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Talking Images
Talking Images

Episode 34 · 1 year ago

How We Got Into Cinema, Part 2: The Other Hosts

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

It is origin story time, again! 

In our very first episode, the original hosts detailed exactly how they got into cinema. Now, it is time to hear from those who have joined us since then.

Listen in as Matthieu, Adam (from New York), Lauren and Sol tell you exactly how they got into cinema.

Be shocked, as Matthieu reveals he's a child of DVDs not VHS.

Discover who actually studied film, who edited Forrest Gump and Die Hard together and who went to science camp.

And of course, marvel as Sol details his love of gamification.

It is all here in our part 2 of how we got into cinema.

You are listening to talking images, the official podcast of ICM Forumcom. Welcome back everyone. I'm mat you, and today's episode is a little different, which is why I'm hosting it instead of Chris. Were doing a remake of an early episode of this podcast, which was all about how the hosts got into cinema. Since then we've had new voices during the PODCAST, myself included, so we decided to hear from the people who are not on that episode. To that purpose, I'm joined by three wonderful cohosts, Lohan, soul an Adam. The ones among you with the best memories might notice that Adam was already in the original episode, but this is Adam from New York, not Adam from Scotland, so it's all new content. With that's out of the way, let's start on a simple but possibly difficult to answer a question. What's is your first memory of what you go them? I this is Adam from New York, not you. I'm going to disappoint you. I don't have a memory of watching a first film. What I can say is I don't remember my first movie by but I know what it was as a very small child. My mother tells me I was obsessed with the Classic Disney Movie Dumbo, so much so even that she got tired of renting it from the video store and just bought the VHS and apparently watched it dozens of times. I'm again. I'm talking about is, as you know, a two year old or a three year old. But I've absolutely no memory of the movie and what's more, I'm never really become interested in classic Disney. It's by far the the earliest Disney movie I saw my entire life, until I saw fanti shirt this year, so I guess it would be a real outlayer in my cine my interests. But it was technically, from what I've heard, the first movie I've seen. I just don't remember it. Hi. It soul from Australia. The earliest film I remember seeing is a tricky question because I've been told quite a few times by my parents which film I saw first. So I don't know if I actually remember seeing it or whether them telling me that again again is sort of put in my mind that I do actually remember being there. Anyway, the film was the adventures of my Liwin Otis. It's a film from nineteen eighty six and I'm born in nineteen eighty six, but I didn't see it as you like a three week old infant or anything. It actually came out in Australia in nineteen ninety, so I would have been about three to four years old when it came out. So that's the earliest one that I know of in terms of actual memories that I've got rather than suggested memories by my parents. They, alas, will remember anything of years. Cinderella, the Disney film from nineteen fifty, and that's no not a case of me going back thirty six years to watch it. It was released in Australia in nineteen ninety one, so at that stage it would have been about four years old. I just remember a couple of, I don't know, guess scenes from the film or even just a few shots and maybe my position the audience, which is kind of interesting in terms of remembering a significant part of a film. I'm not sure. Probably the earliest I probably could think of would be something like home alone, which I would have seen probably the first time in nine hundred and ninety two, nine hundred and ninety three, shortly after it came out of home video. But that's a film as we've discussed in previous podcast. That of traumatizes me a bit. I've seen it quite a few times over the years, so I don't know if I remember seeing the first time or whether I've just got there her memories of it, because I would have watched it, you know, guess five to ten times well growing up. So yeah, I don't really have a straight answer for that. There's a few other films a bit more recent than that that I do remember, but it's sort of like I'm more remember, you know, the experience of going there, like I remember what the theater will look like, when we went to see the Lion King of one thousand, nine hundred and ninety four when I was about seven years old, but I don't actually remember the film. or I remember seeing Star Wars when it was released in nine hundred and ninety seven. I remember going into a theater, I don't actually recall the film, which I have since watched since then. So again, him a bit of false memories, blurred memories in there along with it. Danser, I'm sorry, but for me, unfortune, there's no easy answer to that one. I'M LAAREN MS box. Yeah, I don't really have a like a specific memory of the first film, but I asked my mom earlier today what she thought and she said I was probably around three, which would have been about ninety four, and she thinks it was probably some of the early Disney films and things like land before time or the Arista cats or Cinderella. I do remember watching them before time and aristacats like a lot when I was younger, but I don't remember really how old I was. I do know that one of the first films that I saw at the cinema was bade because my my grandma took me to see it and then she basically swore off eating Bacon and she only started eating Bacon again in the last few years, which is a random and when I'll try to...

...think about like my first sort of real memory, I do remember having a dream or a nightmare when I was around four, two, six, don't really remember. It all kind of burst together, which was kind of inspired by total recalls. So I know I watched that quite early and the memory I'm in the dream is sort of like I only have a vague memory of it, but I remembered there was this kind of like space station airport type of thing overlooking Mars and there were these like museum exhibit things with like brains in them and the glass of the at the Space Station crapped and then everything started going crazy and that's like all I remember. So I know I was watching that kind of stuff quite early, but I don't actually remember watching the film itself. Just remember the dream. That is really interesting, though, and and I guess sat also you would have kind of traumatic memories of watching things as a chag dot being influenced by what you sad seem, and I guess I l'man I don't, probably because we just repressed it. I really don't personally just remember watching your thing, my doll, until was like ten or eleven, but undoubtedly I did. I do. I do remember that the aristocrats was my favorite Disney going up, even though I wasn't watching many films, but the first one I really remember watching wasn't the cinema that you love on and that was the empress new groove, which I guess is not the most renowned Disney fan, but I remember loving it at that time anyway. And Yeah, it's interesting that it's all Disney. It guess it's pretty predictable, but jes. They really has a quite behold on children everywhere. But Not really choose what our first film is. Obviously, I mean we all watch Disney films. Are we all remember our first memory is all Disney film or, in the case of Babe, it's not Disney film, but it's a scripture children's film. It's not us who choose to watch that. So I guess what I want now is buying that. How did you really first get into movies? How old were you? When did it happened, and was there a particular film that was decisive in you really starting to be a cinefied or maybe exploring cinema? More so, for me, it match you. There was one distinctive moving and it's interesting you mentioned this, the the common theme of Disney in our childhoods, because I guess that's what parents in those days did when they they needed something to distract their kids. These days I see so many parents wore just and IPAD in front of their kids and showing some sort of sing songy nonsense on Youtube and in order to know, get the the TV to parent the kids for a while. I guess it was Disney back in the day. I think I think the first movie I saw in theaters might have been the Little Mermaid, and I can start remember going to the movie theaters around when I was, you know, five, six, nine, nineteen ninety. I remember seeing home alone. I remember seeing back to the future part three. So we were very much a moviegoing family. But the one movie that really turned me into a cinephile, I guess, was strangers on a train and I think I might have been about eight or nine years old and I just remember sitting at home with my dad and it came on the TV. I want to say was on a classic movie channel. Maybe was on AMC, which is sort of classic movie channel here in the United States, and he asked if I wanted to see with them and I said sure, and I was just just totally entranced. I don't know up until then how many sort of older movies I had seen, but it felt just it was so stylish, it was so full of these sort of delicious crime scenario of this no two bachelor's who are switching murders for each other. It begins with this this strange and trading encounter on a train and it was my introduction to hitchcock and I was. I was totally in tranced and I became obsessed after that with hitchcock and that's how I really sort of became very interested in movies. Yes, that isn't. Twenty two is a great one, definitely one of my favorite hitchcocks as well, and it's cook is also, I guess, one way that many of us get into movies right these early stage fall not of Cinephas. But yeah, as I said, what and they when? But anyway, what's about you song? So this was an interesting question, so I decided I would chat to my mom to that about it and see what she recorded me. And what she said is that from as young as she can remember, I was always interested in films. As a child, or is a infant or whatever. I was very, you know, hard to control and get interested, but if there was something showing run TV or set me from the TV, I'd get fixate from that quite easily. And she even recounted some stories about, you know, how I'd go to the park with my younger brother and I wouldn't want to go on the slides or anything. So I wasn't a very physical person, but I was very entranced by cinema. And she's often given me stories about how, when I was really young, they'll take me to the movies and I'd sort of like run out to the very front of the theater with a big screen. So I just like look up at that big...

