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Episode 35 · 2 months ago

Interview with Adam Torel, Head of Third Window Films

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we sit down with independent Japanese cinema producer and distributor Adam Torel, the Head of Third Window Films, to hear about his upcoming films, his work with Shinya Tsukamoto and Sion Sono, and what it takes to get people to watch independent cinema in Japan. The answer to the latter in particular may both shock and entice you.

You are listening to talking evictionthe FICIAL PODCAST OF IM FOR COM, welcome back every one, I'm Chris, andas always, I'm doing by Saul. I am so from Australia and Tom. I come fromEngland, and then this episode they have a bit of a treat for you. We'rejoined by Adam throughout the head of third window films to talk about theirupcoming releases, film distribution and their impact on from temporaryAsian cinema and, at the end, will have a bit the fact Cuminat with questionsfrom her listeners, but before all of that welcome at them so happy to haveher. Thank you for having m several of our listeners likely have a few thirdwindow films on their selves already at least the one in the UK or like soul inAustralia. They may even have some feelings on theirselves without evenrealizing. So why don't? You start with a bit of a sales pitch what is towindow films and why the people pay attention to your releases? Well, thewhole point of third window films. Actually I started off distributionworking for Tartan films, which peoples all a certain age. We willsertnly remember as being one of the forefront distributors of Asian cinemain the United Kingdom, but also, I guess in the world. They moved todistributing America as well, and you know they were all about making Asiancinema extreme and they brought so many films that I'm sure you all know aboutlike audition and battle way, a and a yeah. So the I'm sure the intrying, themany people's lives of for agent cinema at the time, but their whole point wasmaking agent cinema extreme. It was all like you know as much Gore and horrorand I think for people in the in the UK. Their idea of Asian cinema was eitherthe extreme side or like Kurosawa Ozo, and I wanted to show everything inbetween. So that's how I started third window films about sixteen years ago orso, when it was, you know, the point of third window is to to show those filmsthat you wouldn't see, otherwise, so the films that won't make it on tostreaming platforms world wide. The problem probably will only go to filmfestivals, and you know there are a lot of interesting films I mean in Asia andnowadays, what I'm focusing on in Japan, but there's so many great films that Ithink people really are missing out on and that's the whole point of Sementafilms is to get these films out there. That's a really good picture of them.So we say that your personal taste and interest in film is a large part ofwhat dries. What do you decide to relieve? Yes, it's only my taste. So ifpeople don't like my taste and then they're not go like a windo films to behonest, but I've got a quite a very taste on, but I always like filmsthat are unique, an interesting and original. So you know I tried to findfilms that a you know a bit of the of the bean track and directors like sheon Sono or shine to Commoto and also like to focus on so quite young andupcoming directors. But yes, it's my tastes. You know the wind of films isjust a one man company. It's just me being running it for this long, so an Ithink I do, and I do it for myself and I'm not. I don't try to you, know,release films just for the sake of I don't know making money or I'm not I'mnot a business in that way. So it's I'm not very business like, unfortunately,I wouldn't release some of the films that I have to be honest, that's GreatSelem! So would you ever consider releasing a film that you didn'tparticularly like, but you felt that there was big viability for fed windowfilms. You know in order to you know just releasing tiny, Japaneseindependent films by themselves. Yes, the third Wendercombes will neverbecome more recognizable, so there have been times that I've released filmsthat now I do love, but the basically for example. You know I want to releasefilms that haven't that will not get released and that- and I want to makeit sure that these, for example, may be some. Some amazing small films have achance to get out there and if it wasn't for me or a company like mine,they wouldn't I find that to be a bit sad for the directors and the peoplewho involved to make in the films putting in order to do that. Forexample, like you know, Takasago is some one of my favorite directorswithout a doubt, and fireworks is one of my favorite films of all time, but Ididn't actually really want to release those Takashi Katano films that I didrelease, but I release them because everybody wants to see those films.Everybody wanted to see us from some blue rat which at the time, they're notbeing released, and obviously that would help me able to release some ofthe smaller titles. On the back of that, you know it's. I do love Don without adoubt, but I didn't feel the need to release those films, because thensomebody wasgoing to lease them anyway.

If it wasn't me, I be someone else, andI I pin that's a bit of pointless. To be honest, you know I always feel like.I also DJ and I'm a record collector, and Ithink you know when you're Djing, you can't just pay like songs that no onehas ever heard of your whole set like you sometimes need to throw in a bitmore over well known track. So people come on the dance for and then you canplay him a minor track afterwards, once they're already there and then they'll,be there be more open to listen to that. So you know: I've worked on films liketo cash, a Katano film that allow me to get those like minor films inimmediately after I see that's an excellent analogy about the the DJ. Ilove that Adam and I appreciate obviously that you need to push forsome of the larger releases and it allows you to shine alive on some ofthe stuff that would perhaps go on head of or an discovered and that's great,because we are talking images, all love, learning about films that have I'vegone under the radar yeah. I usually O my most obscure films immediately aftera major title release. That's usually how how I schedule things and balancelike a big one and a small one, it's a otherwise of a but too many small ones,people just you know. People have very short attention spans nowadays, so youreally need to balance things out, but at the same time it's not like I'mgoing to release some. You know major studio film. Just for the sake of it Imean I still need to like the films and that's. Why, for example, like theKachikata O, I still love those films. I just you know. I thought that it wasa bit pointes to release them. To be honest, certainly- and I could understand thepassion there, because I think if I was responsible for a distributioncompletely like yourself and want to make sure that you know everythingreflects my taste and I aspis that retains the integrity of what you'redoing. Is that right yeah? I guess you know the whole point I mean, and I didsort of learn this. You know when I was working in a company like Tartan andbefore that, when I was a fan of films, you know we're all I mean it depends onhow old you are and what generation you are in terms of being a film collector,but there are whether it be music or film their labels that you are drawn tobecause of the films that they release. Obviously, an obvious example would becriterion, or you know nowadays, you've got companies like Arrow and it's thesame in the in the music industry, where you know it was a littledifferent back in the past, because there wasn't so much information aboutfilms, written on the Internet and and obviously there was time service beforethe Internet and Vhs, which is which a bit of my time. But I'm you know youwould buy the next film by that label, because you trusted what that lady wasBev, was bringing to you and you'd buy it, because it was the next criterionfilm, whether you knew what the extra film as you are buying in Etten. Four,is also an example of that nowadays. But you know it was important also withwith Firin or films that, like, even if you didn't know the title which youobviously probably wouldn't, because it was a very small, Japanese minor titlethat you went got into what the type of films that I was. I was releasing astod window films and that's why the reason? Actually I did this- is becauseof Tartan films, because Tartan obviously got us all of a sorting intoAsian cinema with films like battered audition, but as they kept onsaturating the market with just crap long haired, ghost films, veryderivative, horror, films from Asia. We were, and we were buying all thesetitles that at the time, obviously they were expenses. Well, I mean, and theywere bare bones disk. He pen, like twenty pounds, for a DVD with that, hadvery poor quality image and just a trailer as an extra and you every timeyou fork out twenty quid and the films will just get worse and worse, and youthought you know, I don't want to trust this company anymore. I think that'sone of the well one of a million reasons why Tartan went under, so it'svery important to me that people buy into the brand on and will take achance on films that they don't know. I think that's a very interesting pointabout branchus, because definitely with things like the criterion collectionand when they're releasing like Michael Bay, films like the Rock and criterionit does sort of make, you think, was at really such a great brand. Is it justbecause it gets a cridhe release is necessarily a good film like or likeWes Anderson films like automatic that came out in criterion regardless ofhowever received they are, I think, when it comes down to it. Thedifference between criteria on me is that, because I'm a one man company, Ican continue to do these things but criterion, and obviously now ourbecause our have been taken over by the hut, which is one of the biggestcompanies out there. You know they end up being corporate, whether or not theytried their staff or anticolor Tal Day. They try not to they do end up becomingcorporate because they need to pay all the stuff that are getting that theyneed. I mean these. The bigger the company gets the more stuff, they needthe more stuff they have the more money they need to do so. Therefore, theyreleased the Rock and I'm a Gettin. So you know that's the difference. You know whenyou get when you become a corporation or a big company. You need to do thesethings and because I do so much in house, I've never wanted to. I meannyou can't say, sell out, but I've never...

...wanted to become bigger, it would justbecome it. Would I I'd lose any passion that that I had left were just which israpere? No, you know. I totally agree with that, because yeah no third windowname does seem to be really good in that regard and, like you say with likecriterion that just trying to like meet the odd demands of the market andtherefore the releasing anything that's going to be popular. I did Ave aquestion, though, because you did talk about that with like a lot of films,you're racing like wide an known films which lets you then release lesson ownfilms, so I'm thinking particularly with Sucamore, and they tot so filmsbecause they're, of course, available and other labels compared to some ofhis rarer stuff, which I can only really get on third window. I was justwondering how the sales are like circumdabit, er known films go comparedto his lesser own films. Given the lesson o films currently come from youreally, whereas the bellman films can be brought from other brands. Well, thething about the COMATOL titles and one of the abilities that I have been basedin Japan and being able to give me remin, actually Tatsu, I released onBlu Ray ten years ago, but I think people are only finding out about itbeing on blue race through arrows release of last year. So you know,obviously there they're a bigger company but UM. You know those two cor,mototool, obviously they're very big, and they were their big sellers for me,all of them. For the most part, but yes mainly the major ones like Tetsuo andTokyo, Piston Bullet Ballet, but whether or not they were on otherformats. I think they were only available on blue wayfor a long time and many years only only through me, and that did give mean advantage. But then I yes, if you're looking at, is his sort of less populartitles. If you were to say, like Catocala, haven't been in fact, Cotognenever even recouped the money. It cost her to buy the film in the first place.So you know when it God does come down to it. I think people everywhere justwant to watch films that they know about ahead of time and that's the theclassic to Commoto films like Tatsu or though in fairness. I think Kotoko iswithout a doubt one of his best films and is really quite criminally underseen. Considering he's such a well known, director and people love him somuch so maybe that's changed a little within the last year or two because ofour putting it out in the in the US, but I'm you know for for so many years.I had the only release of it in the world outside of Japan and it didn'tsell and that's such a shame because yeah, I really really really got intocircumdatus year. Like I saw his last year, which is a fantastic in a closed.You know room you know where on earth is he a type of thriller but every onlyreally got into like beyond Tetsuo this year? And this fan like a lot of greatstuff like even that Goblin film can remember the exact tale of it. Butthat's just such an amazing crave imagina film and you never get to talkabout as much as his other films. Do. You Walk in the Goblin just hasn't beenmore widely available. One of the reasons why a lot of companies in the world don't distribute so manyJapanese films is because Japanese studios are very hard to work with thethey're, really a pain to work with and those other titles from from sucamoreother than Hiroko the Goblin and and to a part Gemini. All the copyright ofthose films are owned by Ticobon, so they were very easy to remaster veryeasy to get out there, and that's probably one of the reasons why thosefilms are more seen than something like her oca, the Goblin, which was handledby a studio for a very long time and and just this year that studiosrelinquished the rights. So now from this year it will be released by myselfand a lot of other companies worldwide and therefore now we'll start gettingtalked about a lot more. But all in all, I think socet is without without thebest contemporary film director from Japan. Because of his consistency. Ifyou he does he's, never really made a bad film, I mean, unless you think Tedto or three is not that great, which it's not that great, but he's made since one thousand ninehundred and eighty five or so you know, if you or did with Dentacus e six wellMida s to now she's made what fifteen films or so and they're. All you know,seven or above in terms of their quality and they're. All nineteenminutes very easy to watch. Theyre all lookgreat. They will stand the test of time, they're all unique, be there. You knowhe's a fantastic, unique director and the many the Japanese directors outthere, like she own son O for one who have that sort of unique originality tothem, but their consistency in tender film making is all over the place. Imean seen so as made a lot more films than Sucamore, and yet he's made a lotless good films in in Sucamore. So you know, I think sucamore is just reallyis an amazing amazing amazing he's a director he's a fantastic person. He'sgot so much passion to him. He's a great actor on top of it is y. You knowhe's really one of the the people that...

