fifteen, but every time I rewatch it it's just less and less funny, to the point that now it's just really dumb and boring, and that one's sort of barely a six. Those are probably the only two top, top favorites that I don't want to go near again. I'm pretty sure in terms of films that I've dropped to my esteem, I think the biggest one is probably chariots of fire. When I first watched chariots of fire I had very low expectations. I kept reading about it being one of the weakest best picture winners ever, and you know that it should have never one. You know reads by Warren Beaty should have won instead, and all that stuff going on. So I entered into it expecting it to be a very lousy film and I was impressed with how generally well done it was, technically ill well acted it was, and I found it really involving. Of course, you've got the very iconic music school for the running. Anyway, I went back a number of years afterwards and I re watched it and I could not even believe what I saw the first time around. I thought, wow, a lot of this is just really cheap. Melo, the drama, you've got a couple of really poorly developed love interest from the make characters and I just couldn't get my head around how much I liked the first time around and I went into watch the second time. It...

...was number one in my list of films from Nineteen and eighty one. After watching it completely fell out of my top ten films from nine hundred and eighty one, but that would have been the biggest drop for me. So I don't actually have a drop that went from a favorite to a dislike or to a middling film, but they have had one drop in particular that went from being one of my very favorite films potentially a candidate for, you know, my top twenty five of all time, which just got up, really decimated to the point that, you know, it's not the evening my top ten twenty or thirty of the eight was released in and that is unfortunately so the Arias, and even worse, it was a Sydom of you, not the Wan, to put also down to the film itself, because it's the first five minutes ago. was projected without sounds, so it was already bad stock. But this is one of those cases where a lot of the things I just completely loved the first time disappeared. For me, one of the things I was really fascinated by, I know it's a comic critique, is the car scene where it's slowly fades from color to black and white as the car drives in this futuristic city which is really just, I vertical correctly, Tokyo. The first time I was really immersed in it. I was really caught up in just a movement and just general impression. The second in time, I think I just went yet this is regular city and the magic was completely gone. For me. It was more or less a de mystification. It's still a great film. It's still beautiful in so many ways, especially something that the scenes up in the space station, many of the special effects, the actual mystery, but it just didn't hit as hard and it was definitely a case of shadowboxing. So it might be that if I watched it again it will increase back up, but it was one of those cases where, you know, I had so much love for it already that you know I would be looking at even as the visuals, for instance. One seems like this is not as well composed as I originally thought and it will be just hurt by my previous experience. So again, like I said, this may change in the future, but that really was the most extreme drop for me because it was the film I loved so darely. It was just so extremely demistified. That's really interesting to hear, Chris, because one of the things that I just liked about Slaura so much the first couple of times around was that car same I thought, ah, this is just going on for way too long. It's got nothing to do with the plot. Wise it in there. More and more than I've we watched the film, the more and more I've loved that seen, especially when it gets to the end night in the see like all the lights from the NEON signs glimming around. Yeah, I'm just thinking it really adds to the whole mood of it and I just love the whole pacing of the film and how tough off ski does not make it a thriller, is more interested and being more meditative and about the experience itself. Yeah, no, I'm sorry here that it is interesting cause I watch STOK ORSO recentally. It's got a similar scene with a sort of like going intowards the zone. It goes from that Brown and white intercolor as that seems to be something that took hobskol its quite a bit. Yeah, that's true, and I didn't love that theme from Dccer, which I also really watched quite recently. But that's quite interesting as well, and I love the fact that our impression of that car scene got completely flipped on rewatch. So, whining down the conversation a little bit, I would also like to ask at a bit footballus question, which is what is the shortest time between watching a film for the first time? I've watching it for instance. Have you ever watched a film twice in the cinema, and has this ever changed your opinion of the film? I've actually got a great example for this, Chris. Perhaps one of the only times I can recall where I've gone out to my way to watch a film twice in the cinema, and this was for gravity. So the first time I watched it it was just in a standard cinema and I was so immersing it. It was an incredible experience. I absolutely love the film. That's such a for several film and it really conjures up wealth of emotions as you go through this roller coaster ride, and it was so brilliantly shot. It looked amazing. The score was incredible to because I enjoyed it so much, I rewatched it perhaps a week or two later, but this time I re watched it on an Imax screen to make sure that I could get the most out the experience. It actually improved because I was able to appreciate it on bigger screen, even better sound. Probably the only time I can remember where I've been to rewatch a film in cinemas, but I was so glad that I did. I did see a couple films multiple times at the cinema. First one was secret window because I just really enjoyed it. I was thirteen at the time and I went back a couple days later to watch it again. I also saw stalled three times in cinema, but that was over a period of a few months and I saw it right first, then monster first, and then I went to a Qa where I got the hat in the film, but the actual shortest time I've gone between re watching a film, if this counts, is I watched from dust...

