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Talking Images

Episode 44 · 4 months ago

We Need to Talk About How Omicron (1963) is Profiting From Covid

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In our Season 2 finale of Talking Images, we look at how after 2 years of the Pandemic something good may be coming out of it after all - extra exposure for the 1963 sci-fi comedy Omicron.

This "body-horror" meets satire, explores humanity in all its bodily functions, and offers an eerie and still extremely relevant and sobering assessment of the world we live in.

You are listening to talking images, the official podcast of ICM Forumcom. Well, love everyone, and welcome to our second ever season finale of talking images. We have been on for two full years now, covering a total of forty four episodes, not counting our glorious pilot. What the ride it has been. It feels like just yesterday we recorded our first season finale, though our wish for a Covid free twenty twenty one clearly did not come through. So, guys, Ha, how are you? How are you holding up? Hi, is some. I'm holding up okay. Here in the UK things have been gradually getting back to normal, but we're still a bit ware of how it's going to pun out over the coming weeks for the Christmas season. So we get to see how that is. But things are looking a bit better than the way last year, let's put it that way. What about the soul partings going in Australia? Yeah, look in Australia's Dif from different sides of the country on my son the country, we've been pretty normal. For one I think pretty much the whole of two thousand and twenty one has been mask free. Other than a couple of smiling breakouts, mask free life carrying on like usual. The only differences we've shot ourselves lot in the rest of the country and that's annoying. Some people says now push to reopen. So two thousand and twenty one has been much like two thousand and twenty minimal social distancing, minimal limits on venues, no mask wearing in general. But they're in two thousand and twenty two and looks like we're going to have to go back to wearing masks and limits everything else the rest of the world is doing, because there was a gigantic push to open up the borders and to let the armor Crown variant into Western Australia, which is very interesting and I guess this makes it a very time to do a podcast on on the Chron Oh yeah, I guess you can say that. For sure, I have, but I'm not sure what thever that pigty bones. I think I just prefer to live in my little bubble and not have to worry about it, because here it's been masks arm it since it's dark and essentially we had nine months straight of masks on, even outside I who were walking, walking in the forest, and then they were gone. While summer, it's fine, and now the masks outside, they're coming back. So hop yeah, it's going to be an interesting two and twenty two. Let's bit like that for everyone, I think. But one thing for sure, though, whatever happens, talking images will continue. So never fearlessness will be coming on and bringing you these podcasts in mother what happened in two thousand and twenty two? Yeah, exactly. And if we get there, more extreme look down, so might even get more episodes from that perspective, as supposed. Really is...

...a bit of a Christmas present, and that this only crown is that is coming in. But Ye, note that's like as as pretty much all of us fear and expected to just more and more new variants coming in all the crown definitely, who won't be the last. But you know, it's yet and now the very end to just get anxious and scared about. But even as the cases go up, restrictions increase and there's just no real light insight here. I mean, even with the vaccines, etc. New Variance keep coming and everything essentially resets. Even with hope that we have to just speak about the elephant in the room here, namely that someone, or rather something or or should I perhaps just come up and say it one specific film? It was really profiting from all of this. I'm talking, of course, of who go getting good at this one thousand nine hundred and sixty three film on my Crown, starring or not, though summatory, and because this is probably the best advertisement, yet, alone free advertisement, this film has gotten in almost sixty years. I mean, let's not forget here. You go get good at this. Is mostly known for being the least known, called director of Rogo Palchi, so known that he only got his first letter in the title. What? Everyone else got their first too, and now there is genuinely a market to talk about this film. I feel it's been the Chadows for about fifty eight years, so that is just what will do. The memes are flying a around alread day and honestly, we love it. We hope we can get even more eyes on on the crown, as the film is surprisingly genuinely good work seeing, has some surprisingly apt commentary and even has some tie ins with the pandemic itself. So it's all you are not only the only co holts that are already seen on the crown before this new eryant came out. But it's also one of your favorite films. So proselytize a bit there. What is so great about on the crown? Yes, so I'm a crown is a film that I'd actually seek tell sort out for very many years. They because in Robert Pag greg already's sequence was always my favorite sequence. I mean hus Celini's cheese one or whatever. We seem to get a lot of the acclaim, but yeah, the sequence which Greg already...