...screen and just be really fascinated by the whole projection of it, which I guess as a younger child compared to when I do it now, and I do occasionally still want to the front now and getting a bit bored and nobody else's in the theater and it must just just them massive back then. But yeah, definitely from a very early age. I definitely remember when I was maybe eight nine years old, I started to keep a record all the films that I was watching and just putting stars and the because I used to be obsessed with the TV guides and seeing what movers were showing and trying to watch, you know, the four or five staff films because, as you know, an eight or nine year old that's you know, that was my reference point for the film's worth watching or not. And then I like keeping a record of my own ratings, which was all kind of interesting, but I don't think it was really until is about thirteen or fourteen years old that it really came and really turn from being just, you know, interested in keeping track of writings to actually seeking out films that are a little bit different, the more acclaimed films out there. And if I was going to give a film that probably started my cinematic journey as a hardcore cetophile, I wish I could say strangers on the train, because that's an amazing film. It's my favorite hitchhock after rear window of Verticalde Psycho. So after the big three, I think it's Hitchhok's best one. So I wish I could say strangers on a train, but it's not strangers on a train. I wish I could say that, but it's not. The film that I did for me it was hard to say without laughing. It's called God Zilla versus the Sea Monster, and I don't know what it was about that. Maybe because it was just such a strange and weird film or whatever. That was the first one where I decided that I wouldn't just you know put like a writing for I'd also write a bit about it, and I started doing that for films I watched since then. The amount that I write about a film has changed, but over the years, I mean the last you know, fifteen years or so, has been pretty consistent. But if the first few years just getting into it, I think I was the film that really did it to me, that I was interested in actually, you know, try to form an opinion and then keeping a truck of my opinions of what I was watching. I'm glad it wasn't strangers on a train. There would have been both art and well, you know, I kind of feel like it's my movie. I feel like you would have to commit a murder together, if that gets yeah, although I should just mentioned with the hit shock one. Hitchcock was very people for me early on. My Mum introduced with a hit shock, but I was first really getting into films. So even though I have said, you know, God Zilla versus a sea monster, that that would have been when I was maybe thirteen, I was definitely watching hitchhop films as young as ten, bigcause when will ten years old? We went to our Disney land and we saw your universal studios, we saw how they did that tail seat in Subbota and I had since Sabota at that stage. I'd seen psycho rear window north by Northwest Vertigo, so I'd seen the big one. So I definitely see some hit shot by, you know, age ten or eleven. But I guess it was only, you know, when I got into high school that I started to get into more a lot of stuff. Don't want to stuff star ratings. Actually want to have an opinion. Everything I watch makes me watters. Is Hitchcock a director of Children's movies? Then they don't children, I guess very sexual sense to it depends. It depends on the hit shot film. But I think hit shops a good prima for older films because, I guess, or older films, inverted commas or whatever, because that's oftened hard to introduce, but I guess because he was the master of suspense. A lot of it is older films, especially stuff like north by northwest, which is probably the first get shock I saw, is just a very it's a very gripping ride, even though it's not, you know, a sort of modern film, whereas otherwise it's really hard to get. You know, I guess younger people never seen older films before to watch them. I mean when I'm showed films to my students as a teacher, I usually go for comedy, because comedies fail to universal. But in terms of more serious stuff you're something like hit. Shock is a pretty safe word to go to because there's so suspenseful there so thrilling. I don't want to put on something out the Grapes of Rough, which somebody did on the Classic Film Board. It was insisted and showing that to his grand child and like Asto gram child afterwards. What do you think of her? And apparently grand charge was just like Otts, good or whatever. But you know, you don't show it to a ten year old not to introduce them to older films. Yeah, clearly you have to show them good see them movies. That was that the first? Because of the movies you saw, that's one that that was betwegs? I don't think it was. I think I did see the one thousand nine hundred and ninety eight version of God Zilla when it first came out on the eighth chess. I guess it would have been before DVD. So I guess in maybe ninety eight or something I would have seen it, but I've got no memory of it. I haven't raised it an IMDB.

The only stuff I've write and I'm DB've kept truck out of is the film, since God Zilla versus the same monster. But yeah, I did see the role in emeric one when it came out. All right, so love and is your first first measure, like decisive them more spent as on a train or more good enough thing. Well, I don't know if there's a specific film, but was probably closer to Godzilla film. So, like when I was a kid, I like I always liked movies, but I didn't really get into them until my like early teens. So as a kid it was pretty much like every week my dad would go to the video shop and would run a bunch of movies and then we would watch them over the week. So it was just whatever he rented we watched. I had no idea about TV guide movies or I didn't watch movies on TV, so it was just whatever he rented and because he liked Hora, it was always horror films. I don't know if there was a specific movie, though, because I just don't really remember enough about sort of my first films that I watched when I was a kid, but I just know that like, even as like a young kid, like five, four or five, I like I wanted horror films, but we also never watched any foreign films or any black and white films, so I never watched hitchcock as a kid. My first hitchcock was when I was fourteen and I don't think I would have liked it as a kid. And yes, as a kid, I mean I liked them, but I wasn't really hardcore into them until my teens, and I think it was probably what really kind of sparked it off as being like when I knew that this was going to be my passion, was sort of the first few films that I watched when I found the top to fifty, and that was like the godfather singing in the rain, Frankenstein and I want the cookies nest, which instantly became my favorite movie and has been since. So could say maybe it's once over the cookies nest or just kind of all of them and realizing like there's more to film than just whatever my dad rents. It's interesting that you mentioned the Imdbat of fifty, because it was talked about a lot in the first episode, where apparently all the hosts really got into the Imdbat of fifty, which was quite surprising to me because for me, it wasn't a fact of it. We can maybe talk about that a bit later. As for me, my path my hood to to being a celified to movies was, I think, a lot more long winded than you then you're partly because we didn't really watch many movies in my family. Again, some Dasney when I was a child, but that's about it. And then when I was when I was a teen, there were some movies I watched and loved, like Princess Mon Oke and fiction, city of God, stuff like that, but different stuff really. But I never really got into movies, despite as soon as I loved I think in part because I know I'm an obsessive person and if I'm going to get into something, I'm really going to get into it and I'm going to need to explore the history of it and see the classics and all that. I guess we all feel that to a certain degree. But to me it was a tumbling block because I felt that I didn't want to get into cinema because of that right. I didn't have the time or whatever. So really, when I wasn't Teena still did not get into movies and instead I got when I was maybe eighteen into TV because I don't know why. I guess it felt more accessible to watch like the Sopranos and the wire, to watch the big classics, even though, if I think about it, the time it took me to watch all of the Sopranos could have watched hunter movies as well. I mean it's really long either way. And so I got into movies through listening to podcasts, really, because I was listening to TV critics podcasts and a lot of the TV critics really they talk about movies as well, because you know, they're pretty related. And so eventually had led me to film podcasts like film spotting and stuff like that, and eventually hearing about those films that were going on, I want to watch them as well. And all of this is quite recent compared to you, because two thousand and fifteen would really be the big year when I got into movies, I would say. And if there was one thing to single out, it would probably boyhood, which is not it's a in my love but not in on my top twenty of our time right, but I think I do love do I haven't seen it since then and yeah, seeing that it's I guess it makes sense that coming from loving TV. I would love boyhood because it has kind of the same strength of being this very long term character study right where you see a character evolved, which is kind of what the appeal of long TV shows, character based TV shows are. And so yeah, I guess. I guess that was the triggering thing for me. And also the other thing that attracted me to it is the idea of being part of the conversation, like everyone was talking about that film at that point, all as it felt like it, and so yeah, I wanted to be part of that. And then immediately, because of what I discussed earlier, I started watching all the films, watching a big classics, like again, you mentioned the Godfather. That I saw too one that time. So yeah, I guess I came into movies a Lo later then you...