I respect the most in the whole entireJapanese film industry, and I seriously comparison between so Commodo and sheon Sono, because they both tend to do really extreme, really interesting,really out their films. I haven't seen, I guess, a lot of Sono films bycomparison, I probably only seen seven or eight because it's just done so manyof them. The ones that I have seen have been a fairly high consistency ofquality, but I guess if I saw more of them beyond the ones that have beenpromoted- and maybe my opinion of that would change. But you know just stufflike tag is just like an amazing mind, blowing film to me, but yeah, gettingback to circumoral, probably agree with quality, even though there's some likevital, which I didn't really get into too much, or I guess the Third TetsuoFilm I'd say you know they really bad. As such I mean the worst ones, for me,maybe be a little bit mediocre. It is interesting about the third heat seebecause I don't know about other countries, but in Australia it's hasn'tbeen while e available, and I put an actually stream it through your websiteso to stream it through span Flix, which is a Portuguese or streamingservice. So I don't know if you've had any issues with availability or whetherthat's one selling a bit better, because it's less widely releasedworldwide. The Third A to I didn't take on the rights to it, because I don'treally like it that much and also the reason why the third Ted so is not asreadily available world, why? It is because it's a film that's handled by aforeign sales company. Going back to my point about stales agencies. That's thereason why a lot of films are seen or not is who owns the right and who'sselling it, and there many examples of Japanese films like that that arehandled by foreign sales agents, as in sales agents of films that are notbased in Japan and therefore they could be more expensive and it could be alittle harder to work with as well. Another example, for example, Shenstonas why don't you play in hell, is handled by a big French sales agencywho asks for a lot of money because of the company they are so you know a lotof people always say why don't you put this film out or why? Don't you putthat film out? But it's not as easy as that. To be honest, there's a lot ofmess you have to deal with, and you know I think the reason that the greatthing about supematurals with the majority of his titles, obviously notTed, two or three, but with with the majority of tales, he owns the rightsand therefore it's very easy to distribute them. Okay, I've got I'vegot one more question. I don't really want it, but I don't know if it's agood point to lead into or not, but just with the distribution. You know,obviously in based in Australia and the titles that are available. Streaminwebsite ans awesome, whatever like whenever I search proyne your Google,that comes up with a vimeo link like oh awesome, like gets trein this one line,but then it says one: No, you can Y stream it if you're in the UK island.So I do know if this is the right place to ask in a podcast, but I am sort ofinterested in the issues that are going on with that, because, obviously, I'vegot an extensive catalog I'll, be happy to rent most of the films that areavailable from him, but the option isn't really there if you're outsidethe UK or island yeah. This is also another another point. What I think alot of a lot of people around the world, especially on forms and film fans, aresaying why. Why is this Tis region lot, O? Why is this I'm only available tostream in this country or not and that's the whole point of distribution,especially for smaller films or independent company's distribution, sonot studios like Wanta brother. So I also talk about this because I producefilms and before I started producing films working just to the distributor.I was also saying why can't I release this film, you know or region, becausethen more people can see it. But when I'm looking at it from the point of aproducer, if you make a film, it cost a lot of money to make a film, and youneed to obviously try to make that money back. Which means you need tosell it as many territories as possible. If you sell it to one country, theywill buy the or the rights of that film, the the cost in comparison to sort ofthe size of the country and how much films usually sell there, and you knowhow many people are in their country and what sort of country it is in termsof film, loving fans and this, and that and the economy, and all that. So if Iwere to sell a film to England and they were to pay only a small amount, whichwould be the amount that an English company would pay for a film and theywere to release that disk and make it available, unlocked and available tothe world and then available on their website to stream world wide, then I asa producer or if I were a sales agent of a film, would have only made a tinybit of money and then that film would be available worldwide and I wouldn'tbe able to sell it anywhere else. It's the same with with film festivals andlike if you were to have nowadays in the online film festivals because ofthe the pandemic. If a film played in a film festival as online and open to theworld, then that film wouldn't be able to go to any other film festivalsbecause it is Crutius gone as a distributor. When I'm buying rightsfrom a Japanese company, I can only buy...

...rights for the territory that I work in,which is the England. This. I'm a UK based company and said window films isUK based. So if I were to buy world wide rights, it would cost a lot ofmoney up front money that I wouldn't be able to recoup. So I can only buy myterritory. Aton Brook requires it to be locked for that region, which is youknow, B or for Blur and two for DVD. So that's the reason why many people inovercoad other countries can't see the disks and why, I always say just by anorigin, blue ray player because they're not that expensive, and you know if youreally want to see all these different films that are going to be releasingyour country, then you know, spend like fifty quid or fifty dollars to eitherbuy a blue ray player that can easily be hated through remore control or byan Oregon player, and therefore you can watch anything you like or you can oruse a VP or something I mean you know. Obviously I shouldn't be saying thesethings, but you know it's not that hard to legally. If you want to see a filmfrom my side or buy a blue ray, you know it's not that hard to get aroundit in a sort of semi legal way. You heard it here, he use ten or half yourBlue Ray. It is, you know when I was got, and I obviously first started offin buying video tapes because of VHS was obviously before DVD, and that wasthe only way to see a film was to watch a third generation video tape,especially for Asian films, that won that accessible at the time, and I wasliving in America and there was a company called video search of Miamiand they would send you these massive, like handwritten catalogs or typewritercatalogs, which just film titles on it, and you would choose the title thatsounded the most interesting and then mail them o your money in the post, andthey would send you some like dodgy vhs tapes, because it was the only way tosee films and they looked awful and did most of them didn't have subtitles. Butthat's that's all you could see, and then you know things change with VCDsand then DVDs and you know at the time still living in America. I just boughta DVD player off or Amazon the I could crack whether remote control pressedthree numbers and therefore I could watch all the films that I wanted tosee around the world and buy them from Yes, Asia to get Asian films or youknow different other places, Benson's world in England. If anybodyremembers that you know, if you, if you really want tosee films, you know it. Doesn't it's not that hard to get an origion play or use a VP andwatch them? I mean it's still supporting films in general and it'snot like your was having to result the piracy. So I think there are alwaysaround it that aren't that expensive. You know sure yeah. Thanks for thesponsor I do. I do have a region in a region B player. So that's not the issue for me Lissie who men isprobably just the important time and importing it from overseas and the timeit takes to arrive. I mean I don't really have really added much to myphysical blue, ray collection of the past few years, be mainly assuming, butwhat you've said there does on to make sense. If the producers don't want tosell the rights to more than one company or they're, only going to starton an expensive amount that I really need a contact, a guess. The filmproducers themselves, if I on an Australian release, rather than youknow, trying to lobby your company to have a habit available here, yeah, Ithink, buying Australian rights. You know I probably wouldn't be that muchmore expensive, but I don't obviously I'm not set up in Australia to have a sort of logistical set up inwhat to sell things as easily over there. And you know I don't think itwould really increase the sales to a point where I could cover the cost thatI would be asked for in order to get Australian rights. To be honest, youhave bigger companies like our and or if you're looking at studios likeWarner brothers and all that that are world wide rights on films or they buyEnglish language territories and therefore they can get them out in thiscountry or not. But unfortunately I don't have those resources being justone person on my computer, so it's unfortunately, I can't help better. Youknow I think VPS are a great piece of technology. If you want to streamsomething from I'm, not gonna. Try I'm not going to say to much aboutit because I maybe I'll get in trouble, but it's a it's a useful tool,definitely useful to Lelian. I also say that I love that you went through thekind of same history of getting into films, as perhaps I did with the mailorder and just taking a punt on films where you're not really sure whatthey're about. But this sound interesting- and I can remember when Iused to browse the iles and Hare and one of the first Tartan Age. Extremefilms at a picked up was tetto. The I man and it was based just purely on thecover, are work and the description on the box. I'd hear nothing about thatand the film whatsoever, and it just blew me away, it was brilliant and I Ioften wouldn't have some of that magic...

...is lost today, because a lot of filmsare just readily available for for streaming across the world. You know,but I linen more about gon. Sorry, if you had something to I really. I reallywish the more people that are the same mindset. I think thatit's too easy nowadays so to just click on a button and learnabout any film and and what a film and I think, people don't even give filmsattention any more because they could just click on another button and watcha film for free and I think people of a certain generation I mean I'm not eventhat old, but I just was from that. On that generate I mean I don't want tostart saying, like you know, like think of the good old days or something likethat, but I'm yeah, you know, as somebody who works in distribution,does this for a living. You know I really don't like working nowadays,because it's is no fun in it. You know the there's the audiences complain. Iwas cray myself too much, but I think people you know used to just be like watching a filmwas great and now it has to be like fork or new HD, or it has to be it'sthis quality and it has to be in this box or it has to you know, be availablehere and there, and I you know from my time. Yes, you you'd have to. There wasno way you could find out about a film. I would have these massive encyc booksand you just have to like browse Oman. If you, if you didn't, know a film andthen Oh this film and and then that was only obviously for major films as well.So when you're dealing with Asian cinema, the time it was yes, it wasjust like buying it, because the title sounded good or the pot. The art work.Look, good and and films are a lot more expensive to buy back in those days aswell. You know it's not like. Nowadays, you can get like a blue ray for likefive pounds or something like that. You know, then it was like you know in theDVD time it was definitely twenty twenty pounds for a DVD with with pollquality and no extras and before then it was even harder and more expensivewith with the vas tapes as well and an even worse quality, but it was about itwas that their time and effort that used to put into discovering somethingand you felt sort of connected, I mean it's also similar with with otherthings like record collecting or if you collect the mangle or something likethat, that the time in effort you put in to finding something or discoveringsomething you didn't know about, and then you know maybe crap or may be good,but that that that time has gone into it, that you feel a sort of connectionto to what you're you're watching- and I you know- I think that that's gonenowadays in this Neflis. I really sound like an old man which I'm O, you knowit gets really that that magic is gone and people. You know it's really hard to look atmessage boards and look at forms nowadays when people are complainingabout one thing or another, but it's just its appointing to be honest, youknow it's all about in my ways all about watching films and it's one ofthe reasons why I move to Japan, because in Japan there still is thatold fashioned structure of having holdbacks and go into the cinema andand not being available to rent on DVD for for six months after and then itwill be on rental first and then buy afterwards, and then no video on demandand all that, and if you wanted to see a fin, you had to go watch it in thecinema. So I think Japan is one of those few places left in the worldwhich it isn't about the format it's about the film. So it's why I enjoyliving him to be honest, yeah t that does sound great, and it'sall about that mystery of not no matter what you're about to watch, whetherit's going to be any good or not, and that's why I love going to filmfestivals, where you've just got a slate of brand new films and some ofthem premiers, and you have a new idea, a new preconception, if ever they'regoing to be any good or not, and I love that sense of discovery. I suppose sowhen you first got into cinema, it was that sense of discovery that that youloved and did that, was that one of the main reasons thatsaw you take the career path that you did yeah for sure because, like I said,I lived in America and I lived in a bit of a nowhere of America and in Floridawhen I was a teenager and there was a luckily an independent cinema there andan independent video store and and that video storys. I don't know why it wasin this no small town in Florida, but it was probably one of the best videostores here in the world that had about forty thousand films and I ended upworking there for many years, but you know being in places like that. Thewhole concept of distribution is really something that made me wantto to do it because you know films are not like like nowadays, when you haveany film available that touch the button world wide or available in someway or form. It was all about distributors that would find thesefilms and bring them to your local cinemas and then put them out inphysical formats, whether it be vhs or DVD. But that was the way the your conection to to watching this films...