...it was always my favorite part. So I managed to eventually locate I'm a crown around four years ago, and no, not the omicron variant Onm Acron, the film. And when I sat down to watch she you know, I was a bit apprehensive. I've been seeking out this film for about ten years. But no, as it was absolutely excellent, because it's basically a satire, or maybe parody, on the way the human body works. So we've got an alien and WHO's taken over the dead body of a human being. But unlike in most films you think of things like invasion of the body snatches or ones where aliens take our human beings actually has a lot of trouble learning to use the human body and just the very mechanical ways that he moves his body is absolutely hilarious. Like he's trying to use his arm. He's like putting it out like one of those machines in the gay arcades where try and like used to handle whatever, to go down like rabbitoy and bring it back up. So it's like it's like it's moving it like a joystick. And all of is like facial expressions are just copied of what he's seeing other people doing, with absolutely hilarious results. And, you know, the film does, you know, do to a just of other things with union rights and whatever. But yeah, just a fantastic way of looking at how weird our human bodies are when we don't actually think how weird they are. But you know, everything you know from, you know, smoking and being able to blow out smoke to different things like blowing raspberries, to just the ways that we walk and just of just hilarious stuff. You know, like he's trying to like copies rabbits or whatever. It ends up, you know, hopping along and he's like jumps up to pry in the way you lambs is exactly the way other people are praying. It's just an amazing look at just how strange our human bodies are in ways that we don't really tend to think about it as adults. So all about you, Tom did you like all this, your reaction to think on the ground for the first time? Did it the live after your expectations? It certainly did. I mean the only expectations are had. US here in that solid enjoyed it and the director, Hugo Gregor Essy, had never encountered any of his works before. So, you know, I wasn't really sure what to expect. But we've got a brilliantly inventive sci fi and, as Saul said, the situational comedy around the alien hosts who takes over the body of this worker. It's just brilliant, the situations that he gets into. We're all hilarious. I think one of my favorites is when he first begins to learn how to walk and the hospital and he just shuffles around at a rapid pace and he crashes into all the walls and the doors and just keeps on going and it's just hilariously imagination behind this, and it's interesting that Gregor Etty also wrote the screenplay for the film as well. This is a very creative director with lots of talent, and...

I'm very entrue to look into the other films he's worked on, because there anything like Comicon, then hopefully we'll be in for a tree. Yeah, I mean I can definitely say you should probably seek out the Robo Park or Rogo pop gee, because he does showcase a lot of his promise there as well, even though it is a very different the short and there's obviously three great and massive directors present. They're with the good dark bird or to the Indian Parsleini. But but yeah, I think for for for omicron, my first thought, being this at least are on the five to ten minute mark, was that, yeah, I can see why Saul loves this movie because, like anyone who knows the soul knows that he loves the body horror. And well, this is a comedy like the body horror elements are getting in the dare. I mean the way the film just focus is in on what this man, or rather this being inside of this man, does with the body. It is that body horror experience and so just focusing on the body, seeing it make this odd gestures and movement, it's just so unique honestly, it's I've never seen this done in this way in a comedy before. Like salt said, it's so mechanical and I love the way that it kind of creates this set of expectations as he essentially goes through every single type of regular human movement and behavior and bodily function, with a few notable examples, and you can see what happens that he goes all in. He did like if someone makes a sound, he'll emulate that sound to its most extreme function. If some of the's a movement, he'll emulate that movement to some extreme function. And you just know where this could go and it just seems so again newly inhuman. And there are salts are just to heavy. Is especially that see you talk about with the crying religious women, with you also have his added internal talk process. We thinks that their tears are these people producing their own food. So we emulates the tears and then try it in such a dreams it so tears. It's just such an insane sight and it works so well. It's just so yeah, I can just really see why you love this film so much self. Really please that you guys have responded well to Amacrona because, yes, a sort of film where, you know, I mentioned, nobody's even heard of it before, but you know, as soon as they announced theying of this new vering of covid this was the first thing that came to mind. I really liked how the film started on quite a serious note. I mean you've got this gripping open sequence that displays all the hallmarks of the sixties Italian crime thriller, when a woman and a young children accidentally uncovered the corpse of a man, and it's shot really well,...