...guys did. And to jump back on the imdbit up to fifty thing. Really it was not a big factor for me, I think, because because I came into the movies, as I said I did, I guess I had heard about it not earlier and mostly derisive right, mostly for people to say, Haha, the idea of the showshare conduction is the best film of all time. That's ridiculous. That's what I heard anyway. What or not agree is another question. I think it's fine, I guess. But yes, so for me the end bit of hundred and fifty was not really a big source, and I guess because in the previous episode it was talked about it. But I wonder what's it for you guys, the end of it to fifty? For me I was never interested in. I'm the beat up to fifty and never occurred to me as something I was particularly interested in and and to this day I'm still a really interested in. And this is perhaps a shocking confession considering the websites that I know we all go too, but I'm not really interested that much in movie lists. I never felt the need or the interest in completing a movie list. Certainly don't dislike them as a reference point for finding movies, but I they're really been into lists, and that is a shocking revelation. I guess that's not when list for you, but yeah, I do love, love, my sense some lists its movies are other ways. So, like Adam, the IMDB top to fifty wasn't a big starting point for me because, you know, I got into film before you and I discovered the Internet. So you know, after I went beyond what was listed in the TV guides for films, I actually went and found some cinema guys a library, and the one that really struck me the most was their Hollywell's film guide, because it also massive. It covered so many films of so many different eras. And the only way I actually found IMDB would be when I was about thirteen and one of the films that I was looking for wasn't listed in the Hollywell's film Guide and anyway I could find information about it was by searching for online, which brought me to IDB the film. When I searched for what IMDB, I didn't even recognize it because on IMDB the title is she says she's innocent. The title of the film that I had on Vhs was called violation of trust and it took me a few minutes to realize that that was an AKA title and it being retireded for video release. So I haven't seen that film in twenty one years. It's not even um I even have voted for an IMDB because it's before I created an account there. I'm not surprised that Lauren, other people haven't heard of it, because I hadn't heard of it. It was just one that I madge too, I don't know, pick up from on VHS. Yes, it's a nine one TV movie. It's got no significance other than the fact that it directed me to IMDB. That's most famous thing that film was ever done for. Anyone is gets solder IMDB. Some of the movies great. I'm sure I should add that as a trivia item on the film's IMDB page, and the shrimy island would actually be accepted because of the way that automated everything. So if I really wanted to bash, if you really wanted to trash the IMDB website, I could do that, but I know better things to do. Yes, I know the IMDB top to hifty. Are already been looking at the three and four staff films on the Hollywell's film guide. That's had of been choosing what to watch. The I'd be IMDB top to fifty was interesting, but it wasn't too interesting because there are a lot of very new films in there and I already knew quite from early on that this wasn't a very good reference point. So I mean occasionally it was interesting or something Su I didn't realize was in the top to fifty, but the films towards the top, and especially the new Royce that kept getting in there high enough. It just was never an interesting launching point for me. And, like Adam, lists are interesting to me. But I've never been much of a completist. I mean that's what I like about I see him. Might check movies that are you can get an award for getting fifty percent or seventy five percent on a list, because don't really you know, my interest point. You know, I'm not interested in completing everything. I don't know if it's coming from the point of view that I don't want to run out of things to see. That might be it, I'm not sure, but I've never had any interest in finishing or completing lists, and even with director filmographies, with directors that I like a lot, like Cronenberg. You know, it took me quite a few years to actually get through everything that he done because you know, you always, you know, want something else there. But you know sometimes with people like the comb brothers, you just end up watching everything. That's also great. But yeah, I've never really been big into list completion or filmography completion, although I know that's one of the big things, that people on the form interested in it, and it breaks Lauren's heart, but you know, it's a reality for me. I guess I'm not that much other completest easier, probably more than you. I do think some satisfaction at getting virtual awards on ICM and stuff like that. But yeah,...

...yeah, it's not a huge dude for me either. But I did immediately use a lot of lists when I got into movies and the way I would do it I think I found I check movies relatively early and so it was always more I check movies than IMDB from me, and I would take a bunch of lists. I think the MDB to fifty was part of it, to be fair, but you also had like they should pick us on day and the pun door winners and stuff like that. I don't remember older lists, and that would just randomize right. So that's how I ended up watching some not the biggest classics first. I mentioned on the good episode that the first film by Good Eyes saw was Nimi, who do, and that's that's why. That's because it came up randomly and I hope that was a way to kind of be exposed to a bunch of different things without just doing the classics. And there was a waiting system. I mean whatever, it's Bolling, but so that the classics would come up more often stead right, so so that I wouldn't just watch obscurities. That's Adam. You said you're not a told into this, so I guess I wonder. How did you decide which films to watch when you first got into it? My formative influence was my father, you know, I think after seeing strangers a train, I just I bugged him for movie recommendations. I think I drove them a little bit crazy and at some point he ran out and just got a little frustrated with this constant demand for new movies. And and the movies you're suggesting where, I guess you could say sort of stereotypical guy cinema, male cinema, if you want, a lot of Westerns, a lot of war movies, a lot of spy movies. Funny thing is that's not his taste at all anymore. He's changed quite a bit and I've changed quite a bit, but my favorite movies in my youth were movies like h planes drifter, which is still one of my favorite movies, the James Bond movies. There was a point when I was probably, you know, eight years old, where the spy who loved me was my favorite movie, which I find a little mortifying today. And then there is this classics, these war movies like the guns of never own, where eagles there, stalic seventeen. I still love these movies and I think they hold up very well to my eyes today as an adult. But those were, those are sort of the movies I just I just adored as a kid and and I was, you know, fairly obsessed even at a young age. I remember I had a sort of weekend routine. Friday evening I'd go to the video store, I'd ran two movies. I'd watch one Friday evening, I'd watch one Saturday morning. Saturday I go back to the video store and repeat it. Two more movies, one in the one watch one Saturday evening, watch one Sunday morning. So I try to consume four movies during the weekend and and I don't think that's very exceptional considering the the movie consumption rate it our forum. I think you won't find many ten year olds who do that. So it was it was. It was mainly my father who influenced me in terms of the movies I was choosing. Yeah, and that leads me to ask. It sounds like you were mostly watching on TV, essentially either by renting DVD's all by watching something that was Owen and so you mentioned TV guy being this important thing. So did you all get into movies mostly by watching them on TV? What about you know when, for example? So I very rarely watched TV. So I'd pretty much never watched any films on TV. It was purely whatever we rented from the video store. And Yeah, like Adam, as a kid, my dad was the main influence on what I watched. But then in two thousand and five, and I was about fourteen, I found the top to fifty. Actually joined IMDB the year before, but somehow I must have found the top to fifty and started watching that. But unlike everyone else, I didn't even know about film books or film critics or anything. So I never I never knew of any critics, I never read any reviews or I didn't know what was popular. I didn't know what the classics were. So top to fifty was literally the only thing I knew in terms of recommendations for films that I should watch rather than films my dad chose to rent. And I love lists and completing lists, although it usually takes me a long time, and I guess it's the same sort of reason. Even though I've tried to to read critics and and look at these books and things like that, I just haven't found anyone that I like really connect with, like taste wires. They don't seem to watch films the same way that I do or like films the same way that I do. So for me, lists are kind of like especially like you know, there's big aggregate kind of lists where it's not just one person saying this is what you should watch. It's kind of just like here's a bunch of films that lots of people like and you might like them as well. So I just have this sort of like pick of the litter. Like to me, it's like random, but it's not as random as just like actually picking something at random, and it's a lot more even not still hit and miss. It's a bit better as a recommendation system than what I used to do, which was go to the horror section at the video shop and pick something with a cool cover, because ninety percent of the time it sucks. So the list of just kind of helpful for me to sort of guide my way, but that's just because I haven't really found...