...because it wasn't available. Otherwise-and I lived in a small town where there was this independent cinema- and I sawwhen I was about twelve years old- I saw like a ringo lamb film in I think it was acity on fire or prison on fire. One of the two, a sordine local cinema thathad a local film festival and that come into Asian cinema was into to arthouseand foreign. My general time, foreign cinema at the time, and that madness of of Ringo Laman Pink on cinema in the inthe late and early s was really something that blew my mind because ifyou had been watching even if you were a big film fan of the time watchingthat heroic blood shed of of you know, John Won in go lam and coy Hark wassomething so new. I mean, obviously it's unique and it's original, becauseit's a completely different culture. You know Asia was so different and soless accessible. I mean especially places like Japan. I mean during thetime it seems so much further away from where we were in Europe or America andwatching those sort of films like you could. Never imagine a film like thatgetting made in in America or in Europe and then, as things progressed withHong Kong and Korean cinema, you saw films and then you come on to, like youknow the battle Rales and all that sort of stuff, but these films that were soover the top and so unique, and it made me really really love Asian cinema thatthat whole time I mean, but at the time time, but the only way I could seethose films was like tising ths is and then obviously Tartan came in and madeit a little more accessible to when DVDs came in and I thought you know,distribution is something that you know it. Some is something that isnecessary to get these films out there. I had studied film production andtelevision production in university, and but I didn't want to make morefilms, because there's so many films out there that are not getting seen. SoI thought getting into distribution would be the perfect way to help films,especially Asian films, that were making it over to the west get outthere. So that's yeah, that's really how how I got into it now it'sexcellent Adam. What was the fierce project that you really got involvedwith in terms of distribution? So when I, when I got into Tartan, I was stillI moved back to England and I'd love Tartan, because I as a fan-and I knew somebody who who was a producer in England- that he introduced me to the boss of Tartan andI started working as an intern there and I think, like all companies thatyou look at from the outside, I mean I'm sure. Maybe even these companiesare cried here and may be an example when you're a DVD, collector or a filmFan, you look at it. You think it's amazing and when you go in you work forthese companies, I can end up being really the opposite. I like is the end up being quite corporals andyou went and a lot of the people that work there. In fact, don't really likeill, so they don't really watch films or a awful just. What do you expect? I mean, likeI think, if you had offices of people that were like real film dogs, you know the companies of or just gounder, because they'd be like buying these films, they all loved and nobodywould really the audience wouldn't get into it and therefore the companywouldn't wouldn't make any money. So I expected before I moved to came in atartan that everybody would be like me there and the only person who was likeme there was another inter, but that you obviously stay a lot,don't even sing a float for a very long time. So how do you manage to do it? Imean I is Tayf, because it's just me like I said you know. If you, the morepeople, you have working the more money that it cost to run a company. You knowthe size of the offices and the rent and the electricity bills and thepeople's salaries like you need to do things that you you wouldn't want to dootherwise to pay all those people so literally I've I've never had an office.I've never had any staff. You know initially when I first got into it.Obviously there was a lot of things I didn't know how to do. For example, youknow subtitling or posted design or editing, or a lot of these things thatthat I didn't know how to do and over the years Tho I would. I would litaloutsource some like poste design or any of those sort of things like marketingpress would outsole to people and obviouslythat cost money. So I just thought like I'll source things once and then I'lllearn what they've done and then I'll incorporate to things. So I can do itmyself. So if I owe so s to a press company, I would just be who reviewedall the films and then try to get in contact with them and make makeconnections with them so that I could go to director to them next time or ifI outsource, Ta Post he design, I would...

...see how they I would ask to lay it outhardwork. I would see how I would learn how to use photoshop on all thesethings by looking at reading books and then learn how to design myself or ifit was subtitling. I would outsource for company and then afterwards I wouldsort of take. I would break down what they've done and then learn teachmyself how to do it. So I've spent all these years learning how to do thingsmyself so that I don't need to out, spend the money to ask somebody else todo it. So it's become yes, just all all myself and if my computer broke, Idon't know why. I do to be honest, because everything is either in mycomputer or in my head and if I were to get ill, then I'd be in trouble. So Ihave to work non, stop and hope that I don't get ill this to be clear. You doabsolutely everything yourself like when you go to your website, all thePost Rock. It's you all th advertising for it. It's you that that's incredible!Some of the the illustrated posters I can't illustrate yet. I need to learnso I do out saw some of the illustrated posters, but if you're looking at them,you know the layout of posters. I mean most of the time it's mostly just thethe Japanese posties that have been altered in one way or another. So I dothat and then said the late layouts out and and yes, obviously do all thefacebook and twitter and website and any males or anything comes in its justto me. And then you know if it in terms of the now the DVD bonus features Iinto all the interviews at see on the disks unless that they were initiallydone when the com was made by the Japanese company they're all done by me,usually in my house, the audio commentaries I'll go to the directorwith my with my computer and we record the Otototoi commentaries and then alsotatleen myself and a lot of basic editing as well as much as I can. I doit myself, but then, when it comes to, for example,getting my titles on to Amazon so that they can be sold. That's where I need acompany like Arrow films who can actually work as a middle man to get mytitles on to Amazon. When I was pacing the UK, I would post stuff out myself.I would go to the post office every day and pull stuff out, but because I'malso producing and doing a lot of other things in Japan. I need a company likeour films to actually handle the the physical distribution ofmy titles to Amazon. So that's the only thing I sort of don't do myself on thespeaking of physical distribution. I'm just curious because I've never been meinside of this. So in terms of like getting your films out on Blue Road, doyou like make one master of it and then send it to a factory that produces theblue ray and the plastic Ford of everything? Yes and obviously that'sanother reason why I need a company like our films, because if I were to goto Sony and say like, can you press up like one thousand copies of this? BlueRay would cost a fortune, and there are ways nowadays that, even I think,Amazon and some of these companies do that, like sort of very small scaledistribution like if you want to put out a CD or a book or something you cango direct to these companies, but because of fortune, because you're onlymaking limited runs so it for many years. It's now our used to beMetrodome, and I used to be World Cinema Company called cinema who,who are now owned by cousin. I needed to get my titles handled by a largercompany who are usually making like tens of thousands of discs to Sony sothat I can get their Ravali negotiated rates and therefore I ask Arrow to place an order with soneed to print up a thousand just so a tight of it of a master that I've justsent over and then so ne tend those disks on to a warehouse which Arrowthen handle the sort of back and forth between that warehouse. Like you know,as an independent tribute, it would be impossible for me to do these thingsmyself, what it would just make the cost per disc so high that I would needto put the sales prices up a lot and therefore nobody would probably buythem. To be honest, so I do need these sort of figure companies like Arrow toact as those middle men. Arow has been coming up several times in thisconversation. So far, so it's you working relationship with, especiallyconsidering how they seem to be releasing many of the same films as youin different markets. For three years. I've been switching through these.These middle men, distributors- I mean there, aren't as many as they used tobe and because, obviously distribution is God dying up and physicaldistribution is dying. There aren't that many of these companies out therein the initial it was a comedic Metrodome who are a distributor onthemselves and that company Metrodome ended up going going bankrupt years ago,but they would handle they would have of mind and over the years Ye has tochange a few years ago I went to Arrow because they are quite similar companyin the fact that there are a boutique...

...label that work on sort of more outthere, films and they had a very solid fan base. So I thought it would be avery good company to work with, but they're, not we're not officiallyconnected like they don't finance my films and we don't work together on anyfilms, in fact, when they release the Tatsu films, despite the fact that Iwas a person who originally remastered all of them with Sucamore, I didn'tknow that they were going to release them till they were released. Peoplethink that you know we are connected in that way, and I thought that that youknow at least you know. Ask me or say we want to release, is something in theUS, but I didn't know it about it until until they release on themselves. Sothere's no actual connection to us other than the fact that they are amiddle man between me and Amazon, and they allow me to tell my titles throughtheir their website, which obviously considering their huge reach is a verygood thing for me. But at the same time they are a big corporation, now ownedby the hut, which, if you don't know about them, they own Zavy and also theywere supposed to be the sponsors for Manchester United Football Club thisyear. So they re very, very big company, and because of that, they do charge mean awful lot to be honest. So it's not that it's not as Nice, as as I wish itwas to be honest, and actually I used to be nicer, but ever since they gottaken over they've really offered their prices. I'd love to know a bit moreAdam about how you pick your films, I mean: Do you see cat films at filmfestivals? Do you have companies that contact you directly? We regarding newreleases, so what kind of avenues do you have to take to acquire new filmsfor Your Label? Well, initially, yes, I would go to a lot of film festivals and,in a mad, a lot of the big film festivals. Like can you have the filmfestival where they just screen the films, and you have these things calledmarkets where there are loads of big oratorium and there's loads of filmcompanies selling their films to buy us like myself and in those places, you'dsee all the obviously every all the companies, including all the Asiancompanies, and they have their boots and then they'd be trying to selltitles that weren't released yet or their catalog titles and in thoseplaces you'd go to these people and these sales agents, and they would say,we've got this new title that we think probably suit you and then they'd giveme a DVD to watch it. And if I liked it, then obviously I asked them aboutacquiring it. So that was one one way of finding outabout a lot of films before anyone else and film first was obviously anotherway, because the audience reaction can be a big part of of also buying a film.It's not just that. I like the film, but lots of people seem to like it andtherefore it's probably a good film worth acquiring. But when you'redealing with all these middle men like sales agents, you know, obviously theprices for these things get more and more expensive. So over the years, I'vestarted to work closer with directors and producers, so that I can get in atthe very beginning on titles that are still, I could acquire for either verycheap or I could take for for three in exchange for, for example, handlingworldwide film festival. So my job has sort of changed not just from fromdistribution, but also to international sales myself or be also getting into production. So,for example, films, like one cut of the dead, was a film that I had got in atthe very beginning and took the world wide rights and then Otriad in England,myself and in sold the rights to to other countries lying companies like shudder as well,and also obviously, I brought that film to film festivals, World Wide, so yeah,that's one way of getting in early, but I think being set based in Japannowadays allows me to see films at a very early age, especially forindependent films that probably wouldn't even go to film festivals. Youknow, I think people really with it with with Japanese films in particular,they only sing a very small amount of Japanese film. That of getting outthere Moma to the amount of films have actually made him release each it'sover six hundred films that are getting released and, to be honest, most o themare awful. But what I would do is I would speak in being able to speak.Japanese. I would go to the cinema in Tokyo five times a week and seeeverything that I could and it's awful, because they're really shit a lot ofthe time, but I erthely really shit a lot of these films. But you know one:In a million films you you're able to grab a either sea potential in adirector like Shicho, who had the direct of one kind of the dead who Isaw his short films that are small screening here and therefore followedhim O to be able to get one of the color of the dead early or you. You seea very good, independent film and you can get in there before anyone else andtherefore gives you exclusivity and makes it very cheap to buy. But I'm I ewatch yeah yeah a lot of a lot of films...