...with the camera being behind these long tubes, kind of creating this claustrophobic image of the woman uncovering the corpse. And it's not until, you know, maybe five ten minutes in until the comedy starts, and I think that's a great introduction to the film. But then when the comedic elements come into play, it really engages the viewer. I mean it's such an intrigue and scenario of it a corpse coming back to life and, as I said, it's played for obvious laughs, but it also showcases a lot of inventive humor and I think that's where I'm kon really shines year. The the photography in on my plan is absolutely amazing. I agree, those opening shoe shots, but just a lot of just the angles through our and the way that the director photography are Carlo Deparma, the way he uses are smoke and I gets into each other is absolutely amazing. And Kylor deparmer, pronouncing his name correctly, was of course Michael Angelo Antonio. He's our right and you know, shooting up, low, up and red desert for him, which is too and Tony on he's most mysterious films with the most sense of mystery. She is really great that he also do the Woody Allen Film Shadows and fog and lush's black and wise and your black and wise really were colored upalmer really succeeds for me AG least as a cinematographer, even though, of course, you know, I guess blobs in color, but just yeahs. But Black and white work is done with very structions every years. Amazing and you're the film just looks absolutely stunning. It is good to see such an out right in your face comedy with that kind of cinematography as well, because that's not something that you often get and it adds a lot of layers to the film that allow you to appreciate it feel far more than the humor. I think I'll to go back to what you said before to Tom but I did like the first five to ten minutes. They don't feel like a comedy at all and that's one of the most interesting choices, get what at they made in this film, because it doesn't really use the type of normal carmedy cinematic language, if you will, like there's no engaging hectic music coming into the movie at the first tide of time. Movie was then newly feel like some kind of grim Italian thrill there even brought to Giallo. And as the film continues, there's very few sound effects, there's no there's very little, you know, again, fast based music, there's no boling's, there's none of that elements usually expect in as Italian comedy, especially the more mainstream as they one's like with the total for instance. So it placed the very very differently, and this is why, like the body comedy element, early arm, it's all startling. It's because you just don't know where this movie is going. It's set up this relatively serious, smooth and then suddenly the mechanical body start kipping people...

...in the face and acting in completely unusual ways and and it takes you off God and then that that's kind of told. That kind of language kind of continues with the film and most of the comedy comes from either the body itself or their commentary, off of Army Cron, the secret agent that has possessive body. Yes, the commentary is one of the strongest points of armor Cron because that's where it makes all his observations and he keeps hilariously refer to human bodies as prehistoric. And they're just lots of great moments and just so well timed up. Like there's a part where, without spoiling it too much, he's considering killing a human host body and he's just about to do it and then this commentary or conversation with his role that I did suddenly stops him, you know, midsentence. Just sort of like looks like stairs directly into the camera. So yeah, it's all incredibly well timed. There's just, you know, such great observational thing. You know, it really is. You know what you know human civilization would look like aliens and you just just does so much more than than the average are. But body snatches film, as I mentioned earlier. As well as the brilliant commentary, the monologs that you hear from omicron, you also get the communication that he has telepathically with his superiors, the rest of the alien macer are off planet, and that leads to a lot of humor as well and it adds a nice contrast in it a parallel to omicron's human host Angelo, because he has a lot of interactions with his superiors and the factory that he works in as well. Do you got a nice parallel between the human and the alien elements, and that works really well for the political satire as well. You speaking of the political satire and the factor, you know, one of the funniest parts over there is you know, like this and Psychas well. Sooner we're going to like redeploying and a sudden is getting in there and he's doing you know, hundreds of these like every single minute. So it just really makes you think about the other labor market and the way that workers are explored little bit, which does time into some of the unions stuff of the film later on brings up, but I guess it's all like shows. You may guess maybe what the human body is capable of, or what somebody will be capable of doing with their body if they didn't realize that. Off I keep working at this role, whether I'm going to get exhausted. There's actually a lot of the human body can do it and can enjoy. You know, if you've got your own dolphins in the orange German rush us, you can do all that. But you know, obviously you know we don't do it every single day, but I know I'm going to just slowly becomes into the human body. Yeah, maybe they capable doing that for a little bit. In a way it almost for shadows robotics industry that comes in and as implemented a lot of changes in factory working tread the last fifty years, because you see this human he's been taken over by an alien and he can just work with no limits and produce huge amount of products. And in a way there's a kind of foreshadowing going...