...any film people whose recommendations like mean enough to me to use that. Yeah, so I guess you, you all really have that connection to like video stores and and watching on TV. I guess, probably because I got into movies as an adult at a time where video stores were already kind of a thing of a past. I mean they still exists, but more where. It was mostly going through the theater, especially, especially starting in late two fifteen, and, yeah, watching films on the Internet and perhaps less than legal ways, which I don't do as much now. So yeah, I guess the difference in time really made a huge difference in in what we watch, because because of that it was kind of an infinite amount of possibilities for me. So I didn't really go. You mentioned not finding critics that you can really trust in you really have the same taste. I don't think I have that either. I guess I just kind of look at an aggregate and try to pick all that sounds interesting because a bunch of different people like it. One other thing I kind of wonder about is Adam, you mentioned that your father mostly introduced you to very masculine type of films and that now your taste is very different, and so I guess my question is, how did that happen right? How did you branch out? How did you explore things that were outside of that of that group? That's a good question. I want to be Clara. I don't draw caricature of my father at all. His tastes are varied and wide, as are my mother's, and they both been influential. You know, beyond just sort of the the war movies, the Western movies, I was watching all of hitchcock. I sort of one through as much hitchcock as was possible once I saw strangers in a train. I did get into the marks brothers movies at a certain point in the Chaplin Movies, and I think I'm guessing that was more my mother's influence and her recommendations to me. And then at high school my taste broadened out a bit. I remember going to high school and my history teacher delightfully dedicated several class sessions to just having us all watch a Geara, the wrath of God which which was mind blowing for me when I was thirteen or fourteen years old. So then I got, you know, watched a bunch of herd song movies. Moreover, there was a a fine arts club at school that decide to show a film festival of Kubrick movies. So I got into Kubrick and then I created my own movie club in high school. It wasn't a very active club Um, but we did occasionally screen movies. I particularly remember was the tradition at the end of the year the the freshman class have a trip to six flags, which is, you know, an amusement park with roller coasters, and I set up an alternative end of year day which would just be a movie day and we go to school and watch movies. And I can tell you most people chose six flags over hanging out with me watching old movies. But I remember our line up on that day was half baked stoner comedy. It was the Godfather, and what was the third one? I can't recall. I think it must have been a can brothers movie. So so gradually my tastes and interests brought him down. So so it sounds like a your initiation, I guess into it. Two movies. was very social. You know who. Movie Clubs and I guess your father. That's that's it are different. But for me it was a very lonely thing. I guess maybe a little sad. I guess I wish I had probably had access to him close but not at a time where they would have interested me much. And Yeah, so what about Lohan and soul? How did you win shout out of the things that interested you at first? Like Lowen, you mentioned the NDBAT top fifty. Obviously, now, from what I know of you, your tastes are not really along those lines. Right. So how did you really get into Genre Cinema? But that was well before I found the top to fifty that I was into horror from when I was like a toddler. So for me the top to fifty was a way of branching out of what I was interested in. But a horror and genre films in general still like my go through. The still my main interest and there's still I'm going to still have the still pretty hit in mis for me, but I feel like I'm more likely to find something worthwhile and then some random top to fifty film, although the ones I have left I don't think I'm gonna like and I don't think that my taste of really change significantly. Like the stuff I watched as a kid is still pretty much the stuff I watching now, like horror and sci Fi. But the certain things that I could tolerate as a kid that I can't tolerate now, like that over overly melodramatic music, I like it actually hurts me. But otherwise I feel like I still I still feel like I'm pretty random with what I like and dislike, like I've always drawn towards genre films, but in everything else it's like I might like a really long slow film, I might like a really fast based Superhero movie, I might hate them, I just never know. So I feel like my taste of just kind of the just wibberly wobbly, and they always have been.

I've always been into horror. Not so much horror films, but when I was growing up I was rearing a lot of our goose bumps and fear street, a lot of our El Stein books, so I was always into horror and I guess that naturally transferred over to horror cinema. And like Lauren, I'll go to the horror section. I'll look for the most striking front covers and the most striking back covers. Could look at the images in the back also make a decision based on that because obviously, when, obviously, but I didn't take my hut, I was film guide into the Horror Section with me to the video library. Maybe I shouldn't, but I didn't. So it was just based on the front carver. I do what attracted me. But yeah, that's how I was getting into film and, you know, sort of like I guess, a bit envious of mature there's been able to watch films directly online ever since it was into cinema, because, yeah, that wasn't a thing for me back in the day. I mean when I was first, first watching films and first, you know, even as like a ten year old going through trying to find films. That was before DVD's had come out and you know, I still I remember hiring my first DVD and how it how different that was to watching a film on VHS. But yeah, for me it was all about VHS, those about hunting those vhs has down and hoping, you know, they work properly, and I just recall such things, as you know, going and renting them. MALTI's Falcon for the second time, but you know, not like one week after another, but like I rent it and I wanted to rewatch it like two years later, and the person I looked it up and they're like, you know, you've rented this film before. I'm like yeah, I want to see it again, but you know, that was like way back that I can't even imagine doing that now. But you know, I guess going back, you know, eighteen years ago or whatever that would have been, you know, that was reality. You want to see something, you need to rent it. I mean much of the films that I first saw growing up were the ones that were showing on TV, because I was only allowed to rent films during the school holidays. So I've wanted to see anything that my parents didn't own, and we didn't really own much, you know, during the week or during the weekend, I would just have to choose from what I was showing them TV. So I saw a lot of old British comedies because they used to play on the ABC channel here. And Yeah, I saw a lot of different classics because they would show them from time to time. But you know, I was watching them with ads, which is an ideal, but it's still a great, you know, Prima for getting interested in films and getting in there it. And then they would give me ideas about what to rent when the school holidays came up and I was able to go rent things. But yeah, things have come such a long way since then because, you know, got to the point where their just has got whited out and I got this gigantic two thousand collection of vhs tapes because I all got them for like a dollar or two dollars when the video libraries were dropping them out, and then getting those converted to dvd over the years, like to not converted, upgrading DVD's over the years. And now it's got to the stage where ninety percent of what I watched I'm streaming online. So everything for me is changed quite a bit. I think I've lost trouble what the question was. I think it was in terms of finding or how my taste has evolved. Yeah, a lot of it is probably by being able to access things and streaming services. I think it's probably a big thing, or being able to import stuff from overseas, so not being limited by what I could rent in a video library. All Limited by what was shining one TV but actually going on. So, you know, I actually want to, you know, buy these films from overseas. I want to buy these films an Ebay that somebody else has imported from overseas or the last few years going out and streaming and going will like Japan's doing a lot of crazy films. I like crazy films. For this Japanese change that we're going to have on the ICM forum in May, I'm going to stream as much stuff as I could find on Amazon prime or on Netflix or whatever, which you know, fits in the broad definition of crazy films beyond the actual Japanese classics. So I'm not quite sure of that. So the question about going a bit old truck, but you'll welcome to redirect me if on a redirection. I have a question for you, Saul, and a question for everyone. It's interesting you mentioned that your parents only let you rent movies during the school holidays and I'm wondering if other people had an experience of what extent their parents restricted their movie watching. I've heard from people over the years. Whenever people meet me, they quickly learn I'm into movies and then often hear how they got got into movies or to what extend they're interested in movies, and often hear about something like my parents didn't let me watch many movies going up or we weren't really a family that watched movies. So I had the opposite experience. My parents didn't restrict me at all in terms of watching movies. There's only one movie I can ever remember then saying you shouldn't watch that, and was the deer hunter, because I remember as a child asking my father what was the best movie he'd ever seen and he said the deer hunter and I said I want to watch that, and I think I was probably nine years old, and they said, why don't you wait a few years? So that...