...and I also, as I work as a filmfestival program as well. I was to the studio film, so I'm connected to a lotof the Japanese production companies that a yeah. You have to really it's alot of work to try to find anything good because yeah, they must have morefur, but you know back in the days it used to be a lot different, becausewhen I was really doing my best in terms of releasing was probably aroundtwo thousand and ten eleven and there were a lot of really really goodJapanese films at the time and nowadays they just they're just none, and thatis- is really hard because you know I want to release films but there's justno films to release. So in that case I need to go and maybe focus more oncatalog titles, all the films that haven't been released before or haven'tmade it to blue ray or something. So it's a it's possably. I'd love torelease some more some all Japanese quickie comedies like I used to, butthey're just none around. Why do you think that is yeah? I mean I don't I don't know I mean I think you know. Japanese cinema hasbeen dying for a long time. You know the Japanese film system isreally prap. They have this thing called a film committe system and theway the Japanese films are made is that I mean this has been going on for forquite a long time. You know, but Japanese films, even independentfilms, are made in a way that like in order not to put risk on to onecompanies, so that in case the film bonds that one company goes down, theyhave lots of small companies make a film together, but the problem is: isthat all those companies are basically not film related. I mean they're, likeMusic Company, a Publishing Company and a Film Model Agency and a musicianagency, and they put they put all these companies together and make a thing alla film committee, and that Film Committee makes a film, but it becausethey're, all these people involved with it. They all are there for a reason, sothey want their new song to be in that film or they want their mango to beadapted to adapted or they want some tie up by putting their new model ornew idol into the film and it's a sort of very old fashioned, like Americantype system, and the problem with Japanese is that if you know anythingabout Japanese salaryman culture, it's quite robotic and you have all thesesuits. That can't decide themselves. It's a very Japanese don't like to takeon responsibility. So you have all these different companies all thesedifferent salary men for each company in meetings, but nobody can make adecision at all and anything. Even if you want to change the color ofsomething every single salary man has to go back to the company and thenasked a person above them who asked a person above them and then above themand then comes down and down and down in back o these meetings and is likethree weeks to change, can change a color of a website or something so the creativity obviously gets gets. Itgets lost in that way, and you know it can be very yeah very hard to makeanything decent. Also, I think you know Japan is to if you've lived in Japan ifyou've been to Japan. IITS. Have you guys all been here for for a long, along bit of time I've never been to Japan. Sadly, I'd love to, but Ihaven't had the opportunity. Yet no I've never been to Japan a me. Neitherso we're all owed to look a bit. Japan is a very clean, very organized. It'sfantastic to live, it's a really great, but it's you know it's too clean andand too nice and two you know. There's no stress. I mean the stress of likethe robotic life of of going to work for long long hours, it's very tough orto live in work in Japan because of the long as you have to work on the companystructure. But there there's no there's no troubles. It's it's like one. Youcan have like a five year old. You See M. I mean when I first came to Japancoming from from London, and- and you know London is a pretty decent place tolive, and yet you wouldn't have like a five year old going to school byhimself on the train, I mean it's even ten year olds I mean you takin thenight bus home, it son, he you'd be pretty scared, but in Japan, like evenin Tokyo, like just kids, like five years old wo like go to schoolthemselves on the train, I mean it's insane, so you know this. It's such a asafe place that you know it's. I think it's a bit boring to be honest in termsof you know, I think the reason why youwere seeing a lot of good cinema from from, for example, Korea, is becauseKorea has so much. You know it was a military dictatorship until the late st. So you know within a generation you had. You know this, this listless lifeof like no democracy, and then you have this constant threat of war. We withNorth Korea and then at the same time,...

...this heavy influx of of American pop culture and all these theyoung kids today and the next generation is completely opposite, andyou know there's there's so much that breeds creativity there and in Japan.They don't have that. So I think Japanese cinema just is showing thatthe there's not much going on in life. I mean, if you watch any Japanesedramas, they, like some guy, broke up with his girlfriend or something andthen he's like really depressed and and like that's about it. I mean for themajority of Japanese dramas. They've got no stress points, but then, if youlook at Japanese cinema of the s like so Gois films, a senior to Camot, SonoSion, all those people came from a time in Japan. That was like pretty crazy,like in the in the early S, there was like drug culture and there was likethere was like a Yankee. It's these sort of like gang cultures, lots of fights, lots of good music lotsof craziness like that breeds good creativity which which, throughfilmmakers breeds, interesting films and really there's the young kids inJapan nowadays are very apathetic o they don't have that Punko or passion.There's no passion, I think in the younger kids nowadays and coupled withthis sort of film committee system of like suits making films, I mean it's like a doublebad, like you know so, yeah. I think that's why you know whatyou guys are in myself. Well talking about Sucum, Senor and and son of Sion,but like they're, like you know, fits and sixty year old people, I meanthere's no young people nowadays in Japan. Unfortunately, compared to you,know, Korea or other paces in Asia yeah. It is kind of interesting because whenyou think about contemporary Japanese films, you usually think of you knowanima films and the struggle ones and the ones that I come afterwards thingslike a whisker away. But of course that's not really the heart hitting youknow really out their dramas. That's you know more fantasy. That seems to bea list for a lot of you know: Japanese school making gets concentrated thesedays on the F Boundes, rather on the ARD down to Earth like greediness, orsomething like that. So well, I mean Ted to ways. Go Fan to seethem this to de down to Earth, as in like more likeevery day type of thing, I know it's quite fantastic with all the metalthings whatever happens to him, but you know it's is an every man's tower orwhatever it's not it's not. You know you know, animals can talk and whateverlike leaping through time or whatever they get like all the anima films thatcome out Rut they've come up in the recent years. Well, no, actually, Ithink there are a lot of because you just to they're just not releasedoverseas, but you know, Japanese human drama tales are a diamond dozen andthen they don't get seen obvious because they're not very good. You knowyou see those anime films and those fantasy films. You know, I think it'sall about our image. I mean whether, like you said, if you're in Australian,you don't see that many Japanese Sims, you only see the films that are beingdistributed by there and therefore those are the films that are the eitherthe big studio films will. The anime and therefore your idea of Japaneseculture on Japanese cinema becomes that and it was the same with Tartan. Asiaextreme is that people were thinking like Japan, like they're, killingschool kids every day and, like you know, they're every person's got thislong, haired ghost everywhere, and but it's you know that. That's all we see.So that's what we think of as part of that that culture, but you know,Japanese human drama films- are really like there, like four hundred of themevery year and they're awful, because they're boring as hell and they'rethey're, incredibly poorly made in the fact that you know Japanese, don't puta lot of time into post production of films, so they're very flat. They don'thave you know they don't look good, Japanesedramas for the most part I mean, maybe you see the Cariati films, but that'sthat's. You know very different. You know their big budget, films and Coriatis obviously very talented, but he also has a lot of foreign input in terms ofthe way that he makes him releases films. Honestly Yeah, you know, maybe it's forthe best that a lot of these Japanese films aren't are distributed to behonest, erthe. They are really not so good that, unfortunately- andthat's probably one of the reasons why also I got into production here- and Iyou know being a distributor- you can only distribute what's out there and ifthere's nothing out there, then what can you do? So? I think, taking thatstep into film production myself is allows me to make something moreinteresting or, in the terms of, for example,handling international sales for films, finding those smaller films and gettingthem out there when they might not get seen. I think in this day and day of ofNetflix and video world wide Internet distribution, I think there is slightlya small space left in in film distribution, especially incountries like Japanthat have so many...

...small films that don't get released. Ilove the consistency there because, as a teenager, your thought was that youdidn't want to get into production because there were so many films andnow something gets later. You still havemore or less to save you, but it's you want to get into production becausethere aren't that many films, anymore yeah exactly I mean, I think, obviouslyalso you know when you're just I talked to some other distributors similar tome a lot about this, but you know when you're a distributor, especially withJapanese companies. Japanese companies are really hard to work with because ofthis film committee system you have in Japan, there are every actor and everybody in Japan where the directors in their own by talent, agencies and thesetalien agencies are very controlling and there, if you look up even for oneexample, Johnny's entertainment, who are a music talent agency who, on allthe big Japanese bands and is so controlling not only of their of thetalent who they don't pay much and they put under these big contracts, sothey're not allowed to quit and they have to work non. Stop but they're.Also controlling about how they let the media access what they've done so thisJohnny's Entertainment Company for an example is they don't allow photos oftheir actors or their singers to be used on the Internet. So, for example, ifyou, if they had one of the actors, was in a film- and I wanted as to be thatfilm- I wouldn't be allowed to publicize any part of that film- thatthat actor had been in that, like I wasn't Abed to like use a photo allthat actor as like as like on the on the the cover of the DVD or I wouldn'tbe able to on the website, use any photo that had to do with an actor. Imean it's like it's insane when you think about it, so these, like insanerules that I'd have to abide with this distributor means that I, like you, canonly distribute the film as we've told you, so you can only use this poster.Even if it's like a fucking shit poster. You know you can only use this trailer,even if this trailer doesn't at all make this room. Look any good. You know,and if you look at a Japanese trailers, I mean they're awful, I mean you can'timagine anybody outside of Japan. Wi want to watch these films, but notbeing able to adapt. Those makes it very hard for myself as distributor, soI think getting into production allows you tohave more control in the way that a film gets out there, and I think thatthat's is you know, is very important becauseyou know, if you are told you have to release a film in a certain way, thenit's just no fun to be honest, and if it's no fun, then you don't really wantto do it. You know you lose the passion involved, so I think that's how I sortof yeah got into to production and also yes, some being able to help some ofthese Japanese directors get their films out there when they might not beable to in Japan, because actually, a lot of these directors like she on sonot come on to senior or the directors that we know as Japanese or Asian filmfans are not popular in Japan. In fact, there's always is always a correlation.If a film bonds in Japan, it will probably work overseas, and if a filmwas popular in Japan, it probably will bone over skies, because the films thatare popular in Japan are awful they're there, always television spinoffs, theylook like they made for television, no matter the what you have the budget ofthey're based on Manga. You know people obviously make me not know about. Youknow they have idols. Who plays the lead roles there?Acting is awful. You know, they're, they're, really really bad or Japanesestudio films I mean, and yet these films from directors like she on Sono,like you know, we all think of like Shonson, was like this big, Japanesedirector, but up until very recently- and that was not until he made like astudio from in Japan like he was just all assumes lost money. I mean it'salso like. If you look at people like Kinky duck as well in Korea like hecan't even get the auto, he couldn't he had now, but he he couldn't even gettheatric releases of his films in Korea and yet overseas he's this big name. SoJapan is quite weird like that, and I think getting a to being able to workwith these directors who are more popular overseas than in Japan. Allowedme to sort of you know, help them get films made which theycouldn't get them made. I mean I made it a film with she on Sono because hecouldn't get it made in Japan, so I had to come in over and help him, so Ithink yeah that was a sort of like obvious route into into production. Itnow is going to be my next question, because it's impressive that your veryfirst production was with Sono and Grat is one of his probably morestraightforward, Fili, it's a great one, very emotional one. So t e tell us alittle bit about your experience,...

