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Talking Images
Talking Images

Episode 7 · 2 years ago

Eric Rohmer's Comedies and Proverbs Cycle, Part 1

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

SPOILER WARNING:

Our discussions are in two sets - one based on the basic plot and early development of the story - and then a dissection of the ending and the films as a whole. There will be a clear spoiler warning at the halfway point.

If you have not seen the films in question you can then skip to the next film, the starting times are:

Introduction to the Cycle: 00:00

The Aviator's Wife: 10:00

A Good Marriage: 35: 25

Pauline at the Beach: 55:00

You are listening to talking images, the official podcast of ICM Forumcom. All right, welcome back everyone. I'm Chris and today will be talking about Eric Romer's comedies and proverbs. Psycho what one of my favorite aeric Romer quotes is that the opposite of truth is true, and his cinema was truly one of contradictions. What fun more natural. He was a practicing Catholic, frequently cited as a conservative, but leading coheres to cinema and a set of largely Marxist film theorists into a cinematic revolution. His work life and home life were completely compartmentalized, to the point that aeric grower was not even his real name. His mother died in one thousand nine hundred and seventy still believing he was an English teacher, and it is said that his wife and children did not meet his closest collaborators until his death bed. This extremity carried into his films. He saw each project as debate. If he had a thesis, that is, an idea he believed be true, he went out to find Dantithesis. Then he would let them baddle it out on screen. Essentially, the definition of dialectical filmmaking, the likely more regalion than Marxist. Underneath is quiet, restrained minimali style. There is a sense of extreme turboil, but at the same time I can't really think of a single roamer film that that some level does not work as a comedy. Nothing is ever as it seems, and his character often poofully, unaware of everything around them, are lost in their own pretensions and desires. This is where the humor in comedy truly comes from. His films are filled with double meanings and irony and perhaps none so much. That is utterly delightful. Comedies and proverb cycle, and I think you have so much fun here. Each film is building on and exploring the same core conflict, the same day elected, if you will, the electric of men and women, the electric of relationships, are electric of love, comedism, proverbs, the cycle of six films made between one thousand nine hundred and eighty one and one thousand nine hundred and eighty seven. Then compass the aviator's wife, a good marriage, pauline at the beach, full moon in Paris, the Green Ray and my boyfriend's girlfriend. In this episode we will talk you through each of the film's dig into the smallest details and see how they build on each other, contradict each other and even complete each other. With me today are three absolutely wonderful coholt of well, hello, this is Clem from friends. I'm really excited to watch about Roman today. Is some nature I learn to love more with each film I slaking, so I'm really looking forward to discusses Psychul with you, guys. Nice Co host is our fantastic producer, Adam, who hasn't been on the show since the very first episode. Really took Romer to get in back and I'm so excited to have you here. Hi. Question. I'M gonna happy to be back. Eric members one of my favorite directors and this is one of my favorite series of films. I'm really looking forward to discussing all films today and I'm very happy to be back on the podcast again. And we thought, for the very first time, to be US and to be US and twenty three years old and I'm German Danish. Agree a lot with your introduction. I'm a huge fan of Romer and comedies and proverbs. It's in particular because it's, you know, Holler. It's a most romary and so departure, of course, from the moral tales, fort of very free form, more light and comedy, more theatrical as opposed to a stringe in narrative. And that's what I really like about all of these films today, to see some proverbs as a bit of a response to the moral tales, are so different and so similar at the same time. Obviously the moral tales all centered around a man and all and all but one of the comings and proverb center around a woman. But more so something has fundamentally changed, which is exactly what to we has talked about. You no longer have the first person narrator in a world there are laws. Is Certain of this really ties into the free flow of the COMMONIS. In proverbs there's no one perspective and the dynamics and the morality and what...