...was the only time that ever experienced them restricting me from watching a movie. Otherwise sex violence. They didn't feel a need to restrict me from that. And I'm wondering if other people had parents who are similarly, you know, liberal, or were more restrictive. No, on you is always actually a pretty good, talented. What about Russian Roulette? Okay, so that's a different to joke. You look, my parents are think whatever sure restrict to are. While I was watching I don't know they when I was running films out, you know, for a while. You know, they didn't really want me work what renting anything out which was m a or are, which are the two highest classifications. But you know, well, the time I was ten or eleven years old, you know, the pretty much let me rent whatever I wanted to rent. In terms of being able to watch films. Yeah, renting films was a school holiday thing or was or special thing for the holidays, but they'll pretty much let me watch whatever was showing on TV and they couldn't really control it to much of an extent, you know, unless you in the same room with me and they could go over and turn something off. But, you know, them home by myself or whatever it's showing on TV, I guess. Yeah, I didn't really think too much of it. So I don't think I was ever really restricted too much. I do remember one time when we will staying in Marin drew, which is a city near here, and were on holidays and one of the in house ort to quarter our inner room movies or whatever was rated M A. I suggested we watch it and they'll like no, but I would have been you know. You know, I guess maybe ten or eleven at the time. So it maybe that was a sensible decision, but you and I don't look. I don't think I've really been restricted too much in terms of the content of the films. It's more so that, you know, we're not going to drive each of the really video store and, you know, spend so much money or whatever. I'm renting these films. If you want to watch something, you know, watch what's on TV. Yeah, I wasn't. I didn't have any restrictions. Basically, like I was allowed to sort of do whatever I want, whenever I wanted. The only restriction that I had with movies was that I wasn't allowed to watch our rated horror films and like everything that I wanted to rent was basically like read it M Orma. So I had to bring my parents every single time and they had to take out the films because I was too young. But, like, I remember specifically my parents were like, you can't watch the evil dead and you can't watch a nightmare ELM street, and I did manage the manage to convince them to let me watch the Evil Dad and I was seven, and then I cried and so then they were like okay, you're definitely not watching a nightmare in elm street now, but I remember, like it's by by a few years after that, when I was like ten, I was just watching like everything. They never really cared. I remember watching irreversible with my dad and what's that other one? I standalone or something like that. So good family time with my family. It's interesting you guys talk about about ratings. Obviously we have them in the US as well, but it would be generous to say that they're strictly enforced. At the video store. They never, you know, prevented me from renting anything I wanted. And and movie theaters in New York City. In my entire life I only once was prevented from seeing an r rated movie as a child. They seem to have a policy of why turn away good money, which I appreciate. Yeah, they're they're very strictly reform enforced here. I'm not sure so much sure about video libraries, but cinemas they're very strictly enforced. I remember that I want free passes through this local television station to see monsters ball, the hollyberry film, and that would have been early two thousand and two probably. So I was maybe I'm around fifteen years old and it was rated are and the person it was something the tickets or second sticker person said. You know, they actually get the personal fine, not the theater. The person who sells the ticket gets a personal fine if they let a minor into an r rated film. So might just be for the oars. And not sure if it's about the EMA's, which is our second highest song, which is fifteen plus. I know they're not allowed to sell them. I'm not sure if the finds quite the same. In terms of renting, I'm not quite sure how much of any issue it is. I know with M, which is our third heights, it's owning, you know, recommended for mature audiences. So you know pretty much anything GPG or M. I think you're able to rent as long as you've got, you know, somebody else with you. So I never went to the video library by myself because it was never close enough to so I always had a parent there anyway. But we have felt if I was to rent out an ar by myself, I probably wouldn't be allowed to. And Yeah, I wasn't allowed to see in our film by myself and as and changed either because I was also on the radio recent there's some one of those stupid blockbuster films that have come out recently. I don't know what it was where they're talking about of whatever. I'll try and take, you know, the fifteen year old kid along to see it or whatever, and they weren't able to sneak them in. So it is quite strictly enforced here. But yeah, it's I'm sorry, go ahead, Laine. Sorry you're just going to...

...say like I tried to rent, think it was an m or an m a film and I was thirteen or fourteen and they would just like no, you need a parent and my mom was waiting in the car, so to go out and get her and come back in and she had to take it out for me. And Yeah, my dad brought me and my brother to see scary movie, which I think came out two thousand and one, so I would have been ten, and the people were trying to stop him from like taking us in. They were like no, this is like really scary, like I think they're too young, and my dad was like Naw, and like it wasn't even scary anyway. But yeah, and I remember. I think I went to see like jackass, but we went with a family friend and they wouldn't let us in because he wasn't our parent. So we could say it. Oh, it's quite the opposite experience from what I was used to in New York. Much you. I'm interested in hearing if you had similar restrictions as you. They know you said you're only really go into movies when you were older, but did your parents restrict anything that you saw when you were young? Well, not that I was aware of, obviously, because I wasn't that much into movies. It wasn't a big factor why I did. It's not like I was trying to see films. That's maybe would not have been appropriate. But also the other factor is I have five older siblings and so I don't think they were very restrictive with them either on that subject. None of them were hugely into movies, but they did in some phases. And I guess like my brother should be beene fiction, but I was like thirteen or fourteen, but it was not. I was at an age it was okay for that. So yeah, they were not restrictive, but yeah, I guess I guess just did not come up that much. And on the subject of ratings. I guess we have a slightly different system where it's just ages. Right, there's minus ten. Well, not under ten or sorry, age only under wait, not my saying, yeah, not under ten, not on your twelve and not under sixteen. And then there's a guess, an equivalent to and see seventy. That's x rating. That's basically porn and gas pernoway films, which I know that Lord is appout be from a guest pardoway family. But yeah, that is the only case recent gas pernway films that had issues with with ratings in front. Generally they are little more lible than the American system with sex. Do not that level again, like love, the gaspinder way film was deemed an x rated film, and they're a little tougher with violence. Right, so most superhero things are minus ten sometimes when US true anyway. But yeah, I don't think they're very strict with it in theaters and fronts. Obviously I don't have an experience of trying it myself. In fact, I remember that hearing about the exorcists. Obviously it was not in theaters, but I knew it was a minus twelve film and I heard about it. I was eleven and I remember being pretty happy that I could use that as an excuse not to see it. So that's what I was. I was as a kid, right. So not not, not, not the kid. You did it to restrict in terms of trying to see stuff. That's true. Adults, but I guess, since I guess we talked about this a bit, but since you all got into movies more through the DVD's and stuff, what a point where you started going to the cinema biggul early all? Well, I guess maybe, maybe unifited, because it's interesting that all of our first memories, well, not all, but I guess a lot of all those memories of thin eated to the cinema because of just the it's very striking, right as a child, to be in in that big doc cool. Yeah, I want did you at some point start really going to the cinema? We good early, or is it for you still mostly watching at home? I guess. Well, my too. You. I think you just betrayed the fact that you've come to the cinema rather recently by saying that we all gotten into it through DVD's. I think we all got into it through VHS. Actually, we're so the VHS era, which no longer exists, for better or worse, or children are the video store era, which no longer exists. For Worse. I very much miss and loved video stores. But but I want to be clear. Wouldn't say I got into movies through VHS. It was not one or the other. It was both, both video stores and going to the movies. And I don't know what what the situation is where you guys grew up, but I was so very fortunate to grow up in New York City, which has just unbelievable bounty of movie theaters, so many movie theater showing recent releases, but also movie theater showing international movies and Art House movies and and repertory cinemas, and so my family were over he's big movie hours and I benefited from the fact that both my parents are cinephiles as well. We always went to movies and it's only really in the past ten years that I've stopped going to the movies nearly as much, and especially, I think, once I got I remember I was eighteen or seventeen, excuse me, and I was just about to graduate from high school and a new repertory cinema opened up here in New York called the Thalia theater. There's actually a recreation of an old repertory cinema that had closed and they opened with a series of classic French movies, and so I went there and I saw all...