...working on Landfolk and Jest Workinwith Yon Zona and how you continued producing. Yes, I obviously worked asas a distributor of Seonsan of films with love expose cold fish and he misat the time- and I was a big Fan and he was obviously very popular overseas when those films of weren't actuallypopular in Japan and Sion Sono is a very in the moment. Type of type ofperson he's very creative and he does things now and only now, and he doesn'tlook back at his films. He only wants to make new things and land of hope wasat a time. Obviously, when the earthquake and the nuclear powerplanted, Fukushima had happened in Japan. He wanted to make a film aboutthat, but because it was sort of critic, world critic, quite critical of nuclearpower and for Gushin no Japanese companies wanted to to help him. So one of the producers of the film whowas Japanese had had a had a very international mindset and I'd workedwith with hers. It was a woman on some other on a other films of his adistributor, and she said, like you, know, Joanna comeover and help, and I came to Japan and helped with with the financing and thisand that and that's actually how I learnt about this film committee system,because that was also ended. Up being a film committee, Film and- and I thoughtmyself and going back to the point of like looking at things on the outsidein terms of like you know, companies like carton like wow. She on son isgoing to be like Super Independent, and you know we're going to have so muchcreativity and when you come to Japan, like you end up in the system, I wasit's just like, like anything else like it's a it's, the complete opposite ofwhat you expect and she anson himself of course, of course, and his set isGer, creative and wild. But then behind it you know it's still a Japanese filmand it still has this film committee system involves in this nonsense aboutwaiting three weeks to change the color of something, and it was sodisappointing because I wanted to help she on so no you know- maybe I wasquite naive. Actually an maybe thinking was more independent than it actuallywas, but it ended up being quite a sort of Japanese film committee type film,and you know I worked on it a D, but it you know me and an Sono wanted to do alot more, that there actually a lot couldn't be done because of the waythat the structure was involved in that and that set up, which is the way thatall Japanese films are made. So you know I learned a lot about that, butthen I also learnt to do things more independently. Like Ialways do you know, I watch other people and then I learn how to dothings myself and I went on to making full completely independent films afterthat, so with Uchida, who we were talking about earlier, the director ofgrateful dead and Netflix is the Ne make a director. We made a couple supersuper independent films, so the in that case, like everything, come I dideverything myself. I nearly killed myself working. Youknow doing absolutely every single aspect of that from shooting the makingof I mean, obviously crowd funding to raise the money so that no companieswould get involved in having to sell or my record collection and my clothes andeverything like that to to raise money. Wow then, crowd funding in multiplecountries in Japan and and overseas, and then even shooting the film in my in myhouse, and because we needed more locations moving apartment during thisbouting. So the wee can adicora tions and then shooting like he lo having to shoot in my local bar, butbecause my bar would only allow the shoot the very earl in the morning, butthey closed at night. I had to go there in the middle of the nightafter after everyone went home for Soonne last day, shoot and then waitthere until morning with the keys so that I could open it up and so thescenes in the far and then- and I didn't sleep at the whole entire filmshoot, not one second and then afterwards having to handle theinternational film festivals and the international distribution and thendistributing the film myself in Japan and in Japan. The way that a film isdistributed. As for an independent film, in order to get people to come to thecinema, you have like events every single night, like you hide you, youbringing other film directors or actors, and you do talk shows after the filmwas played so for like six weeks. Every single day in the cinema we had liketalk, shows that I organized and did the MC and invited the guests and thenafter every talk, so you have to drink with the directors till the morning, soI will drink a morning and and then go home and then seep for like an hour andthen go back to the cinema and yeah. That was, the director ended up with the last dayof it going to hospital for about a week and well, I was gonna say that the of itsown. That sounds like an awesome experience that if it's your job andit's repetitive and it's every single night, that must be a nightmare O it'sa nightmare on your body. That's for...

...sure I mean it's fun, because you knowthe whole. It's like running a film festival as nothing like a red topic.For me about for like six weeks, you know- and it's great because I thinkyou know going to the cinemas- is obviously such an important thing. Ifyou're into films, I mean I know nowadays and anything could be watchedby click of a button. But you know being in the cinema is, is not justgreat, but I think in Japan with independent films. The way we do thisis we make it an experience like every Japanese super independent film inorder to get people to come to the cinema so that they experienced ofcoming to cinemas. They do these, like these talk events every single day thattheir film is playing, and it's amazing to see if you could, you were to cometo like Tokyo and, like any evening, show of any independent film likethey'll, be like the cast and the crew will be there on stage, and you knowit's really. It's like it's like a real like a being on a film festival, andbut in order to get different customers in every night, you have to like have alot of variety, so you'd be like. So I'd have to get like a different,direct, a different talent or something, and even just trying to find likestrange ways of like getting trains, people that weren't connected to thefilm to come and do a talk, because you don't want to have like the samedirectors every day, because then the same people come and watch the film. So,like I think one time like I got like a wrestler like a female wrestler and amale wrestler. One of this guy called lady bed, SI's quite quite famous like no. No, hedoes like, like heavy metal. He dresses like a in a a in like a sort ofJapanese close play, but he has a beard, he's an Australian guy actually and helives in. He works in in Japan and he does sings like like heavy metal, butalso does like wrestling with like this female wrestling. Idol an IT's greatand I would get my people like that. Come to the cinema and do talk eventsso that we get like different audience to come to watch the film, because thepeople who were interested in that would never watch our film. But youknow it's a way of my people to come and watch the film that we made soevery single night. You know I'd have to think every day. I have to think ofwhat sort of guest and then be able to schedule a guest and and and then getthem to the cinema and then do talk events with them and then bring themout to eat and drink after every night. So it's a for one person, it's quitehard to be honest and and quite tough on your body, but it's it's adefinitely an experience to look back upon. I guess definitely I mean I would spend a lotmore time in the Senie knew that I was going to be getting crazy. Events likethat attach the films that are going through Wat that that does so brilliantwit depends on the Tonietta like boring drama, but it depends also on thepeople involved. I mean if you were to see like a you know: Nishimura film, like you know, theseare meebo machine. All that you know. I think they invited pretty crazy gueststo to talk and- and I tried to vary it up as much as I could. But but whetheror not you know it's a crazy event or not. You know, I think, a lot of peoplethat are losing their passion for going to watch movies in the cinemas, mainlyjust because you know you can watch it at home any way the click of a buttonfor a lot cheaper. But if you were to be in a cinema with the cast and thecrew and be able to talk to the cast and people involved with him after thescreening, I think it would really make you want to go to the cinema and makeyou paying that cinema charge of fifteen pounds or whatever or whateverit is wherever you know make. You feel, give you a lot more value for the money.So I think that experience itself is important for everyone involved and Ithink Tokyo really has that not just talking of many cinemas and many pacesin Japan have that and and that's really why I love working indistributing in Japan, because in England you know I could barely get anyof my films even like them, like one kind of the dead, it's like impossibleto get in the cinemas there, because they're just showing like just studiofilms, and even if it's art house, it's just a can films, but in Japan you canhave like the most whole super independent films getplayed in cineas for like three weeks, I'm not just talk like a one offscreening, I'm talking like three weeks for like a no budget, film yeah. Wedidn't have enough of that over here. Sadly, but luckily that you know thereare enough festivals and independence, and it is have enough interest in filmson for people who want to seek out the more obscure films I've got to say. I OA love. The kind of grass roots approach you've taken throughout yourcareer with the window, films and all the different roles that you've takenupon yourself to learn, and I'm kind of curious as to which is your, which isthe most favorite part of your job. Your most rewarding part of it, I thinkyes, the most rewarding part is, is doing something that I can feel that ifit wasn't, if I hadn't have done it, then, for example, that film mightnever ever be seen or I that film that...

...this director wanted to make might havenever been made, or those are the film things that reward me so, like I saidgoing back to to Cascarano films, I love to Kaigan more than anything, andI love films like Birwas, but me release them is a bit poinen joy ofreleasing them. Despite the fact that fireworks is one of my favorite filmsof all time, I didn't get a joy of releasing it, because, if I hadn't havedone it, somebody would have, but the films like, for example, legend of thestatus brothers. If I hadn't have big fine that found that film than it wouldhave been to this day and for the next, how many years been been lost, and it'ssuch a o, crazy, film and unique film and and a wonderful film that I wouldbe such an awful thing for a film like that to have never been being released,and you know, I think that that I get a lot of, I feel, really happy andexcited, and it brings back my passion to doing this because obviously doingthis sort of thing for so long, you lose a lot of the passion that you haveand the lot of the will to to live half the time to be honest but yea if it wasn't for for them forthe work I did then they'd never ever ever be seen. Then you know that reallymakes me feel happy, even if that movie doesn't make any money in the end. Youknow it's just I feel like it would be a waste, and Ifeel it would be so disappointing for, like you know, a film like the legendof Status Brothers to never get out there and that for thirty five years ithad never been seen overseas and in Japan it wasn't even known of so. Youknow. I think I do feel so so happy that that film is now starting to reacha large audience world wide. You know I put years into to it, and and andthat's yeah- that's really one of those things. That rewards me. That's as anamazing segway too, because you shared two films with us from your variousrimming service that we could talk about a little bit today and obviouslyit legend of the story that others is one of them, and it's thinks prettygood example of what you talked about earlier to about the directors comingup in the s and the drugs and the music and the weirdness, because, like thisone feels a bit like not sure the acid trip is the best description, but it's it's a mad film. It's a crazy film,it's a creative film. It mixes up to man different aesthetic expressionsjust has so much fun with all of it. So maybe you could talk a little bit ofabout what made this film so special to that film is. Is I mean when you talkabout cult cinema? I think a lot of people in the world are that's such aGreat Cup from rocky horror, all that you know, but a lot of the time. Coldfilms only become cult films, as we know when their main stream most the colpin. Nobody seen open, andcan you it's like if a tree falls in the in the wood does doesn't make asound. You know it's like. Is it it's not really a cul film into its mainstream, and I think you know that the the legend of the stars, Brothers, ismy day idea of what a real cold film is because of the fact that that filmshould be massive. The people that involved with that film it's insane.First of all, it's the directorial debut of Tesakala O's son, TESCO Samo.Maybe his name nowadays doesn't have the pull that it used to, but anybodyknows an astro boy or Kimber. The Lion I mean Tisico Samo was in essence likeDisney the wall Disney of Japan, and if anybody watches anime or read the Manga,like that's somehow connected this guy testcase, I mean it's really.Unfortunately, you know everybody nowadays knows of me as a KI and studioDibley, but I'm Tesi Samon TESCO productions was the most importantaspect of anime. Why anime is big nowadays and his son made this film ashis debut film. So it's you know. We took one of the biggest names inJapanese culture. His son makes this like crazy, like acid trip type of athing with, and the people that are involved with that, like other than thefact that you have all these massive Manga artists, like Monkey Punch withthe loop on the third and your similar, a Yankee who did like a sailor. Moonlike that start out starring this film and then you have a power like crisake.Can Film, first of all winner, could a o kill she in the film and that hadyour Seda in the film another big Japanese director and all these massivenames are a Zaicko. His was one of Japanese, most famous singers of thetime everyone's involved with this film, and it's from nobody knows of this filmis even in Japan. I mean you think. Maybe those people like Tesaoua or likeas I to you co might not be so so well known overseas, but like even in Japan,the son was was completely a bomb and I guess that's, what makes a sort of coldfilm inaspence like anything, not just...