...on there. In some ways it's boy eastern works as a machine, which which ties in with just this kind of brutish expression near to we. We just see him go at it as if he was part of the machineries, just as such a high speed at the point to this breaks the machines because it's too quick for them. There's some hilarious scenes there and the I suppose, even if I'm sure if they're necessarily for shadows it. But it's certainly a showcases what the owner of a factory would choose if they had the opportunity. A lot of their human amicon gave me a similar feeling to that of watching the excellent healing sci fi comedy the man in the white suit. And although the subject matter in these two films is very different, in both films folks their Sci fi ideas from it playful angle and uses concepts as a Stephen Stone for kind of classic taper comedy. And, as you've mentioned already, both somes have a satirical slant that brings extra impact and provides food for thought alongside the him. Yeah, and the satire elements there are really interesting because it really punches you a lot of different directions. I mean, Promoto said so far, you know, you could expect that it would be, you know, all out in the favor of the workers, but the workers are gone terribly here. I mean they're brutish, their violent, their self centered. They will almost you know, they were beat up or hurt anyone that we get in the way of the of their their aims. Essentially, they're really not the portrayed that's a particularly nice people, and this is probably why a lot of it's very clear and direct. The class NOWs, if because it does actually have a bit of a point, a bit of ominous point or statement. Rather, there are about class society and I think the fact that it does punch in every direction early arm gives it a lot of rude to just do that. I can't really think of many other films has just done this so directly and intuitively. When a recording lays out his plans, finally got it, is read all the books in in existence, is far finally studied all of human society and he's realized that you don't need to go to war with humans at all. They just need essentially a few thousand aliens that came to come in, take over a couple of thousand bodies and then they can control the entire world because, as he says, there is a clear class society. They just need to take over the top, the top elites, the owners, the few billionaires, multimillionaires on top and then they control everything. It even goes as far as to give, you know what, a clear economic showcase here. Finally, I think it's one of the few places with comedic sound effects, probably to sell it a bit better, showing how, you know, the economy is owned by just a few companies...

...that both employ the majority of the people and give them their salary, and then these people spend their salary buying products of these companies. It shows the cycle. It shows people, you know, getting money running to buy the cars in ultra speed and then it just shows it's very clearly owners on one side, workers and consumers and the others in the vially just hammers that point down over and over again, and I think it's quite fair to see it. Say that the no regret is probably quite clearly left this. It's quite easy to see why he would be, for instance, working with the good daughter Puzzolini in Rogopati, but I really think that that class analysis in particular, it's very rare to see it and feel like this, but I think it's it's all the clearest examples that we've seen in a film of this type. That else think it's just really well done. MONEST and and it fits the movie quite well and it's just just don't it's so much humor and clarity. Yeah, that's an excellent point about the consumer society and the way I'm a crime depicts it. And Yeah, you're entirely correct with the way they've got the ore, seems, of the cars being sold and I'm a contrying to describe it to his rule on the way he describes it, to his like rules or his boss of sounds absolutely ridiculous. The like. Okay, will we need to have these consumers and as bosses are like well, like like by the stuff of the rich people sell, and I will who pays them? Foret their money from all the rich people. And when you put it like that way, it's sort of like, seems a bit ridiculous, like the governor, people in charge give us this money, so we then give it back to the upper classes. They give it to us and we give money backs and and keep giving back to them. They keep going back to us and you put it that way is, yeah, the way that could him society works as absolutely seen, absolutely ridiculous. And I guess when one of the more creatible, more interesting parts of it, the Omicron's boss or ruler asks him to imagine or to visualize the wealthy people without their clients on, which is, you know, you know, absolutely, you know, insane and whatever. And Yeah, just absolutely makes the those people are in charge, those who've actually got the money and power, seem absolutely ridiculous, which, you know, perhaps they are. You've made some excellent points there and it's a good job that it's in a comedy because otherwise the you know, the angle that Gregory is going for could be quite sobering because it can have quite a powerful impact. One thing I want to mention that Chris touched upon briefly was where I'micron loons to read, and this for me was one of the standout pieces of comedy and the film, because as soon as he learns to read, he has the ability to scan through books at an immense speed and we see him read a number of wellknown books and his reactions to the different novels he takes in our fantastic, oh yeah, desolitely hilarious. My particular favorite is when he stumbles upon a book of Pridgate Bardo's photo shoots and he's so taken with it that he pockets it to return to later...