...these classic French movies like Reef Efee Diabalique, the sorrow and the pity, the screech charm of the bourgeoisie. So that was was was a fascinating experience and that got me more into movies and opened my eyes to a whole new sort of sector of cinema. And then I continue doing it a lot. When I got back from college. I went to all these sort of these repertory cinemas. Had A membership at film forum. I knew how to how to sneak into the Museum of Modern Art and go to their repertory cinema for free. And then I became very indulgent and I would make lists every month of all the classic movies showing around the move the city that I wanted to see. So I think the kind of question was about seeing films in fit is and whether it was all just about home video. I think for me it was a lot about home video. Of just been discussing the chat and just even the Smith and a texture of VHS. You know, I just love I've still got but a few films and Vhs, even though my BCI isn't cooked up. In the new place that I moved into, I got all the V hs has of stuff I would been up a were upgrade and just brings back childhood memories. You know, that's my fondest thing, going and wandering through the video store looking at films, judging them based on their cover, because that's a little I could do and, you know, sometimes getting a really cool thing as a result of that. So a lot of it was discovery from me that way. Along of it was discovery of things showing light not on TV, a lot of the older classics. In terms of going to the movies, yeah, that's probably always been an issue for me in terms of distance and expense. For quite a while I was living, for like the last ten years or so quite far away from any theaters. I'm actually a bit closer to a cinema now, but even so it's not, you know, my number one avenue to go and watch films. There was definitely a time when I was at university where I actually would watch films quite regularly because the university that I was out was actually quite close to a cinema that's now shut down and being transformed into a live theater or something of that sort. It hasn't been completely shut down but it's not what it was. But yeah, I used to like go there because I don't have like a lecture in the morning and I'd something in the evening or whatever and run or I've been in a film in between. So that was kind of Nice for a little bit. And there was one stage, I guess maybe two thousand and five, thousand and six, where I was really into discussing the last releases on the IBB message boards, so I'd go out and see, you know, as many of those as I can by myself during the Oscar bars season. But in general I don't think going to the cinema has been a big part of it. It's always something I enjoy. I like, like I said, you know, I do still like wandering up to that big screen like a little kid and looking at that big screen saying how massive it is and just oh environmental it. But yeah, you know, is the vast it seems. As a cinephile, you know the actual cinema experience. You know, it's never been as big for me as home video and watching things on TV, which is probably why is discussed in a Netflix podcast. I'm not so apprehensive about cinemas eventually shutting down, everything being streaming services. I just see this evolution. That would break my heart. So, like you, I also had that sort of sense of wonder when going into a movie theater as a young child. That just felt like a sort of monumental special place. So I would dearly miss movie theaters, even though I don't go to them then off and anymore. Yes, I never really got into the cinema. When I was a teen. I went a lot more because dad again would be like, Oh, let's go see this latest release and he would bring us, and that was probably between two thousand and three and two thousand and eight ish, and that's sort of when I graduated high school. And then I was sort of doing stuff on my own most the time of stuff that was playing at the cinema didn't want to see, and also with the Australia. Back in the day, our release times for films would be like months later than say, America. So by the time something was available illegally online, it would it was still not be out in the cinemas here. So it was like well, I'm not going to wait three or four months to see this film. And it just wasn't like a great selection. I always wanted to pick what I wanted to see and not have like you can choose from these ten films at these specific times, because I don't know if I'm going to want to feel like that. I feel like watching that at that time. So yeah, I think as a as a team, we probably went a couple times a month and now the last few years I go maybe a couple times a year, and the only time I really make an effort to go as if there's a horror festival around, because otherwise I'm just not really very interested. And if I can watch it at home where I'm comfortable, don't have to put on clothes, caning pores and whatever, then I'm going to watch it at home. Might just mention that I actually have, until covid hit started, going to the cinema more regularly become part of, you know, my weekly or by weekly routine,...

...just because, you know, living away from home or whatever. It be a timer. I could catch it with my parents whatever meal and would go see a movie together. When covid had shot cinemas down. That's sort of you know, died off little bit and you know it's been a few times we have gone out and we've seen something like we saw no mad land together and some other stuff that appealed to them. But yeah, you know, I've been so the COVID closures. You know, I was actually going maybe once every two or three weeks to the movies with my parents just use they're a catch up thing. So that's sort of you know, came in on the game maybe the last five years or so. Those their play a good period after, you know, I guess graduating the uni, where I just really wasn't going to the movies that much. They so. So I ask this question because for me, probably as a result of being adults or young adult, when I got into films, I was a student in young which is pretty big city. It's so I had access to a lot of movie theaters that were showing a lot of different films. I wasn't really seeing that many older films. They did once a week come to movie they call it, but culturally just being old, so I would see a saw a few hitchcocks that today for the first time. That way the check. For me, it was really important, and you might even argue that part of why I watched a lot of classic films or or the films was in order to have a better understanding of cinema and to be able to have a more informed opinion of current films. But I guess because there's this thing in Fort in fronts, where I've talked about this before, where cinemas of basically a monthly for a monthly fee, you get to see whatever, however, however many films you want in a certain chain of theaters. So yeah, I really wanted to be part of the conversation, have have an idea of what the current films become good things are. And Yeah, it again started watching all the things in big path to understand and to have a mind firmed opinion. And what you guys mentioned about covid and Adam, about suddenly having access to a lot of small theaters doing all the films, it's actually what I'm doing right now because, as of this recording, cinemas have reopened since two weeks three weeks here in France and now I live near Palace and really this period of theaters being closed has made me really fear that all of these small theaters that still exist would disappear, and they haven't, and so I know I'm really, really enthusiastic into watching these older things in theaters. It's really invigorated my desire to go see them and I've done it. It's a bit and to take a to take this opportunity and in that sense I guess the closure of the mass has made the hardcore funder from me. Something that I thought of probe into and see whether it's a case for anyone else. I know it's the case for Lauren at least, is whether you've done any extra study in film and how that's changed your appreciation, because the first degree that I did before education actually was in film and video and definitely some of the lectures and some of the courses that I did, some of them a bit reluctantly, did it deeper in my appreciation and widen my scope of what I was into. So I'm just wondering how that lot have changed for anybody else. Well, I already mentioned, you know, seeing some movies in high school in class like a gear of the wrath of God, which is very influential. But in terms of more sort of formal academic experiences, I took one class in college on film. It was not a college where you could take film production or really major in film is a course of study, but I took one class and it was a class where I definitely learned some things in terms of cinematic terminology and cinematic techniques. I learned about you know, I learned terms like a two shot or a match cut. These were things I learned about. Upon the whole, I did not like that class very much, as is all too common among university lecturers, I found the the professor's highly pompous and thus not very informative. But then in Grad school I became much more more involved in studying film because I went to to Grad school to study history with a focus on on film. I want to be clear. I didn't go to study film history. It wasn't a a degree in film studies. It was a degree in history with an interest in American cultural history and and especially American cinema. So when I was there I began studying film much more heavily and reading a lot of film history, not just in terms of history movies. Were reading the history of cinematic culture. I read a book, for example, about traveling exhibitions that that went to small towns in America and the early nineteen hundreds. or I remember reading in a great article...

...about the popularity of there was a certain type of film exhibition, and I'm talking about, you know, one thousand nine hundred and four or something, where they would just show a a camera shot from the front of a train and they would be exhibited in small movie theaters that were designed as if you were sitting in a train yourself. This was a small but but popular sort of fat in the cinema experience in the very early days. So that was the kind of of cultural history I was I was learning about and I also took, you know, some classes specifically in film studies. I've very quickly discovered I really wasn't into sort of film studies as a separate academic course of study. I think that's where you get much more theoretical and any can tends to get much more pompous. But there was there was a lot to learn and I very much enjoyed learning about it. So I also studied history, but again because I can to cinema that relates. I didn't really take those courses into film history or into the culture of cinema as related to history, because when I really got into films I was already just just barely postgraduates and at that point I was very focused on passing an exam, which is an exam in the two pass to teach informs, and so obviously that didn't leave any home for really exploing other stuff. I really had to study what was on that exam and yeah, it's a big regrets actually, and kind of would like to do it, but I would never get the time. So or yeah, so, yeah, I did so, but I wish I had. Is My answer. When I was in high school I like really did not ever want to study film. I was like that's it, against it, because whenever we had study, like when we were studying a film in high school, it would be like the teacher would say, okay, these are the themes and the symbolism and whatever, and you have to basically regurgitate everything I just said and we don't really want any of your opinions or your interpretations. It was like stick to this and I was just like yeah, that, that sucks. So it's really really against any kind of academic study of film. But eventually I did go to film school like that was production based in two thousand and two thousand and sixteen, and I've got a diploma of screen and media and it didn't really it didn't really do much on theory, but it really made me realize how much goes into like production, and I mean film students are are terrible, I feel, and school productions are terrible. But there was are so many things I didn't even know about, like things like taking at loss and even like just doing so many multiple takes, like I knew that every scene would have multiple takes of didn't really realize how many or like from so many different types of angles and stuff. That really kind of open my eyes to the actual the nature of production of films, which just hadn't really thought about before. But I hated production. So then I went to uni and I got about shol of Arts and screen studies, which was theory based. I loved that and my lecturers are actually not pompous at all. They were like really good, like they they were the complete opposite of my high school teachers. They were like we you want your opinions, we want you to engage with the readings that were giving you and the topics that were covering, but we want you to, you know, put yourself into it as well. And most of the stuff that we covered, like I already sort of knew, but it helped me like contextualize a lot of it. It also made me realize it will look into like different aspects of film that I wouldn't have before, like, say, tying it into philosophy and psychology and that kind of stuff. Whether I agree with it or not not the point, but I just I didn't realize that the sort of intricacies that were kind of people would use for criticism of films and and reading films. And it did help me with some of the language and sort of putting my thoughts together, but I found so exhausting, which is why I just do like really simple comments now, because I'm not going to I don't feel like getting into one thus hundred word as say for every film. But yeah, really helped me learn that kind of stuff, but in terms of opening up my eyes to different film or seeing in a different way, it didn't do that at all, but did, I guess, help me. I can sort of take a step back and see the film a bit more objectively. It doesn't affect my opinion, but I can kind of sit back a little bit more and think of maybe what they're attempting and it also helped me learn a little bit more about certain parts of history or culture that I didn't know about before either. Yeah, it's very interesting to you guys talk about your experiences. Were learning about film? Like Lauren, I did what was called media in high school, but a lot of it wasn't theory. In fact most of it was and it was more production based like their. Number one thing that I remembered doing is we had to recreate a shot from the opening of a film, and the one that I managed to choose was billy Elliott, which has him jumping up and down, and my best friend, who was doing with me, refuse to jump up and down. People and make him look stupid, so we had to like sort of experiment and get the camera to like move up and down and it was like moving up and down. I had like the sovereign pression of them going through the year. So some early trickery in there, but you're a lot of it was mainly production. When I got into university a lot of it was...