...till dawn with the commentary, and excited me so much that immediately would then watch the film. I mean it's my favorite horror film of all time. But yeah, the commentary just like got me go and I just had to rewatch it instantly. I love that you watch from dust still down with the commentary and that's now encourage me to revisit it and watch with the commentary. I do love listening to film commentaries and warning particular that really struck a chord with me was for sunshine because it was done by it to Danny Boyle and professor brain cocks and they were analyzing the science behind the film. And rewatch from that perspective does add so much to the film. You get the background of how it was made and some interesting facts and stuff and it can in hand which you appreciation of a good film. Yeah, the from USTA door one is Quen Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez. They're just very good conversationalist and they're very exciting to listen to it, especially Tarantino is a few yeah, little behind the scenes tidbits and things like that. But just as in Tarantino talked about his filmmaking decisions or writing decisions. Is Not to get me excide of over that. I don't really listen to commentaries all that often. It only really be if a film fascinates me a lot. Even then I never usually watch the commentary the whole way through. I think the most reeks of film I could think of where I listened to the commentary the whole way through was heartless by, for thei prudy Jim sturges, which is incredibly dynamic film, and just listening to the commentary as I was watching it again it was just mind blowing. And then when I re watched the film some months later, it jumped all the way upon to my wartime top a hundreds. So so really great film that did really benefit from the commentary. Getting onto the question at hand, I think the only film that I've watched twice in cinemas was Munich, even Spielberg Film. When I first saw it it was at ad that screening of it, and remember I drive to the cinema myself. I was really excited that it was playing in like December rather than early January and yeah, I thought it was a very good film and then I was telling one of my friends about it and he was so disappointed that I didn't wait to see it with him and I was like, I didn't realize I wanted to see it that much, just like Oh, yeah, of course I do. Ended up saying it again with him, which actually was really good. I did get more out of it and I do think it is one of US Spielberg's most dynamic films. Incredibly good music by John Williams and very different sort of music score other than me and I kind of thing. I've seen any films twice in cinema. There are some we have had maybe two months in between, like I saw the triplets of Bilbow. I love you. I pronounce that Hi. It seems someone called the French pronunciation police, so I'm here to tell you that it's pronounced the triplets of Billie. Thank you for your time. I saw the triplets of Billie in cinema and then I saw it a couple months later on DVD, because it actually got released on David feel some of the time to when it came out in cinemas, and I was actually one. We're actually want to show that off to other people. And so what a great film this is. But yeah, generally I would usually give it a year between films. I want to usually watch it with any like a month or a few weeks in between. When Tom was talking about being right back to gravity, I hate came to remember with have the menace rich. Both viewings were not my choice. So friends my Molda a star wars marathon and the Pi re watched it and then very briefly after, I don't remember. I think it might have been a month or do or read to be fair, but the phantom menace was released in three D for the very first time and a lot of my friends really want to go with those. Also going to be a social thing. That went as well at the Phantom and is obviously the worst star wars film, and it's not the particularly good film either, but I got to see that first on the small screed and them of the big sweet entreaty. And by the way, I'm not the big fan of Three D. two things you do for friends, as appost a much more pleasant one, which was when I was much younger, think I was a teenager, was that I really watch the rest of our dogs twice in a row, first on the TV by myself and then when it was God the next day, with my father, which was a great experience because, unlike fundamn is, I quite like rest of our dogs. But there was one, just a couple of months ago actually, where it was my specific choice. It was not triggered by any kind of social events and they were literally back to back. And this is one of those rare cases where instantly felt that I had missed something about the film, which was to Lucy and Pintilly film. Why are the bells ringing? METICA, also known as CARNIVAL SCENES? I'm not sure if all of you have seen it, but it is a very hectic film, and it would later films of fatility and are also extremely, extremely hectic in general. So it's just this sensory overload of so many characters and so much dialog and so many yoke that it's so easy to get lost in it. It ended up...