...they explore just feel a lot freer, a lot more open, and that, yeah, I agree, and I don't necessarily think it's a stringent dualism, with the leads in the moral tails being men and the leads in the Comitis and problems being women. But I think it's more this sort of this idea of being determined versus not being determined, of the characters in the comedies and proverbs they don't know what they want. That sort of an overarching seeing that seems to run through all of the comedies and problems. Well, I'm not sure if it's the case that they don't know what they want, because if some of the characters seems quite sure of it themselves, it might rather be that what they want is either impossible or a dream. HMM. But to me that also speaks to some degree of confusion. For instance, in a good marriage. It seems almost like an inflection of my nighted modes because she makes the exact same desition. Way It's not as absurd as in my nighted modes where he sees at a girl in church and then he thinks, okay, I'm going to marry her, though he's never talked to her, and then he stumbles into another woman who he spends to night with an apartment, and in the film it's Larrycy's almost framed as cheating. In a way it also feels like Romer created calmism proverbs and call them calmis in proverbs, because he was tired of being misunderstood, the MIS characterized as overly moralistic and judgmental, because that's how a lot of people saw his original moral tales. There saw it as Romer expressing essentially traditional Catholic volute, which is obviously part of it, but the counterpoint was always present and I think that Romer wanted to in this one break free of the constraints he had in moral tails and really play around with the teass and and the teas is in a more free and more creative or open way. Yes, it's interesting that you mentioned being judgmental, Chrish, because for me the main thing I guy the films was the character study. So I think every film was a character study and I spent a lot of the time judging the characters based on their actions. That was my approach to the films when I first watched the films. I think I had to send approach as you did, Adam, looking at the characters actions, what they were doing, what they were saying, what they wanted, and judging them. But also I think the characters in all of these films are very human. They make mistakes, they're not perfect, they want something that they cannot have, don't make rational choices. So in a sense it's like looking at Real, real person's real characters to dialog seems very natural, just like type of conversation you would have with you always a friend or was someone just met, or sometimes you know acting, you know trench way. So yeah, I think that's what I found refascinating about rumors filmography as a whole, and particularly this cycle, is just how how humans and how real all the characters film. Yeah, just to be clear, I don't mean I was spending the whole time negative, we judging people. I was trying to look at them as if they were real people, and I think one of the many strengths of the director is that you can watch the film and Loi feel like you're watching real people with real conversations. And, to be first, some of them are about almost made to be disliked, so judging their actions is a normal thing to do. At the very first time I saw comments in proverbs, I was actively don't share characters as well, because I came in with the framework of the moral tails. But on retrospect, seeing them now, I responded to them less as characters but more as representations of ideas and positions that Romer was playing around with, and that made them work a lot more for me, and I think one really important difference there is that in the moral tales, rumors seem to be actively mocking some of his lead characters, like if you look at the collector, for instance, the lead character is essentially lumppoon from beginning to end, and this type of almost mean spirited mockery is not present in comedies and proverbs. Characters do things, we can judge them really harshly for absolutely, but it's presented in a much more do once way, which also makes two films a lot more...

...open and a lot more interesting. And this does bring us up to the individual films themselves, starting with the very first entry into the series, the aviator's wife, which in many ways feels a little bit like an odd duckling in this cycle. It is the only film in the series that has a male protagonist and in so many ways is it seems to bring over a lot of the ideas Romer had before. Let us start with the proverb itself, which rings very true within the storyline. You can't think of nothing, and this really seems to fit our lead character from soois perfectly. He is obsessed with a recent girlfriend named Anne, and I say obsessed because it's clear that the feelings are not mutual. The Very First Act of the film is him desperately chasing after her to try and inform her that he has found her a plumber, but she not even wanting to see him or hear from him, actively avoids every attempt until he chases her down in a restaurant. The build up here is incredibly interesting. We see him walk the street from station to station, we see him try to call, we see rejection and see his persistence and it is thoroughly heartbreaking to watch, to see him be put down so partially. And then an obsession clearly starts to grow. He sees her with her ex and he starts to follow the eggs and a mystery of sword start to unravel. said that Romans never making fun of his character us, but at the start of the aviator's wife it almost feels like he's sort of marking him or he's making uns I look quite ridiculous, especially because it's a plumber. It's extra ridiculous. But later on the film humanizes so much more. He even comments to Lucy. Later on he says I look ridiculous right where he's obviously realizing that it's not doing well for himself and he sees that and he knows that and it's quite humanizing because and sort of leads him on and she doesn't treat him too nicely, and also because of the entire circumstance of his trip, which leads us even more to sympathize with my opinion, it because he's working night shout as this postal office and after finishing his shift he waits for her, then he sees, you know, her ex and is all these thoughts. He can really asleep. So he wanted to run Paris and it's sort of becomes a stilirious stream trip almost because he hasn't gotten any sleep, and it's something quite relatable. But your eye had this at the Times I didn't sleep, and then the next day sort of becomes fragment, terrys of you. You become a bit delirious and you sort of don't take in the world quite as you would if you were entirely away. I think it's an interesting point. You mentioned to be us about the dreams and the character working night shift and falling, the sleeping different places. Actually, the fact that he works in night shifts and also study during the day really show that he is not, on the obsessed with love's also obsessed with working in general. Studies during the day, work at the post office during the night. He has a girlfriend is also looking for a premier for her. So is always on the move, always doing something. So it gets really well with the proverb one cannot think of nothing. To Go back on the dream topic, I think it's are interesting the faculty fall asleep. I think if we sleep twice in the film, if I if I remember correctly. The first one thing when he spots Chris John, the exs of Anna, and the second time is later on when he's with receive in a cafish waiting for Chris join the mysterious woman to come out at what they figure to be the lawyer's office. And it's really it's really interesting because we don't really know for a fact that what we're seeing is real. So yeah, I think it's an interesting thing to add in your film. Do your character falling to sleep and going in this dream like adventure? Like to focus on a little bit there. Every something really separate aviator's wife from all other Romer films is the way it is shot, because it has feeling and experience almost off a one take film. It uses slow, brooding, contempt ative atmosphere to build tension. For follow from Swak walk from place to place. We feel the tension inside of it when he is buying on fushion and this woman he is walking with and he's tracking her along. We see him walking behind them in...