...theory based, but I guess by that stage I found the theory quite interesting. I did theory units as well as production units. The production part, like Lawrence said, was very interesting. was very insightful seeing just how much effort goes into their things. You don't think about like white balancing and making sure you've got a enough reaction shot when you're doing a documentary in case you need to cut away. But yeah, the production side, yeah, was always a little bit taxing for meals very hard working with and coordinating with other people. So I ended up just finishing off the degree by doing theory units, which didn't really end up taking me anywhere, but it gave me quite a wide appreciation for different parts of cinema. Like before university I was never very much into documentaries. I was actually at the stage where I wouldn't like go and see documentaries and cinema like I think only one I'd seen was like boling for Columbine, but beyond that I had like no interest in documentaries. And then I'll shown the films of Frederick Wiseman. I was shown the films of Nicholas Broomfield, where actually puts his personality into the documentary becomes equally about him as it is about the subject. And just seeing different things like Louis Bunuel films beyond earned Shan and Delou, which I think every cinema film box sees early on, but just seeing some other films he's done, like Bel Jue or log door, and really getting into cinema that way. I just found it. Yeah, I had a much wider appreciation by the end of my film. Course, like Lauren said, it did get to the stage where you'd be able to write something quite in depth, and the film reviews that I was writing, I guess towards the end of my film degree, maybe two thousand and sixty thousand and seven, were quite lengthy, like paragraph long reviews, like paragraphs on end, and I just can't do that these days. So, like I don't just do a few words, I usually about a hundred and fifty words, but the stuff that I was writing, I've got some of them saved somewhere and my comp bitter for ages are going. You know, I'd be doing like a five hundred like word essay, basically just posting what I'd seen on Classic Film Board and no it responding to it. I guess it gets to the point where I was like I don't know if it's worth writing all this or whatever. So my analysis has dropped down a little bit since, you know, finishing the film degree, getting into education, fighting my career elsewhere. But it's definitely was a big influence on me and even though I'd seen more than other people, like the lectures or rock and like come up to me and like that came to me, but they would sort of like ask me during a Lection, you know, if I knew about this or whatever, because I had a lot of knowledge there. Did you guys ever consider? I guess it sounds like you you considered having a career in cinematic working in actual cinema, because I never did, maybe because it was later, but yeah, I'm interested in that. Yeah, I thought it would at one point. I mean originally when I left school, I actually started doing law because I got good enough growth to do that and everyone's like, Oh, you're a good public speaker, so you know you should do this or whatever. You've got the great time up to get in so I'm l yeah, okay. So I had to have laws my major and not to have a minor, something else secondary that I was studying also. So I had a decided to a film and Video Unit and even though it wasn't really great compared to what I did my switch, canvass went to different university, it was definitely interesting enough that I decided, look, I don't want to do the law stuff. It's really boring and it's a lot of reading about things that aren't too interesting. How about I switched careers or whatever. I got into film and I originally thought, you know, look, I'll be doing some production stuff, and then I did a production units. Productions really hard because you're working with so many from people, getting so many ideas out there, organizing everything, white balancing everything. It was something I decide I didn't want to a career, and so I thought or maybe again into film theory. I end up doing honors and doing a thesis about a topic that was far less interesting at the end of it than I thought at the beginning of it. And at the end of that I was like yet no, I'm not, I'm not doing this, which is yeah, when I switch to education, but you know, it's kinds come a bit, you know, three hundred and sixty now, because some of the stuff I'm doing now I'm actually our teaching kids how to film. So I'm sort of using that up backing that I had before. But so I am doing stuff at the moment such related cinema, which is quite interesting, but it's not, you know, the production side that I did at one stage thought that I'd be getting into. What is it that you're working on Song? Sorry, kick, can you rephrase that? I'm not sure. You say you're currently working on something. Oh No, you just with the what I'm teaching a students at the moment. I'm actually teaching your film and video or film and video skills or photography and video stills at a primary school level. So it's a specialist position and yeah, actually teach kids about...

...how to make a film out and make a documentary, how to have, you know, reaction shots in there, how to rerecord voices and yeah, it's all quite interesting. So, like what I'd like work at university is sort of like factoring in, because it's actually a part of the primary school curriculum, whereas when I grew up it was just you know, part of the high school curriculum. So yeah, it's quite interesting and you know what I've learned, you know, is still use for me. But it's not what I envisioned when I in bold and university. I thought or maybe actually get out there and make films that would be released as cinemas. But you know, that was the dream and this is the reality, and the reality isn't too bad. I didn't really go into my degree thinking I was gonna get a career in film. I just thought I really love this thing and I want to study it, so I'm going to go study it. While I was there I did consider getting into editing, but then my rside started and I realized like there was just no way that I was going to be able to do that. And then I just realized I hated production, like I yea like soul was saying, like coordinating everything and being on set is like nine percent waiting and it's just it's really boring, it's really physical. It's like a trade and I was just I don't want to do a trade. And then with a theory. I find it really fun, but as a hobby and as an interest, not as like a career like. I couldn't really imagine having like deadlines for writing a film review or a film essay or something like that. I just put bothered with that. But it was just something I wanted to do and I thought, well, I want to learn the board skills from university and I might as well do it studying something I like. Whether it will have any impact on whatever career I end up with, I don't know. I doubt it, but it was still fun to do. For me, I can't say I have a really seriously considered a career in in cinema, except I would say I considered a career in history. I fail them, so it's sort of an academic career. The closest though I ever came was, you know, when I was in when I was a teenager, I went to summer camp. I don't know if summer camp is something that is popular in Australia or France, but it's it's quite popular, the popular here in the northeast United States, and the summer camp I went to had a video production, I don't know, I guess you call it program and that was those a ton of fun. It was it was it was totally free they just gave us kids some video equipment and a very bit it basic editing console and said whatever you want, and we you know, ridiculous things. We had a camp news show. We put together a sort of ongoing murder mystery cereal. We did a lot of satire. We decided to do a satire mashup of forest gump with die hard three. It was called forced dump with a vengeance. It was a very silly endeavor. So that was fun and that influenced me enough that when I was a senior in high school I briefly had an internship and a production company, a very small documentary focus production company called storyville films. They mainly do arts focus documentaries about music or about theater. At the time, the one I worked on they did documentary about a fairly wellknown playwright in the United States named Susan Lauri Park. So that was the one I worked on, the most famous for they had a short documentary that was is nominated for an academy award called Sister Roses Passion. I didn't work on that one, but but do it. Working at that that production company, I quickly realized that I had no interest in working in film production, especially at the lowest levels. It is dreary. It's a lot of waiting around and doing nothing. Most of my time I was doing transcription. I don't know if you guys have done transcription. It is spikingly boring. So now I not river really seriously consider a career in film after that. The most boring thing that I've done on a film was one of the projects were doing was continuity. I think I was continuity and I was set curage where I don't know how I got those things shifted to me and I was trying to do all these small things that have to make it interesting. But you know, you couldn't actually really tell the end of it how I'd put all these different things in the set there, because it was just like so subtle and the continuity was quitey interesting. But you know, the team I was working with rope. So but dad, I think it wasn't really that much to pick up on. As as some of them goes. Adam, we do have those in fronts and but as I was a nerdy kids, so I went to science based some against we did, like pocket said, program video games and stuff like that, but not so much with the the first gun boat is, but it sounds fun to and yes, I never, never considered that. Definitely never consider being involved in production that. That does not sound like I think at all in any way being a critics that would be very fund but stephitely definitely a bit late for that, I think. But I don't know, I guess. But Anyway, I never considered as it considered it as a Kay, you'm all like, like no, and said more as a hobby anyway.