...on. Yeah, so absolutely, I'm great seeing the one. We speed ring through all the books and what you do mention about Gregory and whether we made a bit of a Serbering Film. I don't know if we want to get into boil a territory or have some spoilers later on, but I would say this much. Even though a lot of the films are laugh out with out of fear, I think it does gets some very serious things, maybe a little bit later on, looking a bit a bit about the vulnerability of humankind. But yeah, I don't want to spoil it too much until we get to that stage of the episode. I think you can spoil a wayseelf. Go for it. Okay, so you guys have been warned. Our spoilers to come. Spoiler warning. So the film ends with this news footage of Angelo, or the host of Omicron, of his body being crushed by workers who are storming back to work, and we think arch as just ended there, and the TV producers go on about his crazy ufo and alien invasions and come conspiracies that we think. You know, it's all land there and we gradually see that these these people sitting around and watching the footage and you know, initially think, okay, you know, these are just, you know, bosses of the factor and they're going, you know, look at the shameless guy died or whatever, but at least a good pot plans into place. But then their conversations get progressively stranger and they start to talk about things like play, placing limits and human emotions. And then the film ends with this amazing shot where they all begin to smoke the same way that omicron smokes, and all the smoke just like pause out of their mouth just bruis and fills up the whole room and you think to yourself, you know, like do whatever. You know, the aliens have swere on the podcast now. I it's fine, it just amused me. Yeah, Oh, Damn, you know, the aliens have taken over your you're welcome to bleep me out. Yeah, it quite dumb. I was just going to say I totally agree with with solar the ending is its sublime. You know, it pulls the rug from undering unsuspected audience in it in a grand manner. At the end there with the reveal of how they smoke. is they're the same way you did onmicon smokes and it ends the film with a a smart and amusing twist, which makes her a memorable pin Ali. One part of me does wonder whether a slightly more ambiguous ending would have fitted as well, with the smoking scene removed, so you kind of left in the dark as to whether the people around the table at the end are actually aliens or not,...

...where that would have had just as strong an impact. But as it is, I think it's a fitting end to the film and it ends on the quite a high note for me. And there's also a little bit of hope there, isn't it? I mean it's common as in itself, but on the chrome, the essentially dies trying to transmit that there is this thing inside the human body called the empathy and that did is empathy of will will essentially take over and that they won't be able to haul the bodies forever and everybody could even kill them. So there is this idea as well that these people who have been possessed there in the end that you know, it's not going to necessarily laugh. So that is built into the film as well. So perhaps it's it's even at a bit of a positive and thing that these people, their plot won't actually succeed. Yeah, that's a very good point, quest because we see that with omicron towards the end as well, where omicron and Angelo were both talking to each other in the same body in the battling for control over there the shared body, and this makes require a compelling scene in a busy subway carriage where mcron is by set by all the workers, and again the strong cinematography comes into play there and it's an interesting elements of the film that I wish would have been explored more, this battle between the human and ailing control and in the same body. But as it is, that that was one of the memorable sequences for me. Yeah, the real and flow, it's not really shown until the ends. He's kind of not really a part of that of the film. So even though you kind of want to feel for him, that's a little bit, you know, confused because you don't know who we as you don't really have this inbuilt nulge of who he is, that this connection to him. So it's I guess having that stretched out could definitely have helped the film be even stronger. Like for about you not sure if it's O macron becoming more human or if it's untual fighting back, or if it's both, but it is some interesting development as or macron stops being this machine, like being specifically just trying to make me human behavior and actually goes into the real world and get some kind of additional agency, learned to speak, it s out, and of course the first thing he learned is to swear at the drivers, which which was huld perhaps is very fittigue. So we've had a lot of positive things to say about the film because it is, you know, it's a wild ride, it's a lot of fun and you is to find out if there any things that you think perhaps didn't work as well as they could have. I'm still torn between whether or not it was very, very good movie or potentially a great movie, and I'm leaning towards very good and I think there is some slight tonal issues here that made it a little difficult to fully embrace it. We talked about it earlier. We're you know, the first five to ten minutes...