...on the seven. I liked it, but I didn't love it. Luckily, though, I had one of the CIF lined up, Balumta or the OH, which was his next film, and while in love that, I found it great, just as the film just so high energy, so much happening. I really focused in their realized their amount off focus. I had to give one of his films and I got so much pleasure out of this focusing on all the details and trying to fall who each person walk and what was happening, that I actually went back the very same day. I saw the yoke put on carnival scenes. Absolutely loved it. It's just such, like I said earlier, high endgy film. But it's just when I actually absorbed, when I could actually give it by full attention and by the way, I was still struggling a little bit to realize who every single one of this endless character gallery was. It was so fascinating and fun me. And it's just such a big film with so much happening. It's really doesn't take you just cannot take your eyes away from because if you take your eyes away from it for just like a couple of seconds, something might be lost. So I think that was the big one. That's one word actually changed completely for me again because it went from a seven hundred and twenty nine they became my favorite. So that was a very lucky rewatch. I feel sorry for you, Chris. That you're re watching the cinemas. Was Film is awefullest of Phantom Menace. I can remember when I saw it in the cinemas and responsively disappointed, being a huge fan of the original trilogy, and I can't imagine what it was to be like being forced into watching it twice. Well, luckily it's it's over and it's many years ago out. So to take us to our very last question, but also while moves in for you, because this really is perhaps the most point of question in this conversation, what are the key differences between re watching a film and seeing it for the very first time? When I'm watching film for the first time, I find it very easy to get lost in the moment, particularly if it's a film that I'm enjoying. I'll just sit back and be immersed in this world the film everyone involved created, and absolutely love that feeling, but sometimes it can make me overlook aspects of the film that are perhaps lacking in certain areas. Now, when I rewatch a film, because I know what's going to happen, I tend to spend more time analyze in the film, perhaps looking at any foreshadowing it's in there, and also analyzing the hints it perhaps if there's a twist in the plot, hints at that or any clues that it left there in the script and dialog and just seeing how clever and how thoughtful of director in the script right of being in preparing their film, whether it all ties together it nicely. So this means that I can sometimes appreciate the subtle nuances on it. I can viewing perhaps in the performances, the camera work, word aspects of the filmmaking, but you can also come to realize the aspects of the film aren't particularly remarkable on a second viewing, and that is perhaps one of the key reasons for me and why I don't want to rewatch a film, because there is a tendency for me to over analyze it, pick holes in it and not enjoying it much I did the first time round. Yeah, I feel similar to Tom I generally like if a film grabs me, then I let it take me away into its world and do its thing. And on a re watch I guess I have the expectation that it's going to do the same thing, but I will start to look around just the plot, because I'm more plot and character oriented than the artistry or the filmmaking. But I do like to look at how the film has been constructed to give me this experience. So I on the Rewatch I'll be trying to pay more attention to that or think about why it connected with me a certain way on the first time, whereas I like the first viewing to be as blind as possible. Generally I know just the one to two sentence plot summary, maybe the genre, and that's about all I like to know. But on the second viewing I go in with maybe I've read other reviews, I've read other interpretations, I've thought about the film myself. So it comes loaded with all this other stuff and I can't go into it quite as blind. But I still feel that generally I won't pick up on the floors for a film that I love until it's been a few re watches. Like I usually won't pick it up on the second time. It's usually the third time that's when there like little niggly things will start to be like really annoying, like jokes that weren't very funny the first time, on the third time they'll actually hurt me. And if, yeah, there's an annoying sentimental music by the third viewing, I've had enough of it. Yeah, that's the biggest difference to me. I think a lot of it depends on the type of film and how long you've left between viewings as to how watching it for a second time affects you. I am now in the position where I can watch films that I haven't seen for seventeen or eighteen years. They could be acclaimed classics.

It will be like revisit a faded dream or like faded memories or the past. I can be nice in that sort of way. If it is a favorite or it is something that I've seen more recently than a lot of it's going back and trying to find a different clues that connect things up together acually. If it's a mystery, fil wards looking for like all the small, subtle details. The great one is in scream to there's a sign in the dormitory which craved sort of cuts off and it's going to say no eating in the living room. At the way that it's cut off it says no living. There's a lot of really fun, really small techniques like that which, with all time favorites, you do pick up on the subsequent viewings. I think with other films we have left at of a while before going back. It's like try to like revisit that great dream that you've had in you forgotten and try like well in all those blanks once again. Yeah, I think you're completely right there. Thought in that how long it's been since you washed it and most remember from it changes everything, because if it is a film you love, you will be shadow boxing that and like with me, and so they are, is that will haud that film. But there are films I really much have completely forgotten, boule quillerist, how it ends, for who ends up alive, or any kind of massive plot elements. And sometimes that's great, like I remember rewatching a couple of could art movies for one of our previous podcasts now and I like the essentially awesome exactly the same as the first time, but as gotten almost everything about them. So I think it's really interesting how that works. So sometimes you shadowboxing, sometimes you're having almost at first time viewing experience again. Oh and one more thing in this will annoy palm a little bit because he's the film pure is, but on re watches I actually become a film purest. On first time youings I want necessarily see them in one viewing. My attention maybe elsewhere, and it's quite likely I won't have tried to do not facilitate this in