But I want to close on is to ask you, where is your senior figure at at this point? What, what's is still much avating you, if anything, to watch things? Are you trying to close some gaps right, see some blind spots, or you more interested in what's coming out? So you know who what what's is still driving you to see movies at this point? What else would I do with my time? I don't know. I mean it's still it's still something that interests me greatly. I'd say that as I've, you know, become much more indulgent in my cinephilia as an adult, as I've gone from watching maybe, you know, for movies a week to watching seven movies a week, I'd say the the passion I once felt as a child has dimmed a bit and that's unfortunate. I think it's inevitable with any interest. I also think it's inevitable as part of growing older. But the fact that it's still there, that I still watch a lot of movies, not nearly as much as soul or Lauren when she's really going, but I still, you know, watch much more movies than my friends. That that's that's testament to the fact that that, you know, it is such a major passion of mine and I feel like I watch a lot of movies that are disappointing these days, but occasionally you just come across that movie that really deprises and delights you and it's still a magical experience to me. In terms what motivates me now, I've said before with the lists that I check movies that I'm not to you know, passionate about, you know, trying to get platinum awards on them and complete them. What does interest me a lot, though, are the rankings that you get for official checks, and at the moment I'm doing a bit of elape Frog game with Lauren at the moment where she's just above me in the ranks, but I was just above her a few weeks ago before she checked the ton of shorts to try and get ahead of me. So the rankings are do keep me going, but you know, look at in general my you know, I don't know how to describe it, my sense of wonderment with I check movies as like corn down over the years. I don't hold it and quite the same esteem that I once did. So the main thing that really motivates me is probably the official challenges are on the ICM forum, because they give me a focus of what to watch rather than just choosing anything out there. I've got like three different themes that I can choose some each month, and then I get, you know, super competitive when I see other people watching more stuff than me. And we've got an official lead award going on where if you finish in the top five or top ten or top twenty, you get so many points. So that at the moment is doing it for me. I don't know how long it will last for because I'm watching a very large volume of films. You know, since I've joined the ICM forum and got interested in the challenges, I've gone from watching maybe six hundred films in year two one thousand hundred. I watched two thousand and two hundred and thirty during last year. That's feature films, not short so I'm obviously watching a very large volume of it. So I don't know if that's sustainable long term, but at the moment the challenges are keeping me interested. I don't know how long for, but yeah, for the moment you're just that competitive thing, having those set themes, the things changing each month is enough to keep me going. So can I just ask you about that? You know, immification, understand, is a big appeal. I'm certainly not one who looks down on Gammification at I I think it's a lot of fun. There must be something more right. There must be something edifying to you intellectually or spiritually or something you know from the movement was that you get out of them. What the big competition with Lauren is that we're both from our Perth, so I'm trying to be the the Perth user with the highest rank on Icem. In terms of what that does for me, I don't know. I guess not much. I don't really expect people to respect my film opinions more if I'm higher ranked. I don't know. I mean, I'm just saying that because I was something which another user three out a couple of years ago with trying to get in the top twenty five, and I seem so yeah, I'm not sure if it's a spiritual thing or whatever. I guess I enjoy seeing my rank go up, but it's it's also been high because at the same time I've sort of, you know, lost a little bit of faith in the process of the way I check movies as running. I see a bit of the behind the scene stuff and the way that it's become, you know, of your ade selection and it's all about attracting new users and not so much, you know, catering towards the established user base. You know, it's not something that, you know, I'm set and saying, well, this is my goal for life. You know, four years ago it was when I first joined eye checked moves. I'm like, you know, this is going to be, you know, my road, you know, towards you know, watching films for quite a while. So, yeah, I don't...

...know. Maybe it's just like competitive nature. I mean, even with the challenges that we're doing at the moment, you know, if I get the top five gun on top ten. Yeah, I get a few points, it doesn't really do anything for me. So I don't know if it's just the that pleasure of seeing my name in bright lights or whatever if I get a high ranking and one of the challenges. Maybe it's something to do with that. I don't know, to we callse Serotonim or whatever. That's sort of like thing you get when you get like that sort of Ding on your iphone. I don't know if it's like that. I'm not sure. Maybe it's a sense of self satisfaction, but then it's also a sense of you know, how much time am I squandering doing this? So that's my roundabout way of okay, the thing is dopamine. Thank you. French pronunciation. Please helping with my English pronunciation. I'm no good with yeah, it's my round away way of Apts, not answering Adams question. Yeah, lately, I well, over the last few years my obsessions kind of died down. So I just kind of watch stuff when I feel like it. But I was the like number one. I see Emma from Perth since two thousand and nine. So I'm very keen on stopping my nemesis from beating me in the rights at the moment. But like earlier this year I went like three months of that watching a film just because I was pretty stressed with uni, but I just wasn't in the mood and then I just thought I'll start just working on my closest awards and stuff, and then that just like sparked my interest again. I find, yeah, when I start to sort of lose interest, if I start to focus on something, I'll be really into it for a while and then I get bored and then I'll be interested in something else. I just can't stick to sort of one thing. But I do like to have a focus when I'm watching film. But even if I'm not watching films, quite like just reading about film. I never used to, but then when I was shore mentioned this in another podcast, but when I was starting to gather lists and reviews for they shoot zombies, I got really into like reading what other people were saying about films, and before that I was kind of just like I don't care. So now, like, even when I'm not watching, I'm always reading or listening or something like. I'm I'm always doing something film related. It doesn't just have to be watching it for me. So that's kind of where I'm at. I guess I just kind of like, if I feel like it, I'll watch stuff and if not, I'll read stuff about you much. You well, in terms of the ICM when kings, I don't care to about it, but that's probably just because I'm not even in the same galaxy of you guy as you guys as it's easier not to care when you're losing, probably, but yeah, that's that's not really any goal. I guess to me, the the thing that what you based me in life for most things is to try to understand the world, to get a better understanding of it. That's why I'm studied history and geography, and film for me, is another way to do that. It's also a way to detain myself, of course, but you know, I guess that's the primary thing. And there's also and so I'm always trying to get a better understanding, but of the medium and of other cultures. Other Times, Ettutera. One of the things that's going on currently is that for me is that I got into film mostly through English based media, English based lists and critics, etc. And so I noticed at some point that's when I read or listen to French critics. They would treat some films as being these very big deal films that basic basically don't register for English critics or American critics. And so lately I've been trying to kind of demot diligent about watching many French classics, but in the long term the goal is to kind of deep everywhere. I kind of have a more global and more universal knowledge, which is obviously impossible, but trending towards that of cinema and I'm still really into new releases, I think more than than most people participating in this podcast, or be this particular one or the previous ones. Yeah, I really really enjoyed being into what is being talked about now, because that's the way to connect with people who are not, that's much into movies, because they hear about the big things like so you mentioned nomadlands right, seeing that having an opinion about it is also a way for me to interact with people, which I find they enjoyable. So yeah, that that that's would be where I'm at and I think with that we can and this episode. So thank you for listening and join us again soon. Oh and if you thought I could go one episode with out at least making a cameo appearance. You'd be quite wrong, and just remind everyone that this is indeed a follow up to our very first episode of all time, how we got into cinema, where all of the original hosts shared our entry way into the world of cinema. For anyone interested in comparing these episodes and seeing who did better, was it the original or was it indeed the remake? Go back to our very...

...first episode and find out for yourself and, of course, drop by the Forum and tell us which she prefer and how you got into cinema. You have been listening to talking images, the official PODCAST OF ICM FORUMCOM.

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