...are literally just a thriller and it's it's well done and everything, but it doesn't really dive that well with the rest of the film. Like what do we care about inspector trying to, you know, find out what happened, for instance. I mean it's a build up and it makes what happens later more of a surprise, but it's not, you know, a clear cut, concise comedy as it should have been. That's bought the strength and a weakness. I struggle with that because that's one of the more unique things about it too. Is certainly one of the things I appreciate the most about it, but I do think that if it had leaned a little more into being a full armed comedy from beginning, I might have liked it even more. But that it's really difficult for me to say, because the way it's done is so special and unique that it's worth it very part of I'm a problem which I do find a little bit weak. I was I noticed the first time around and when I re watched it for this podcast episode I had the same thing spring to mind. There's just the middle section of it, like before the hilarious suicide stretch, which sounds completely wrong to say that, but there's a hilarious sections. Have Gone to spoil a territory where he is trying to kill himself. So just before then it gets like a little bit bogged down for me in some of the Union and some of the politics stuff about, you know, working in factories, when you know most of it's been yours very you know, run rose up people like very like. You know about Zeo satire, you know full of you know, comedic ideas. It does get very dramatic for Aubit in the middle there, before it becomes you know, this crazy, you know, trying to kill yourself thing and before it comes to everything else at the end. So the middle part of the film sags a little bit for me. But you know, overall I think I gave it a coming. Gave it an age nine in time rabble. I loved again a lot of box I'll put it up as four and a half out of five stars. For me it is one of those pots he of films. Me, I think it's an absolutely excellent film. I probably need a really rewatch Robert Pager, because I can barely remember. We're already sequenced in and except other than, you know, just thinking it was just so much superior to the other three sequences that come before, even though he was the least known director for me. Of the flour attached to that film. It's interesting that the floors were finding the movie only minor flaws, and it's the same from my perspective as well. I feel that one element that doesn't really work so well is the brief love interest on my crown has with a lady who works in their Canteena there the factory, and this could have been melt for lots of comical MOS deads Gregory takes us down quite a dark path that feels a little at odds with the rest of the film. Yeah, but I supposed because on a crown learns through imitation. He is not seeing people, you know, with with love interested. It's not something that...

...he comes across until he reads through the books and he reads one. I can't remember the exact title, but something to do with a love so until that moment I suppose he's he's in the dark, but it could have made for a lot of hilarious moments if that was explored a bit more. But I'm pleased that it's in souls top five hundred films. I don't think it would quite make my top five hundred, but it's it's very close and it's great that, you know, we've had a chance to rediscover this film because it's got only any votes on IMDB and letterboxed and it's definitely one that needs to be rediscovered because, you know, it comes across as a one of those hidden gems that needs more exposure. I think a lot of people are going to have a great time with it and quite a few people are certainly going to consider it as a favorite film of their. Yeah, I might just mention on the letter box thing, that I did go recently and look at the reviews that have been logged for it and you know, most of them have come out since early December when the very it was named for obvious reasons. But you know most of the reviews and we just sort you know by you know when reviews I just joke you on. So I don't know there's people have actually, you know, watched the film or the just you thought of, you know, something that I was to say, like one persons who are not one person wearing a mask, partly selfish behavior and of course views got to like in there and you know, somebody else is running. Here we go again and it's got three like so I don't know if the people are actually watching the films. So I'd be grafty and more people actually watch should and write reviews rather than people going all that's funny. I'm going to comment on stiital, which seems to be what's happening at them a lot of the moment at least, people are searching for Homocron. People are finding this movie and you know, we's do see memes flying around on facebook, etc. As well from this movie. She stuff the posters to who knows who has actually seen it, but it's it's clearly getting a big push and it's all thanks to covid. Yeah, I mean, I think I joke someher whatever. You know, this is like one of the few good things that I've kind out of COVID, although I hope with the Delta out right, we can see a whole bunch of people rewatching or re discovering the Delta force, because that's nowhere nearest classy at films on the crown. Yeah, I'm really happy didn't have to Rewatch the out the force for this episode. Really happy about that. And and talking about the two things that came out of Covid, there's probably it's probably no secret that this podcast in so many ways, was borne out of Covid as well, being confined to all homes, was the catalyst that set all this into motion. In that way, we share a slight connection to on the crown's newfound popularity. So yeah,...

...lets you say at least two good things. We're born out of COVID. Everybody, you heard about on the crown and we had a platform to talk about it. And yes, as you all know, this is our very last episode of the season and the year. But do not worry, season three is coming up and you have some really great stuff plan for you. We have one episode in particular talking about just one singular recent sci fi blockbuster, and it's already recorded. I think you can easily guess which film I'm referring to. And you know what, we kind of like this format, so we might easily do a few more episodes focused on one Pacific Film. Will also have more best of the air counts ups, including the obligatory best films of two thousand and twenty one. We have more industry interviews and, yes, more director focused episodes, and re Turkoski is already pitched and in the works hell. We may even open up cans of worms of the controversial topics so thank you so much for listening. Feel free to go back to our library and discover or rediscover some of our older pearls and we'll see you in two thousand and twenty two. Happy New Year everyone in year, happy new yeah, everyone, you have been listening to talking images, the official podcast of ICM FORUMCOM.

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