...like a tiny supper, independent filmthat nobody's ever heard of that you know becomes cult because I don'tknow it's so bad or something like that. Like a cold filminess. In my opinion,my opinion should be something that should should have been something thateverybody knew of and for some reason it didn't, because it was too crazy,and you know that that's why I think this start us brothers is sointeresting, because there's no reason why everyone in Japan shouldn't know ofthis film, but it just there was so many different aspects that came aroundit at the time of its release and it just bonded and it bombed so bad whenit was listen, Japan that everyone connected the film didn't want justcompletely forgot about it. They're all traumatized by it and a director didn'twant to make another film afterwards for years. So it's sort of all thesethings led it to becoming more and more forgotten, and luckily I was able tosee a thirty five millimeter screening of it like a at a one off screening inJapan many years ago, and I thought why is why is: Does nobody know of thisfilm? Why is this who never being released overseas, and I spoke to thedirector- and I said just let me remaster this film and let me bring usto the world and he lent me so we cleaned it up as best as we couldconsidering. It was sodden sixteen millimeter, but a lot of the originalfilm have been lost, so we had to piece together, thirty five millimetertheatrical prince of it and we cleaned it up as best as we could, and then Ihad to bring it to film festivals and and start to create a word for thisfilm that hadn't been unknown of. So it's not like you could look it up onthe on a book some way because nobody never been released. Obviously, so Ihad to generate word of mouth by bring it to about thirty film festivals andthen start selling it to some companies worldwide distributed. I myself put outthe vinyl myself and then sold it to like a company like movie, who played it world wide and therefore madeit more and more well known. So it was a real passion project of mine. To behonest and think in you, in a few years time that will be thought of as, likethe cult, Japanese, Phantom of the Paradise or rocky horror picture show,and I think you know once it becomes mainstream, it will be known as cult,it's free that you mentioned a front to the paradise there, because that's whatit kind of reminded me of when I was watching it. You know it's just got allthese bizarre musical numbers and these brilliant striking set pieces thatstraddle a variety of Jones. You know there's lots of comedy with elements ofhorror as well, and what was it that really made you fall in love of thisunder scene Jam. Well, I think the most important part of any musical is themusic and the funny thing about that film. It's a very strange way that thefilm was made as the film started off as a sound track that was made by a guywho wanted to make a musical film, but he couldn't make a film, so he made asound track that accompanied this music film that didn't exist. Well, thissoundtrack, the legend of the startes process, was actually M E N Onethousand nine hundred and eighty the film itself was a one thousand ninehundred and eighty five, so the music was made first and the music was madeas if it accompanied a film. So, like I said, the music is a very importantpart of a musical and the music was very, very good. Having that great music, I mean he'ssort of like lots of music videos. Put together, I mean it's like a o MTV film,if MTV want to make a film in Japan at the time, but you know I think thatmusic with so many different genres of things from anime to just like crazycar chase sequences- and I think it just came from the fact like all these,like they were all young kids who made that fantasia himself, a dark theres,only twenty two at the time and just the naive passion of just like doinganything they wanted to, like. Let's just put everything we can to this film,whether it's sticks or not, and that's what made it sort of so so o energeticand so charming. I think you know the main two actors in the film are notactors that I mean, I think, it's quite obvious by the they're acting butthey're musicians themselves, and it was just like, let's just like all get together withour friends and make this a crazy thing and actually talking about Phantomother paradise, the director and he, the guy who madethe original Santi, were big fans of Phantom of the paradise and all thosefilms like rocky horror, and you know American cull films of of thatgeneration. I think they put it all that they were like just like dogs. Youknow like digs, and they put everything all these etrange inspirations fromfrom what they've seen into like their own mixed it up with their own cultureand made this sum out of it. And if you watch the film to the end of thecredits, which I know a lot of people don't watch nowadays, the film actuallyis dedicated to Winsor Leach, who is obviously the main character fromPhantom of the Paradise. So you know the e they put. They put the lot ofOmas. In that respect. It's a very interesting film and thefan of the Parradis connection does...

...make sense. Well, I saw a lot hill,comparing it to a letter box was a hard day's night at the Beatles filmed. Itdoes have that son of energy, when I watched it and the comparson that cameto mind of me was pink floyd the wall it meet Scooby Doo, just thatcombination of sort of like an eel engaged music video like pink Ford e te War plus of the craziness of Scooby Doo, but yeah. It's also just aborderline surreal film as a part where they're eating each other withdifferent folks and like it in a small version of themselves, and yes,completely bronces but like in the best possible way and like it's downrighthilarious. At times like they're perform these songs and these supersaturated colors, and then you have cut to this black and white audiencereaction, stops of the audience and were not getting the music so yeah in acompletely awesome film, which has like so many references from like theAmerican stuff, but also UK stuff. I think, like a hard day's night, wouldbe an inspiration yeah. I think a lot of these people, obviously the evolvedfrom that time. I mean also Monti, python and things like that were reallybig in Japan at the time, and I think that's sort of like to real aspect ofyou know. British culture in that respect also really found its way intowhat they were doing. Creativity, wise and I think that's why you get a lot ofthose directors from that time who make made that those sort of energetic andcreative films now. But you know the thing about that film is, you know it'sa product of its time involved and they actually all got together the direct inthe cast and the crew and made a new version of it a few years ago, and it'sawful for the first thing that comes to mind. There is when Masaki Hio watchedhis son codle first film and he just walked out the midway and had a smokebut, but was also be to for you because ooproduced this as Barbara as well. So as that there's the long process of notspeaking about this movie yeah, I mean barber itself was also a very troubledproduction and- and you know, I'd spent a few years working as this completelyfully independent film, with with like the outage films like a low life, loveand other colds and m. But it was a film committee film, but because,unfortunately, of the status brothers, I was so excited and so passionateabout that film than when Tesakala about me coming in to help him makeBarbara, I thought so yeah. Of course you know. I must because this guy gave us the startus brothers, but I should have actually spent a little more time thinking aboutthe brand new legend of the starters brothers and realized that maybe hewasn't the Taisia of old. But I think the film Barbara is it's a bitdisappointing. Speaking, very frankly, because there were a lot of problems that wecouldn't a lot of things. We couldn't do creativity, wise because of the filmcommittee system, and also because of the massive names that were involvedwith the film that the big actors are. So I don't. I can't speak so so fondlyabout the film, because it was three years of my time that I feel was reallya bit disait wasted, because I think the film could have been something alot better if there hadn't been so many big names involved. To be honest, Ithink Christopher Doyl, especially as a is somebody who likes working off thecuff and when you have massive idols, that that are playing the lead roles.So I think it really kills the creativity on set and it doesn't Love R,any any of the Coffer Passion at work and Tessa himself. I think also had towork within that. So it's a bitter. I don't respeto talk about the film somuch and I even I should because I do obviously want people to see it and thedistributing it. I'm distrubing it because I need to make sort of themoney back t lost from the other men yeah I mean. Hopefully, people don'tlisten to this people to buy it in. But you know it's yeah, it's not a it's,not that terrible of a film, but it's just maybe I think you know I'm overlycritical as well, especially of films that I produce, because I'm quite acontrolling person. I put so much into things that I'm if it doesn't turn outthe way that I wanted to you know I do feel a lot harsher on it, and I am veryharsh about all the films that I've produced, including the land of hope,especially and of this. I know that a lot o there are a lot of fans ofBarbara and it's. I want some awards and played it. Some big film festivals-and there are some people online- that like quite a lot but personally, I'mlooking at it in a D in a very strict and very harsh horse eyes and I'mlooking at it in a way of what, if you know what, if we had done this and thatto it- and it's quite hard, I think doing these big things, and I shouldhave learned and Italy with the problems with land of hope and alsoFugean for Fogo flats, and I need to go back into super super independent films,where I think my wife will kill me. If I spend like six weeks in the cinemaagain, I maybe I wasn't married at the...

...time. I think- and you know when I wasdoing those films and then the cinema talked and in drinking till morningevery night, and I think especially, I had a kid recently and I think it has made me realize that I can't dothose things as much and maybe it's a maybe I've become a little moreconservative and my back hoods and all these things that you did when you geta bit older. I guess BOCAL REFLATE S, anyways! Thank you. You also shared one more film with usand it might be a film that put a more positive spin, a what we were talkingabout earlier regarding the lack of great new depayse films. We just thisis a brand new film, it's beyond the infinite two minutes, and I mean atleast me. This was such a fond right and it's obviously the done on a shoestring, Bud Shit and just with a very unique concept and on the face of it,it's a very different film from the legend of the startes brothers, becauseorigin storage brothers is over the top. It has all of these effects. It's socrazy and beyond the S, no two minutes is eese set in one or two locations.It's like a very true string, but they both have this kind of wonderful energyabout that. You can really feel that we're having fun making it. So maybeyou can talk I bit about. Why pick this film? What we spoke about it and how weare distributing it right now and how it's doing well, the best on film tocompare it to is one and of the dead, and that was in a film that also Ihandled worldwide, film festivals and international sales and distributionand everything else in the same way that I'm doing with this film beyondthe inferno two minutes and it's the one cut of the dead of twenty twentyone, even though it was released in Japan in two thousand and twenty, andit's when, on the same traditore of one kind of the dead in the fact that itwas a a debut film director was done on as a sort of workshop film in Japan.You have these films that are sort of like super independent films that aremade for like schools or made for like film festivals. One can of the dead wasmade for a school. It was actually all done by actors who pay to be in thefilm as part of a process in which they learn to act and they make a film atthe same time, it's quite a common thing in in Japan. These these workshopfilms, as they call them. That's a very liveliness in your films for sure. Yes,exactly and unfortunately, with one kind of the dead, all those people arepaid to be in the film that ended up grossing thirty million dollars in thein Japan of a twenty five thousand dollar budget. They didn't get paid forit at all. I mean that's not not. If it was me, I would have definitely paidthem, but that I was only handling the film for the international side and Iunfortunately couldn't do any of that, but one kind of did it was made forthis school and it was released. The way that this this workshop worked wasthat they would make it for this school and then they would screen it in thecinema, the same cinema for every one of their works of films. For for twoweeks and every day the cast would go into the cinema and it ended up beingthis film that sold out in that cinema for like three months and then gotpicked up by the Japanese cinema chains and played nationwise and all the bigcinemas and beyond the infinite. Two minutes was made for a very, very localfilm festival called the Shimkin Festival and it was made this filmfester was done in a cinema called Hollywood, which is about a thirty seat,cinema in smoke as our in Tokyo, and they made this film just for this smallcinema and the small Film Festival- and this film also like one- could ave dead,sold out in that cinema for like three months and got picked up by the big,too cinemas chain and went on to becoming this nat massive nationwidehit not to the same extent of one cut of the dead because it was during Ovid.So this was last year, so it only obviously that that really affected theamount of people that could see it, but considering it was made for like twentyfive thousand dollars. It still got over twenty thousand admissions forduring coved and during all these cinema restrictions. So it's quite bigfilm, but yes, I, like one cut, I got in there very early and took the worldwide rights and now bringing it to a film festival. So it's only just beenstarting to play. Film festivals: It's only played four or five pill, first ofall so far, but it's already one six awards in those four or five filmfestivals and it's booked in that I booked it into film festival, so allaround the world. So will we being by the end of the year, I'm sure to be avery big film and then I'll distribute it on blue ay and DVD and e suchafterwards. One. The big part of the film's appeal for me, was the fact thatit's doing one shot or giving the appearance of one shot through someclever editing quite similar to to one course of the dead as well, and we alsodid a episodes, podcast episode, focusedspecifically on films that weredone in one shot. So it's a shame that...