...the street, we see him sitting behind them on the bus. Way Of this feeling that we are there. I don't think I've ever seen this in a Romer film before and they just work so well. And at the same time, where they get to the park and with the introduction of Lucy, the film also get a bit of a childlike mad shit called wonder like. It really feels like an adventure film. And I would also really love to hear from Adama because know that when he visited Paris he went to this park specifically because of this film. So with this, first of all love to hear a little bit about how Adam has interacted with this film over the years and also this is experiences inside of the park itself. Yeah, so I first watched the film quite a few years ago and I re watched it again last week. My main memory of the film was was really only the scenes between Francois and they see, and actually she's only in the film for a for a minute, so lesson half the film, which surprised me, and I think those things are the essence of the film and it's the reason I like the film in the first place, because the start of the film and the end of the film with Anne and Francois to me. They're like they feel like the kind of reality, the reality of adult wife, whereas when funds one meets to see everything has a different kind of feel to it. She brings a kind of innocence and youth to it that I think is missing from the rest of the film. And Lucy was my favorite character watching the film, just because she was playful and positive, whereas fans one and really didn't have those kind of qualities. I think the part also feels like another favorite character for me. I'd have to explain it. There's something about the part that brings out so much of the film. When I went to Paris is Chris mentioned a couple of years ago, I went to the park and it's not even right in the center of parish. You have to had to travel a little bit to get there and it's just amazing park with like so many different levels. It's just massive park and yeah, just like the film itself, I think there's so many different features and qualities. Chris mentioned it didn't feel like any other Roma Film and I'm not sure if I agree with that. It doesn't feel like most of his films. I agree and tell you with that, but it does remind me a bit of his very early films, like the sign of Leo or the bakery goal of monsieur, where it's also sort of a character walking through the streets of Paris, sort of bit undetermined, where exactive is a going, sort of wondering searching for something. Also, ever, survive very much as a spirit of nuvel back film under run, where just take a sixty billimeter camera and go in the streets of Paris and then you just shoot. I think it's something again, that makes this film what it is. It has this amazing media season. We taken completely right to be off. It feels like some of his earlier fields, and this also reminds me of a Roman quote. M The film itself. In the s we conquered the streets, in the S we mastered it this really seems to tie in with how he composed the film as well. So we talked a little bit about the moral tales and between that and comedies and proverbs, he made a custom film on a sound stage in Germany. He made percival, which was an extremely theatrical film, and then he worked in theater, including Catherine Alburn, and what he said in part one to do with this film was to compose people on the street as well as he could compose them in the theater. I think this place so well with how the scenes are done, especially the introduction of Lucy, where we at first see her on the bus with no speaking lines, we see from Sam bump into her outside the bus, again with no speaking lines, and then we see her essentially walk as an extra behind him, but with a specific kind of focus. So in terms of being able to stage the outside world as well as his stage, the theater at the side. To said, I think rover was completely successful. It seems like Roman riffs on Hopi Crime novels are his card films, almost in the encounter between friends why and Lucy where she calls him a detective and he sort of plays into it for a while in a way plans genre film in his sort of ordinary slice of life peace, which is something really interesting because it gets our minds and spinning in these different direction where the aviator's wife becomes both a mystery film but also something completely ordinary on the streets of Paris. This is the one of the main way is also feels so different from most Roman films. You get getting newly invested in the mystery. You're looking for clues with the characters that you're again do...