the experience. But if I take the time to actually rewatch a film, I will make sure that there's no distraction, that I get to see it in one viewing and that all of my focus is on that film. So that has nothing to do with the real question of what fundamentally changes with the film itself, but it's certainly a massive change in how I view that film. I think I'm kind of the opposite. I think I'm more likely to audding task and not properly focus on a film second time around or third time around. If I've already seen it, I sort of know what's going to happen. There's the first time around, I sort of don't know what the more talkie bits of it are, so I don't know when would be a good time to Auso, don't know when would be a good time to eat a meal while watching it, whereas if I've seen the film before, I sort of more of an idea about the parts of it where I might not need to pay as much attention. Yeah, I'm the same that the first viewing is like a hundred percent focus and then rewatch, especially if it was just, you know, having a good time of the favorite, my purism goes down a little bit. And I might just say that misremembering a film is one of my favorite parts of it, because that the closest you get to being able to experience it again for the first time. If you've confused one another film, if memories have blurred together, if you can't remember who the killer is, we can remember, we can't remember our exactly at all played out. That's so fust as she actually gets home that pure experience again. So I love it when I misremember a film and fortunately my memories a little bit too good for that to happen that often at this point in my life. That actually made me think of a bit fer the question. Have you ever misremember that film in sensity teach someone else, for instance, is the killer, or that you know you completely transplanted the plot elements from all the movie so that you're suddenly shocked? Is essentially not just the first time viewing, but it's a complete inversion of all of your expectation. I don't think that's happened to me, but that would be such a great, great experience. I didn't think that's happened to me, but that a game would be an excellent experience. One thing that your conversation is reminded me of there is there was a time, maybe about out ten years or so ago, when I watched the last circus and I was incredibly drunk at the time that I watched it, so much so that I basically forgot everything that happened in the second part of the film. I woke up the next day thinking that I really, really enjoyed the film, but I couldn't for the life of me remember what happened. So I did actually watch it the next day and luckily I enjoyed as much the second time. But that's quite a rare occasion for me. I just thought, as we have mentioned it, I've never really misremembered any important parts of the film, but I did just remember that I watched the abyss when I was a kid and I could have sworn that they were anglerfish in that film and I re watched it specifically because I wanted to see the Angler fish again. And they want in there and I don't know where I got that from. So I don't know if I made that up or I dreamt it or was in another film, but I've never been able to find these...

...damn anglerfish, so that made me pretty sad. I've had some interesting things with a misremembering because of directors cuts and had it with a manator to the first time I ever saw it was the James Camera and you know fin or cut of it, whatever he wants to call it, and then I remember rewatching it and you suddenly don't have the parts about terminated, being a good father and all these other things, and I'm like we did, I misremember that was it there? And then I'm watched, I think, on a DVD release afterwards, and sudden the stuff was back in there. I'll realize that I saw an Alterni out of the film. Can't think of a specific time and I have misremembered who the killer is. Sometimes I've misremembered certain parts. So like in north by northwest, I didn't quite remember all the twist and turns in there with Jathon and now, which I re watched recently, I remembered who the killer was but I couldn't quite remember why or how, and how all different parts of bits and pieces filled together. So just lovely saying that play out again. You know, I knew who the killer was that time. Yeah, it really is one of the best things about rewatching when you've forgotten, really get that experience one more time with trying to figure everything out. And it's also interesting if you remember one or two key scenes and then you try to figure out how they fit in and how they got there, you would most likely not have a single clue. I'm not one of those people who get really focused on the story, at least anymore. Think I've distanced myself a little bit from that. Even on the first time viewing I might pick up some of those errors, but obviously the more time you see a films, the more focus to become on all those things in the more glitches and errors anything else that might be bothers some will come up, but that is obviously quite frustrating as well. Don't to me. This also a fascinating question of the rewatch where you do see a film for the second time, at the same time it is the very first time, that is your first Rewatch, that you see that film knowing what will happen. You know, unless you actually forgotten, like we talked about. But there's this idea that this is the very first time you can actually piece together everything in the puzzle and see if they were clues or see how everything moves, to watch the end. Then you know. I think that's a really fascinating idea of that very, very first rewatch. I guess, if we wanted to be philosophical, every viewing of a film is a first time viewing because you're never able to mimic or completely replicate the conditions that you watch the film in to begin off with. That could be whether you're seeing in the cinema versus DVD, you're seeing it knowing what happened beforehand or not knowing what happened beforehand. It's always going to be a completely different experience and everything that's happened to you in the meantime will shape the way that you perceive it. And the guest example that I could think of that in a film is in twelve monkeys, where Bruce Willis Madeline stow go into the cinema and they rewatch vertigo and they comment that the same film, but you know it seems different. The film hasn't shows it's a static object at everything that's happened to us in the meantime, everything that we know going into it automatically changes our perceptions. And with that beautifully practic note, I think our episode unrey watches has come to the end. Thank you for listening and I hope you will really listen to this episode again and again and again, and doing this again and again and again, you have been listening to talking images. Official PODCAS OF ICM FORUMCOM.

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