...we hadn't seen that before we did thatepisode, because it definitely would have been included. I'm curious to findout, if you've seen an influx of these kind of one shop filmed approaches downin Japan since the successive one cut to the dead and obviously that we nowknow that beyond the infant two minutes as been a success in its native countryas well. So have you seen quite a few copy cat acouchis trying to emulatethat success? Yeah there've been a few that I I'm popping to mind at the moment, butI know that they have been a few one co, their similar one cup films andobviously the work shop. I mean they're. This concept of works of filmsobviously has been going on actually for a while in Japan, but becausesuccessive one kind of the dead. Obviously you know it's a big way tomake a lot of money, so there have been a lot more of these workshop type.Films that have been coming along, I think be on the infare two minutes isthe reason why it's also it's done in one short is that the film is actuallymade by a theater troop called a Europe Ki Kaku and there's as Er TheaterCompany. They used obviously to one shot because theater is one shot I mean.Actually one can of the dead was based on a theater play and that's why it washad the one cut, because it's based on a one cut theater play. So you know Ithink, that allowed them to use small locations and make it one cut to tobecause it's how they probably be doing it anyway, if they were doing it in thetheater but yeah they obviously like anywhere in the world. When somethinghits you know they are copy cats and it's no different than Japan. I meanthey always try to do things like one cut films that are similar to one colorthe dead and because everyone in Japan knows of one Clod dibes. It was such aone in one hundred years type film I mean you couldn't even you I mean playwhich project is some sort of an example, but I don't think player,which even is that comparable to one car, the dereme one cat that is so muchsmaller and you know also being a foreign film to make it so muchinternationally. And you know the direct of the artist is just remade onecut of the dead, so it's a academy award winning director is made a remakeof it already. So it's it's excessive is on parallel. That's brilliant, Adam!A thank you so much for bringing it to our attention because we all absolutelyloved beyond the infinite two minutes. So I can't wait to let there's ageneral release over here and I can hopefully buy a physical copy to to addto my collection, a Yit get even one kind of the dead. I mean that film Ibrought it to over one hundred film festivals and tritest played it threetimes sold out and then, when I went to the Prince Charles Cinema, saying likeof where one kind of that had played three times sold out at frypan said.Can you play this for a week? They were like no we'll give you like one day inthe afternoon. It's just so hard to get a theatric or general release and inEngland. So I don't really. I hope that what be on the Internet two minutes canget out there in the way the won cut did, but even one cut only played liketwenty cinemas and and each cinema only played for like two screening so and Idon't really think it'll get out there in the cinema, which is unfortunatebecause it's a good film to watch in the cinema with people. But you know at least you know, it'llget out and diving in Blur and I'm sure in Australia. I mean I'm talking tosome film festivals in Australia Right now about the film, so I'm sure it'llget into a few cities in Australia towards the end of this year and then,hopefully you can get picked up for distribution, so you can so it's moreaccessible than some of the minor films said that I've handled in the past.Okay, I think so- and that's really good to hear, because I didn't reallyenjoy beyond the infinite two minutes, especially like the whole, like paradox,notion and they're scared of doing an they give in to the future. In casethey break. The paradox remind me a lot of twelve monkeys, the Terry Gilliamfilm, but like on a smaller budget. They are very interesting, film andyeah. I'd love to see it playing one of the film festivals over here yeah.Hopefully more people see that because yeah, it's not you know the ending doesfisle out a little bit and it's not. Obviously it does have some problemsbecause of its minor budget and sort of at amateur approach. But you know, Ithink that does add to its charm and it's all things are, then it it'sseventy minutes. So it's a very easy and fun, and I think it was a fun thimto watch with an audience. To be honest, you know, I think it's really somethingthat people will enjoy at film festivals and people will talk aboutbecause it's something different. I think people want to see something. Youknow in this chaos of Ovid in the world. You know some people want is hissomething a little short and fun and different and something they can talkabout afterwards and makes them feel a bit cheerful completely agree. I mean yes in my fitslove a little bit at the end and Tustain to meet it tropes, to put thelot long, but I mean the basic concept is so unique and so interesting it doesthis idea that you have a loop from two minutes in the future and that's alland you can make a full movie out of it and with so much harm and excitementmean you well don't see that many films...

...that me just get that core concept andjust build on it and has so much fun with it, and it's just absolutelyamazing to see- and it's also amazing, that it came from such a low bunch play.Do you think that this type of film, so either the workshop film or Thes, thesevery lobetski AL films, might be the future for really interesting creativefilms from Japan? Yeah I mean you know the whole concept of worksop films. They have very, very bad and they'revery you know, plus a minos points. I mean the minus points. Obviously, arethese examples like one card of dead, where the film INS or going becomingvery successful, and that the people who have starred in the film haveessentially paid for it to be in it? And I think you know if you wouldexplain that to anybody in the West time, so they get they be pretty pissedoff. You know for the people that are involved, but at the same time it's theenergy, and you know yes, I n energy. I guess so of all these people that arethat are passionate about making something- and I think not having a lotof money sometimes can give the best creativity, because you don't have toanswer to anybody. You can do whatever you want the films at that I've donelike low life love, I mean they were just really no budget films, somereally not hadn't, had no budget whatsoever, and I think that allows somuch creativity, even though, if it's a lot of work, because you have bally anystaff and to work with just a few people on set- and it's tough but it'sfun and allows you to do so. Much and I think, because the success of thosesins like be only in for a two minutes on one could ear dead, hopefully we'llsee a lot more energetic and also, I think, entertainment is something thatdid it's a funny thing to say for when we,when previously were talking about Japanese missing out on Hon human filmsand having only fantasy films. But actually Japanese Japan, don't makethat many entertainment films. They make a lot of boring human drama, butnot many entertainment films, so they're, very poor about making funfilms. Of course they have the fewer we only kinsin films, but those are biginternational productions by major studios like Warner Brothers, but interms of independent films that they don't make entertainment films in Japan.They make human dramas. So, due to the success of one cut and be on theinfeority, I think hopefully we can see more Japanese independ entertainmentfilms and that I think, would be really interesting if it does come to come tolight, because you know I want to see unique, entertaining films, you know beliving in Japan and going to the the local, independent cinemas and watchingboring dramas. All the time I mean I love dramas if they're good, but mostof the time they're not, and I think it'd be nice if they could make somemore crazy films like they did in the past. Definitely I hope so too, and Ithink with that we can go out to our QA section because they have a fewquestions from our fore members. So Tom done that's the first question, yeahsure, sir. We have a question from Bevis who's, a fan of one thousand nineund, and I emily to punk cinema and he wants to know, did the supermatch dowell and if so, is the only chance of seeing more bock sets from this scene?And he says any of this Sono box set same thing and a proper release ofnoisy requiem would be heaven sent. But the succumbunt box set is not mind.It's a our release. So I think there is quite a common misconception. Ireleased all the sucum films, but I released them individually over theyears since ten years ago. So the book said the hour released. I think it didwell, but it was also convenient because all the rights the film waswere handled by one person and it's easy to make a box of films that arehandled by one one, rights, holder and box sets can be very complicatedbecause, if you're dealing with different companies that on the rightsit's very hard hard to negotiate on a film by film basis for films that werein a box itself. So you know, for example, the she on Sono films orhandled by many different companies, and on top of that, if you want to onblue ray the films need to be in a correct definition and, as I said, thesucum films I had worked with him to remaster all of them because he ownedthe rights and I was very easy to remaster them, but the seonsan films,the rights all over the place, there's no high definition materials. It's youknow I couldn't have a Ford to do, even if I could afford them. I don't thinkit'd be possible because of rights to remaster everything myself I mean youdo still need the Japanese companies or other people involved in the actualremastering process, because it's expensive, I know Sin Sono had a boxs,which I have myself on dvd the early...

...years box. It was released in Japan,but they're all titles that don't have high deficient materials and the thingabout she, an Sono himself different Sucamore, is at chion. Sono, as I said,is, is living only in the past in the pretor and in the present he lives onlyin the present and in the future. He doesn't want to look back at his oldfilms, so he doesn't want to remaster them. He doesn't care if they if theyget rereleased, and sometimes you need that you know like with with start usbrothers to TESCO. You know had a will and he had the rights to allow me to doit and with the succeet films. He also wanted to remaster them as well. But ifthe director is not interested in, if the rights are a problem, then it's noteasy to do that. So I don't think that'll be a she on Sono box.Unfortunately, and I don't think a lot of those, she on son of films will beable to get he out there in blue ray because of all these things, but Iguess you know for the some of the other peer directors of the time. Youknow, I think, maybe there was a thing recently called that atimia eightmillimeter madness series, which were remastered films from per filmfestivals, that included Iseo Skomo Ye Motomachi son as on all those things,and that also brings a rights issue. I wanted to re release that box becausethey had been remastered, but the problem with a lot of Japanese films ofthat time is the music rights they because they were, they were done asindependent, but they didn't clear the world wide music. So I think a lot ofthings all connected to that had timelimited mad is the play. They wereallowed to play international film festivals because they killed the musicfor that, but they weren't allowed to be sold for distribution because ofmusic rights, and the thing about startes brothers is a Hasaga on themusic rights, because here on the soundtrack, so it was able. But if youlook at, for example, to come, otises come tantum of regular size, which waspart of that Pan, a milimeter generation that was not the rights arenot cleared, so all those films from that time because music rights, theycan't be screened, they can't be distributed overseas. So it's sort ofkilled that I mean. I know I'm for ise so goes crazy. Thunder road, his debutfrom one thousand nine hundred and eighty I've been trying to clear themusic for that for like years and I've just managed to clear them. So it costsa lot. So that is one from from that era that I will be bringing out on BlueRay, maybe later this year or beginning of next year, but that would be thefirst time the film has ever been distributed overseas because we finallycould clear the music rights at a high cost. So it's yeah, there's so manyissues to do a distribution. To be honest, especially for all the films,you know a lot of people. Can you put this in or that film out? But it's it'snot as easy as that. That's so frustrating, and it's also more or lessanswered the Taves is full of question because he had a long post about thehow we really wanted to actually release that the exact collection offilms. But I did also ask if you have any intention of diving even deeperinto you, know the cold or even experimental in my scene, from the S aswell. That's also yeah comes down to materials. You know, I think, a lot ofthe films that were made. I mean going back to Comodo and also start USbrothers. You know those films that were independent. They just happened tohave directors that held the rights. I mean a lot of those times areindependent they're, still the rights or issues, because some of them weremade by companies that have gone bankrupt and therefore the rightsbecome very complicated to deal with. Or you know the masters get the damage.It's a lot. It's yeah! It's not easy to get those ings out there to be honestand, and that's why you only tend to see the major films like a Sespe, illyTetsuo, and all that, because there's also market out there, if you're goingto spend all the money to remaster them, which is not cheap in Japan. Japan isvery expensive to remaster things. You know you need to have at least titlesthat are big enough, that people will buy. I mean having to remaster likesome very, very cold films that nobody's really heard of just a bit o apoint Ess, even if you were to get the rights and get the materials of thecost involved in remastered, where nobody really wants to. When you can'treally sell them, it's just not possible. But then, if you look at, forexample, the pink films that I did, the pink films actually have came aboutbecause there's a company in Germany call rapid eye movies and they bought ascanner. They were able to get the masters to Germany and they remasteredthem themselves, and therefore I was able to release them. Alongside withthis rapid eye movies. Company, but in most the majority of cases, Japanesecompanies won't allow the prince to go overseas. I mean I've tried so manytimes with speaking to companies. Like you know, let me have the print andI'll bring it to Germany or my friend owns a scanner and we'll scan it, andand therefore you will have a brand new master of the film and you can use thatthree release in Japan, but they won't...