...an involved. You want to know more, you want to know who this woman is. When Roger but reviewed Kistoski's free colors, he called them, I think, an anti drama and anti comedy and anti Romans, and that almost feels applicable to most of the comicist and proverbs as well. Where is this is in a way an anti suspense film. It's a counterpoint in a way that draws st element in, but more as something that's happening it tally in our minds or in the minds of the characters as well. There's some base virusm here, but it's white, harmless, but in our minds it becomes so much bigger, and that's something very, very interesting that the film does it sort of. It activates the viewers just, I think, origin nice feet of a lot of Roman films spoil a warning. I think it speaks a lot to the magic that Roma manage to create that when in the come they seen Lucy suddenly says that she will have to leave, then see that franchising able to keep following Christian and the mystery woman, that there's almost this sinking feeling because at that point the magic is gone, the childlike wonder is gone and what is left is this clash with reality. I think it's really interesting that at this point the film switches to answer you. We see a few scenes setting up her character further before we end up with our two counterables throughout this entire film from swoan and meeting up in one location. And I think that says a lot about the structure of the film as well, because the first two acts are so open, they're out in the street. You can feel how it moves and how it involves you. But then in the final act you have these two characters and their emotions laid bare in a singular location with the door locked, and it is constantly of one of them will leave and the other stops them. It's almost a little bit claustrophobic even what we've seen before, and this scene is just get newly intense and it lasts for such a long time we don't even realize along it lass. I think early it last for about twenty to twenty five minutes and it manages just keep that intense feeling. will also in so many ways concluding and assessing both of these two characters and the events we have been seen. That's a great catch with when loser Jeeves, the childlike wonders gone, I just realize that's the point when funds why turns from a detective into a voyeur suddenly and everything becomes much, much less fantastical and really kind of a verse and where he wants out of it and the other things when he when he confronts and at the end it's, of course, of what the entire film sets sets up to that the something something wrong in their relationship where where he's probably just some sort of getaway from the Avia, to some kind of replacement that she doesn't really want to commit to. Then they speak it out, but it seems that the final conclusion is really what we all already know so it just drags on for longer and it's really quite sad for funds war because he's the stuck in a hole between two women which are just as unattainable for him in a way, both and and Lucy. And it seems like what the film is sort of portraying is that he doesn't do himself any good by what necessarily wanting to know everything sort of you just could. He goes deeper and deeper down the rabbit hole and he doesn't help himself at all. I had a lot ship between for Francois, because most of the time hands on film she's telling funds want to leave and then when we get to the bedroom scene at the end, she's telling him to leave repeatedly, and then when Fransquare finally was to leave, she then comes the back. So I think Anne is not helping the situation. I think she just uses funds wha when she when she wants some, to call them back and then the rest of the time to tell him where to go. So I think it was quite a sad portrayal of Francois. I fellow I watch sympathy for France Wois, whereas I really didn't like an. I think I came away with a little more sympathy for Anne. I think that, especially in the early scenes, she were giving up very strong signals that this that she did not want to see from Suis. I think she was consistently clear throughout the film as well that it's not that serious of a relationship, but Opos at the same time she treats him horribly. Yeah, I mean, you say it's consistent, but the reality is she keeps give him the same message and when he when he does go to leave, she comes them back. So she is creating the problem. She knows he's obsessed with her, that he loves her, and by telling...

...him to come back she's opening him up to doing that exact kind of behavior again and again, and she knows when she needs some she can have them. Pretty much spot on in that. However, I think in the first part of the film you don't necessarily see how mark she cared for Christian. The am it there and at the end I think we get a lot more sympathy for just how heartbroken she is and how she needs someone, but obviously that someone happens to be from swath. He is essentially just her rebound and she doesn't seem to consider or care for him, particularly while he pears to love her, or at least wants to love her. For him it seems like a really extreme passion. It's just isn't return. Yeah, I am being a little bit harsh. I mean I did start to feel sympathy towards Anne, because I think Ann and Fancoire in the same situation to some extent, where he both love someone else who ultimately doesn't want a bee with them. And I would agree that Francois Love of Anne is I think calling it love is probably wrong, because I think what you said was right. I'm not sure anything he does actually suggest that he is deeply in love with her, rather than he's just obsessed with the idea of being with her. I also wanted to bring up the title of the film, Davis Wife. I think that's very significant because they ives. Wife is never actually on screen and to me it represents the important thing to everyone in the film is something they don't have. So you know, Francois loves and she doesn't seem to care about him. And Love, save it or but Dave it, you're staying with his wife. So I think the significance of the title for me is that everyone is dreaming of something they don't have. Also, just one thing on the proverb of the film. There's a point where Francois says, don't you ever think of nothing, and Ann says, I'm always thinking of something. That's something doing nothing. I just want to highlight that in terms of the proverb, it may be the only time in this cycle where the proverb is actually said almost in in the film. I think so. Yeah, so it's yeah, as you mentioned it, it's interesting to to see that Francois Who's, let's say, the main character and the one to which the proverb should apply. To ask this question to to Anna. I know this is a cycle is about having every time one main protagonist and this peginist should be a female so and could potentially be seen as the main, main protagonist of this film, but I think it's the interesting to see that Francois is almost self aware, that is always doing doing things and he's mine, is not not at rest at any point and it's interesting to see that. You also ask Ann what that she what she feels about it, to see maybe to see if they're on the same level, let's say. I think is actual a common team that will get back to as you go through each of the film. And there's also something really heartbreaking in that every single person and this film or deeply in love, or is deeply obsessed rather, with someone who does not love them, and I think this is one of the more interesting things are. I think he starts to realize that the degree of obsession he displays is obviously extremely unhealthy, because once the scene between them is complete, we see one of the more heartbreaking endings in the entire cycle, where he writes up leader to Lucy, explaining what is found out and what it's on. Actually quite interesting that the woman who was with Christian wasn't his wife, nor, as most of us probably respected, another mistress. It was a sister, and this also ties into something that's almost really interesting. There were a couple of instances here which seems to be set up that characters were worse than they were just before. I. In the first scene after Francois and Lucy the part we see, and making a date with another man, making us believe she's being unfaithful to front saw, this is later completely disproved. Similarly, when the identity of the woman Christian has been walking with it...

...is revealed. Your first see a picture and for a recognizes the woman he has been following. He assumes is the wife, and is and it's come. The ant says no and she does know. Whet on it this and for a second we believe that Christian has in fact had another girlfriend on the side, but then allustion and clues leads us to understand that it was in fact his sisters. We get these two moments where characters who perhaps had additional suspicions of were proven to be innocent. I love this ending because of how bitter sweeten civil it is. He has this letter written and that he goes to her place to deliver it in person, then he goes back, he almost froze it in the trash and then he decides send me with it's them. It's really just such a simple, down to earth ending that in a way says everything. Yeah, I think the ending s in that's my favorite part probably of the whole film and I think it's a real positive judge, a push. I don't know if it's a growth from the character or if. I don't know. For me it shows a francoise is a good person overall. I think the ending of the film is pretty devastating, where as well as written up this letter explaining his discovery to Lucy and he goes to deliver it to her personally, but as he arrives, he sees her with her boyfriend and they seem so happy and he just stops and he looks at them from a distance and then they the park and the boyfriend walks past him and for a second here you almost think that he's going to start following the boyfriend, because he walks after him, but instead we see him go to a train station consider throwing away the leather but then in the end mails it. And there's so many different ways to interpret this scene. Is it from SWA getting a new type of obsession of with Lucy instead of an or is it his way of simply closing this chapter, getting distance between them and letting this be the end? I saw as the second one, Chris, that I saw in a positive way that he was letting go and him posting the letter was just his way of letting go of the see. The other thing I was thinking of. It was mentioned about how Frontsois at the start is working in some kind of post office and I think that's important because the final scene of the film both plants why posting something. So I think there's some kind of link being the start, the first scene and the final scene. When Chris was talking, I had to think of quote from James Joys. Dubliness, which I think applies to friends, was character quite well in a way which is also quite devastating. I feel like reading right now. He looked down the slope and at the base, in the shadows, was a wall of the park. He saw some figures lying those phenol and furtive lovers, loves filled with building, with despair, ignored the rectitude of his life. He felt that he had been outcast from life's feast in a way that perfectly in capsual its friends. While it is quite devastating, but it's also something bitter sweet about it, because we don't know that. Does he realize now that, okay, maybe this obsession isn't healthy and maybe I just kind of have to figure out something in my life to be different? Yeah, I also thought seeing Lucie and her boyfriend together represented something the French wire probably has never had and something he might never have as well nice quite said. Actually, I think a funny thing is that he actually, let's say, saw something you didn't want it to see twice in a single day. At first when he goes to and to leave a Rente, and when he goes back, you see her with Christan and the second time, when he goes to receive the givers a letter, she sees her with her boyfriend. But I think it's it's interesting to see that. It seems that the end of the day, he still looking from a far, you know, in a way relationships and well, it didn't really learn this lesson. In a way, honestly, my interpretation of the film was that he actually learned the lesson, that he got a clear picture of what he wanted and that, as...