...allow the print to go overseas. So it'sreally it's as frustrating for me as it is for a lot of people that havewritten in. I think okay, we've also got a question here from mature or taprock is one of our French shoes es he's written. Clearly, third window has apretty clear, Brad identity, but how sensor do you think it is for a smallerdistributor to focus on a niche? Have you any plans of expanding your niche?If anything, my niece had probably gotten a little more narrow. To behonest because I was doing Korean and Hong Kong films in the past, and I'veended up focusing solely on Japanese films. I think it's just because I livein Japan and I be Japanese and I'm so connected to Japanese culture that it'sbecome like this, though in essence, you know, though youknow, I do actually have a variety of films that I'm releasing nowadays thatare a little more mainstream, some respect and therefore may be slightlythe nition that I mean I'm not just handling, for example, justexperimental, Japanese films or just horror films. I mean there's quite avariety of films release, so it's nice and the fact that it's only Japanesecinema, but within that there's quite a variety of films. I don't think it's going to open up. SoI think this is this is about it. On next question is from Lone Wolf, whois a very big fan of you label? He says I owned several TOR window films and Ihave a dozen questions about what me Wi the name release or not, but I'll tryto refrain from asking them. However, I'm interested in hearing about yourpink to box sets and if there was any kind of backlash to them, given in theEmiren of perhaps seeing these films as sexist a controversial today. To bevery frank, those films, as I just mentioned, came from a company calledrapid eye movies and they are the owner, really loves, pink and ExperimentalCinema. To be honest, actually I'm not a big fan of when I was a teenager. Iwas really interested to learning about pink cinema because it was sointeresting in the way that it was in its relation to Japanese, film historyand many directors that came from pink cinema and the many political aspectsof pink cinema. But, as I got all this fines, I think I became a little moreconservative and I don't watch pink films nowadays and, in fact, a bit O,I'm quite shy when it comes to any six on schooner, usually fast forward it.So I didn't think myself. I would have released any pink films because of yesany sort of backlash, and also because they're not really my taste nowadays,but this rapid eye movies company. I really respect and love the owner andalways try to help him out and he had remastered them, but he needed to sellthe rights to raise a little more money. So I said, look I'll help you out. Ofcourse you know and I'll release these films in England, and I that that'sthat's what I did that so they're, probably less personal films comparedto any other films that I've released and in terms of back last, yes, Ithought maybe there could be, but then I think you know having a surprisingly places like the Fi tookthem on to their video on the man platform, and then a movie took themworld wide, and I think you know yes, there could be a back lass. But thenagain I think if you think about it I mean I know a lot of people, don'tthink. Nowadays they just blow up on the Internet and write on twitter andall that. But if you think about first of all they're, not that bad andthey're, not that overly sexist, and yet they do. They are quite importantin Japanese history, and especially in history of Japanese cinema and pinkcinema in many aspects is as well. So you know, I think, first of all you ifyou have one film directed by the person who went on to do, shall wedance. You know, there's a lot of importance into his film early firms ofin their pink or not getting out there so yeah. Maybe I think I was a littlesurprised how how why they went in the end- that's Great Adam, so I've got aquestion from underhand and he wants to know how streaming this faring in Japan.So one time it looked like a dream solution to seeing more Japanese filmsin the West, but it hasn't really materialized. Yet he think about Japanand and going back to the the point of dealing with Japanese companies and howhard they it is to deal with them as I as an over seas. Distributor is toJapan the reason why a load of Japanese some don't get overseas and the reasonwhy the distributors have found it hard to work with Japanese companies isJapanese sums make their money back in Japan. It's very rare. I mean it's likeIndian films and Bollywood. You know they are made for Japanese and theymake their money back in Japan, so they don't really think about theinternational aspect of their films,...

...because it's really pocket change tothem. You know if it was obviously directors themselves might want theirfilms to be seen a film festivals and get seen worldwide, but directors don'tmake any decisions about how a film is released over seas or even withinwithin Japan, because of this film committee system, so think you know,because the Japanese mindset of companies are thinking of Japan andbecause Japan is still all fashioned in the way that people go to. The mainfinancial aspect of a film is to is to cinemas. They make the money in cinemasand then rental, video rental and video on demand. This is just a it's, not bigthing here, because it's not a big thing here. They don't think about itbeing a big thing overseas and therefore you know they don't reallyit's hard to deal with with Japanese companies if you were to want to buyvideo on demand rights. So that's why I think a lot of Japanese films aren'tmaking it on to video on demand worldwide when yester tether should bean opportunity to, but I think recently there are the Japan Foundation, who area sort of government connected body that are located in Australia and inEngland they run film festivals and they promote Japanese culture,including Japanese film, recently they've been trying to run their ownplatform to promote Japanese cinema world wide. I know they've done itthrough Ovid by doing online, film festivals and now they want to do it ona permanent basis, and I think that might be one way because they have alot of money and their government connected that they will bring moreJapanese films streaming world wider through their own platform. So, following on with the or streamingquestions, we had another question actually from Lone Wolf and what he realized and a few other years,as are pointed aloud, is a lot of our third window. Films are also showing onmovie, which is a service that he has. I have a lot of us in the form havemovie accounts, so it was just interested in what the story is aboutthe Partnership Between Your Company and movie and whether more of yourreleases will be popping up on movie. The on the opines is t is only in thefact that they are a video on the man service like like Netflix and they buyfilms and as somebody who owns the rights to films. Obviously I want tomake some money back from those films by selling ten to companies. Like movie?U M! U, fortunately, movie, don't really pay much for the films becauseof the fact that they need to put so much money into getting the films outthere in terms of subtitling them in many different languages and amarketing, and all that. So you know I've had a few films that I've managedto sell to movie, but there's no real sort of like official partnership inthat respect. Just like maybe films that I bought the right, I mean interms of world wide rights like start as brothers was one that I had theworld wide rights and they were interested in it and they bought it toplay on their platform worldwide, but know it sort of depends on the films,because they're also quite selective about what films they play and theylike to Blake Neflis they like to buy worldwide rights on films, because it'snot really worth them buying per territory. So there are many films thatI are worldwide rights on and therefore there aren't that many that I can geton there all right. Thank you. I'm sure some people will be sad to hear that.So I am not the question from Ms Three one. Four who asks has turbinof filmsever considered expanding to TV, especially for Japan. He says: There'sa lot of good team dramas that haven't been released with English up titlesyet, and would this be something you'd be interested in putting out not not aspecially? To be honest, I think first of all the costs of making- I mean,maybe he's talking about dreaming, but then again it's not easyto negotiate dreaming rights for Japanese. Anything, as I previouslymentioned, it's very hard to deal with Japanese companies in terms ofstreaming, but in terms of physical, the costs of sub tiling, all theepisodes, the cost of putting them on multiple disks and the cost of the BBCis a big problem in America. You can release the film unrated, but inEngland you have to release a film certified by the BBC and the BBC arecharged by minute of screen time, which is why I always try to buy short films,and I don't like buying long films because it costs thousands of poundsfor them to certify a film. It's insane when you think about the in this, inessence, could be stopping many films from getting out there because we'retalking thousands of pounds it could be for for a long film like love exposureor something. So it's really. If it's a TV series, you know you're talkinghours and hours and hours and that's thousands upon thousands of pounds justto get a certification, it's insane costs, and yes, something that Idefinitely won't Doi do sound like this,...

...a lot of war. You can love with that.So I didn't blame you at all. I don't. We've got a fascinating question yerfor me now I'll say when you produce films, do you give the directors, car,Blanch or wather times when you intervened as a producer? And if so,what were those moments? Usually it's in the post productionthat I interfere or I have interfered. You know. I think the problem withJapanese cinema is post production is a very small thought in Japanese filmsbecause of this, the culture of this film committeesystem. You know it's all about getting the sales points into the film. So, asI mentioned, the Music Company get the music in there that the Talon y justneed to get their stars into it and therefore they're just really makingsort of that film. Those parts are added in the film and whether the filmwas good or not is is a bit of an afterthought, because it doesn't haveto be good if those parts in Japan- because you know, if you have a veryfamous idol in the film you- can you easily make money whether the film isgood or not? So I don't think they put so much effort into making of them lookgood or to making a film tight. I mean they. They never get involved in thepost production and because I think the Japanese directors don't really they're,not very good, about post production either. I mean, I think, the one bigpoem with Japanese cinemas that that they're all of them are too long,including, for example, see on son a I mean, with the exception of loveexposure. Surprisingly, a lot of Japanese directors be because nobody'ssitting by them because and telling them. Maybe you should make thistighter. Maybe this scene is irrelevant, etc, etc. They just put everything thatthey've shot into the film, be they don't want to cut out a scene becausethey had there was a card seeing the shoot or or this and that so you have alot of S. I think most Japanese films could be made much better if they forone were better edited and if two they had more work done in them on postproduction in terms of making them look better. So the work at what I've doneas a producer is a lot of making the films tighter in editing and makingthem look better in terms of grading them and sound design, and these sortof things I mean, usually, though, exactly aren't so interested in thatall the daggers that I've worked. They're, not interested in that postboxin side of things- and I am so I've really done a lot for love and other cults. Itook out one hour of it actually because it was like became veryoverblotted, but usually what I do is I'll the director. I will have the filmas he wants, if you tell a director saying cut this or that you make youmake them get a bit too emotional and whether or not they think it's probablya good idea to cut it or not. They might not think in that way and ifsomebody's telling them like anybody, if you tell somebody don't do something, they D, they won't listen to you. So what I do is I take it and I rearedit myself and then I show it that today direct and I say what do you thinkabout this: Do you think this is better like this or maybe we should? We shouldput you all those in a my version. We should mix it up and we we talk and wemake it better in that way, so that yeah, I wouldn't tell the director likeyou, you have to remove this or not, but I sort of hint I in a very strongway, men at some point. Okay, we have a final like NA question from shared withus. What releases are you most proud of, because I forget a lot of the filmsthat I've done, because I'm doing so many and then you know, I'm sure thereare a lot in the past that I'm very proud of, like confessions, was onethat was a big hit in England that played a lot of cinemas and it sold etelevision. So I'm very proud of that obviously and fish stories with anotherone and love exposure is an other ones. But then again I think probably yes, the films that I've putin a lot of time and effort like bates brothers and low life, love, probablyones that I'm more proud of, but maybe that's only because they'rein my recent memory- and I forget what I've done when I what happened in thepast, so yeah I'll stick with those for the time, but I'm sure if I would havethink in a few minutes, I'd polly say something else: It's a pretty good listanyways to Adam. So, thank you so much and thank you so much for sittingDonita today and there are any last shout outs or even now to just have ourlisteners all to yourself is anything you would like to tell them. Before youfinished interview, I use an to apologize for the fact that I ramble ona lot and I go on very tangent on I, and I I wonder sometimes if, if peoplereally can follow what I'm talking about or people have probably got verybored a long time ago, and I apologize ahead of time always and I always thinkthat I'll try to be a little more concise and it never actually happens.So that's all, I could say is a if there's anything you want to, oranybody wants for the clarification or...

...have any questions on anybody can emailme at any time any bud, and I will speak to anybody, I'm always replyingto anybody by email and if it's, if you send by twitter or facebook orinstagram many messages our apply immediately. So if anybody has anyquestions or wants to hear a little more any time, I'm always available, and Ithank everyone for for trying to understand what I'm talking about, butabsolutely like that. An it's been very easy to follow it, and it's been just athis great listen to I'm sorry for drag are dragging on and I hope you can edityou can make a, but it doesn't last as so many hours you could run a marathonlisteners. I think. No, I don't think you relieve the most anything. I thinkthis is a pretty much perfect as this actually is that it's been that's itlike. Well, I thank you for for setting it up, and I think everyone also hadany questions for having interest and being excited about third window films,because it's such a small personal thing that I'm always excited thatanybody gets finds out about it. That's brilliant, Adam! Thank you. So muchyou've been an absolutely wonderful guest to interview. It's been a realpleasure this morning, so thank you again for all of your time is muchappreciated. Thank you and Er. Yes, I enjoy the rest of your Sunday. You have been listening to talking invices official PODCAST OF ISM FORCO.

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