...opposed to film, then poses the question, can he think of nothing? And he actually changed his life around, and I love yeah, I saw in a positive way in the sense that US it was acceptance. For me, I kind of touched on it, but him posting the letter is accepting in the situation. I feel like the ending is very open. You could reading both ways, like he has learned something or maybe hasn't learn anything. I think that's also the perfect tie over to the next film and the cycle a good marriage, because I feel it pulses the exact same questions and they can go away with exactly the same central confusion. But the proverb in this one is a little interesting. Can Be of US refrain from building castles in Spain, which, by the way, it's a really fun throwback to Davidor's wife, we're Lucy in once in the park, literally says that her boyfriend owns castles in Spain. But most likely, more serious note, this film is incredibly interesting and works on so many levels. You have a young woman with a boyfriend in Paris and she lives in the suburbs. She's in a similar situation to front sail and sends that she works and she's a student and she is at a point in her life where she doesn't really have an even footing. And the drama in this film comes from her sudden idea, barked by her at the time boyfriend, answering a call from the wife, is separated from that. She would like to get married, and this is actually a second extreme obsession, even more extreme than Francois. The film essentially poses the question can you just invent a new life for yourself, a completely new purpose. Be Subdued in this fantasy, follow this fantasy and having succeed, this story is really strange. It's really comical, is really farcical because Sabine, or lead character, just besides I will get married, and at first she doesn't even seem to care who she gets married too. It is just the basic idea of marriage. Her friend introduced her to a man and suddenly it is all about this man. This man will marry her no matter what. I find it very interesting that the film has the title a good marriage because, from what I can see and watching the film so being is not looking for a good marriage at all. So, for example, one of her quotes in the film is, like it or not, he'll be my husband. You know, she she has an idea of what she wants in a marriage and that's what she's going for, and what her concept is of a good marriage is certainly a long way away from what mine is. What's very interesting is her friend, Clarisse, seems to be the one who actually has a good marriage. It's a being, a certainly an interesting character. Maybe something that I'd like to point out that her situations again, like fans foras, it precarious because she's studying in Paris. She's just about to finish her degree in in arts, and she's living in the months and working there and, I guess, commuting her every week back and forth, and it's a really long commute, so that if it's a lot of time spent in transit. She doesn't quite have a real home anymore. She doesn't live quite at home with the family anymore, she doesn't really live in her studying place in Paris, and now she's sort of looking for something steady because right now, of course, she's, I think, almost thirty and she has to sort of startup set up a career. But of course the ounce is a quite a vattile field as well. She's in a very uncertain situation which she's nowhere in a way, and so this prospect of marriage is any extremely an Michle for her where she sort of makes up this plan where she would have a steady home in Paris and like great neighborhoods and everything. I think this is and the outset extremely interesting, but I also think the UMB in a way, it felt somewhat because it's so fasticle it's maybe Roma's most fastical film that you haven't made for me, because it's a beenus. There's a lot of reasons to emphathize with her, but from my place it as a far ast too often, in my opinion. I also thought it was very difficult amplifies. Also been because there's one moment in the film and I started feel very sorry for s been and then straight away she then hits into an older lady and is very, very good to her. So the moment where I finally felt some kind of empathy for her was taken away five seconds later. Sabine does come out as a bit character. Let's say she gets this obsession like confirm us she absolutely won't get married because of that. Well, her mind is building castles in Spain and when she needs it more, with the help of Plice, a friend in the moon, she becomes, well, almost obsessed with him in a way, which is interesting, because she talks...

...a few time to telly suit about the movement, how she's not that interested in him and she doesn't want to be the one chasing after him and he should be the one making moves. But later on the next scene we see her calling him at his office, actually trying to engage with him. At first she had an excuse, is because it concerned her work and the fact that he was looking for particular type of base that when over clients had. She actually even got into trouble for that and had to resigned from her job because of this, which is an interesting scene because it shows that she can get quite impulsive because she just create her job and even though the manager of the shop tell her that it's okay, she can stay, that she preferred to just leave and never come back. Overall, sabing is the interest in character. I can't help but feel, you know, a bit sorry for her. She probably wants to feel security, she wants to add something. There are a few discussions about a marriage throughout the film where sabing another protagonist give their point of view. Often they do not agree with one another. I think she's still a very real character because, once again, I'm sure you know everyone well. I don't know, but for me at least, we all have our mind. Sometimes won't dream building huge things that in the end get rushed in the mud because, you know, real life is not up to take in our head. Yeah, for this reason I guess I feel a bit of sympathy for her. Building on previous comments. I mean I think it was one of the weaker films in the series because to me it felt less real than the other films, because so being just didn't come across as much are as a real person. For most of the other characters in the series I could kind of understand where they were coming from, even if I didn't like characters, whereas also being, she just felt a bit more kind of cartoon character. It was just a bit too Farctico, a bit too riticulation my opinion. I think there's pot on Adam, but I think that's also why it worked for me in a way. A good marriage is the most theoretical of these six films. So mean doesn't feel as much of a character as a representation of just this idea of can you bring this absurd, bizarre fantasy into reality. And Clint Point doubt that she has so many discussions with other people. Brought the film about her fantasy, about her ideal, and what's we're thought is in is that everyone beats against her ideas. Everyone thinks her ideas are two extreme to silly. Her mother stresses just how professors are essentially from hundred years ago and wanting to step back into antiquated gender roles. And what's also interesting here is that it's two things. The first one is that her fantasy slowly stars becoming more real. At first she has this just into the absurdity of understorm get married. It doesn't matter to WHO, I just want to get married. But then when she starts speaking to her best friend clarice, and her mother, etc. This fantasy stars to evolve so soon she's also looking for love. Then she starts looking for ways it will work, way she can work. That includes going from a situation where she seems to just want to be completely dependent on the man and be a homemaker into starting to see ways that she could fulfill herself in terms of work later as well as essentially she becomes more and more grounded. However, I think the main comedy in this film comes from the fact that her fantasy is consistently disproved. Her illusions are consistently thrown in her face. If you see her speaking with Clary's she has this dream of being chased, being romanticized by a man, but Edmond, of course, it's always the one running away. He's not that interested in her, which ties him into what Adam point out earlier. Something strange happens are because at first so being says, I'm not going to chase after man, I will never chase after a man. Pass soon she looks into ways to get in touch with him and arranged the first date and she comes up with this convolute idea of selling this vast and she believes that after this she will pull back, she will be the one that is steps away from situation at the will become obsessed with her, but instead the opposite happens. She becomes obsessed with him and again doing literally obsessed, where she starts phol in his office again and again and again and again and again, to the point where, just like in the case of Front Slas, it is just clear that he wants nothing to really do with her. I think it can certainly relates to all of the Commons that happens at now, and especially with regarding what claim said. Maybe I should clarify that. From an onset. I have a lot of sympathy for her...

...situation and also for her, I guess, sort of childish dreams where she says this isn't I applied offences both very relatable and even sort of sympathetic. I think is something that's maybe often miss portrayed. Also, gold digger is, of course, I've an extremely negative pronation something like that, but I think it's, as an outside very interesting to serve dig into that and lends sympathy to all of that. Like, for incess if I think my favorite scene in the entire film is her birthday party scene, which is bites off, an amazing scene, but unfortunately it plays her like a parst again in where she sort of becomes a little girl and Roman stages her in this sort of princess dress, is of course kind of symbolic. And then place sort of electronic music, which is thinking one of the interviews you remarked. Okay, that's my idea of what people in the suburbs listen to. It's kind of condescending in a way maybe, or it feels like that almost. In one of the interviews he talks about I can a portray middle class environments in Paris, which he does great, and then maybe at a stretch, working class environments and this is a working class environment and it feels like a stretch for him. Maybe there's not something that everyone would agree with. Maybe try something along the lines of what Brune well could do, where he mistreats his subjects so much that the audience will send up for them, but I don't feel like that's quite what comes across here. Maybe one good example of where the film sort of fall short. That's a very nice frame of her in the subway, but she looks out the window, but I don't think this reverse shut or actually see her point of view. And actually that's sort of what's lacking in the film. What Romo is usually great at its situating, sort of his actions, just where we are, whereas in this film we get a lot of talking just not enough environmental shots. I think maybe some of the film is a shortcoming in the cinematography, because what work great in Aviag his wife, which was such an immediate story, doesn't work so well here, where it's more read out over a longer period, where this immediacy and this claim cinematography doesn't do it quite since justice were shot by the same guy, of course, as the aviate is wife. They are not you teach and I feel like among the cinematographers for the comedicscent proverbs, he certainly strikes me as at least sophisticated and it's very plain, and that doesn't lead to this film a great service. I agree with that part. I think that out of these six films, a good marriage is the one that is the least visually interesting, and that's quite unfortunate. I agree entirely, and that I sort of what to keeple most of why I say it's negative. I like the film quite a lot. Spoil of warning. Well, this real interesting here, though, is that bold David, his wife and a good marriage has the exact same ending. They play out slightly differently, but that set up is I then they go. Our lead character confronts their counterpart inside of a closed room. That goes on for far longer than you would imagine, is including one of the characters consistently trying to leave, and this back and forth where more and more of the characters are revealed until all of their motivations are laid there it's not shorter, and there it is. Why he was about twenty, twenty five minutes. Here it is about ten minutes. But what it does is identical. It will see, is the exact same degree of tension. And this this the fact that these two films end in the same way and all sorts of note were written at the same time. Romer had both scripts ready side by side in the starter site. I think this connection is really interesting to me. It also ties in with what we talked about at very beginning of opposing forces clashing and then finding a synthesis. The ending of the film is also a little bit optimistic, let's say, because, even though it won't work with its more the film end will sabine in a train and she noticed a guy that she also so at the very beginning of the film in the same the same situation, is the same train. So the ending, compared to the editor's wife, where I felt like the ending was a bit bigning metic, at least with a good marriage, I think the ending is a bit open, is think, and maybe Sabine will be able to after all find what she wants and be able to get married with that person she still haven't met on the train. I think one of the really interesting things there is that, similarly to the way day, which is life, ended with from swap potentially learning from this, we follow this top process a little bit further in a good marriage, where after her bizarre illusion of this perfect relationship to damn, who she had met perhaps three times, comes crashing down. She storms out of his offers. She's completely embarrassed and she goes b back to her friend and suddenly her expectations and...

...her goals and her perspective has changed. Previously she thought that nothing could have worked with her ex boyfriend Simon. This time she realizes that that was perhaps quite a reasonably good relationship. She stops talking in equally extreme terms, and this dimes back to a conversation with her motor a little bit earlier in the film, where her mother claims that he's going from two extremes, one in that sense being simply being with people without the intention of perhaps ever becoming anything more, into a complete obsession with marriage. Here at the end she seems almost well rounded, which is a very interesting and also very positive ending in many ways, even though of course she has been utterly and completely embarrassed like this, also at the ending. I remember reading in the interviews and Roman said for in the ending signifies that he is ready for a new adventure. To me that sort of demonstrates that he's not intentionally during her in a very negative way, though in the film sometimes comes across that way. That's he doesn't have such a vettering portrayal of her. Maybe this is not necessarily intentional his part. All the time, I think he suddenly wants us to feel for her as well as I don't know if the film is always successful as as I think this perspective is speaking of. It is also really interesting because I suppose a question in the same way as the question of front saw is what is their next step? Did Front swall learn anything from his experience with and Lucy? Will he be able to move on and find love? And here will sap been, because the first time I saw this film, my reaction at the ending when she sees this man and she smiles at him at the train will oh my God, here we go again. Please know he's going to be as obsessed. It's going to be a repeat of the previous story. But this time, when I saw the ending, I thought she has learned from this. She no longer has this impossible ideal or is substurte fantasy, and she will actually be able to find love. Also, key difference at the ending is that she just meets a random stranger who she doesn't know anything about it. He just smiled at her. So it shoots me obviously different words with Edmund, she knew all the time that he's a lawyer, he's quite wealthy, he lives in a very nice neighborhood in in Paris, and I think that times in a lot with her emotives throughout the film as well. But I think on a Sanda it's something that I don't think necessarily makes you view her in a bad way because she's she is sort of in this precarious it situation and she sees this as an possible escape. Perhaps. Yeah, I feel like the endings a lot more open, where she just he just smiles at her, and that's more spontatingous, more free, less bound to these obsessions. As you say. I don't know if it's necessarily learning or if it's just some kind of can I go on about this completely different without necessarily having having taken in a deeper lesson, but I think it's will certainly be different the future. This will tie us over to the next film. But there's also an interesting observation we had here, which was that in David or his wife, he consistently walk from train stations and into train stations, but we never see him on a train. In a good marriage, we always see the being on the train. She's always traveling, she's always moving, and I considering that Roamer wrote these two films at the same time and given how particular he was, I really think that he's trying to say something about these characters and stay they're in, in the other words, front small, not being able to think of nothing, always walking but never been able to move on, and sub being always traveling but not being able to truly settle down. And this Motif of trains and moving will continue through the remaining for films and as well. Another interesting thing about the ending, I think, is when you look at the proverb associated with a good marriage, which is comnion of US refrain from building castles in Spain. And now that I think about it, maybe the ending, where there is this one guy sitting in front of her that we already saw before, it smies at her, she's mines at him, and maybe from that simple smile or that simple look or simply the fact that you were twice in the same the same train, maybe Sabine once again won't be able to refrain herself from building castles in Spain and so starting to build this relationship with this stranger she knows nothing of. I think it's also interesting how the proverb is frame. Can any of us, in other words, Robert could be tried to involve all of us and ask us the question if we also live inside of a fantasy world or if you also have any of these are fantasies, which I think...

...carries US perfectly over to next film, Pauline at the beach, where the characters are literally away from vocation, and the proverb in this film is a wagging tongue bite itself. And on the surface this is a fairly simple film. A woman and her cousin or on vacation. They meet up with a man that the older cousin used to have a relationship with before she got married is currently in the process of getting divorced, and they meet an older man with him that, so we say, presents himself as a little bit of a ladies man, and a lot of things start to happen. Tallistically, this film is very different from the too previous obviously we're no longer in a city or a village. We are at right beautiful beaches. But the composition also feels a lot more harsh, it feels a lot more inhuman, and it does this well, building a strange verb of adulthood around or lead character, pauline, the younger cousin, who in most of the film can be said to be more of an onlooker, who, similarly to the two previous films, as an experience with the opposite sex. I'm a huge fan of punning as a beach. It is for a long time being one of my very favorite Roman films, and I think another reason it looks so different is because this time a Roman is back, with an Estra and meander us, who collaborated with him on basically all of his feature films, from Black Collection News up until the mckey of Oh Brood. All of these films right you have se is quite sophisticated compositions, often working one uder supernatural light, and I think what I had a most about, I'm interest is his simplicity, how he's so economical and how he threw very simple facts sort of transforms the visual narrative through the interesting how playing the vision many ways plays back to Eric Romer's moral tales, but in a flipped way. So what we see here is that pauline and her cousin Marion meet up with these two men, including the older cousin Nova if we will, and his name is Henry and he really encompasses all of the pretentious, shown mystic characters that roamer was mocking in the moral tales, and we see him start a relationship with Marian. I think it's really interesting how this relationship is shot. It feels almost grotesque, especially the new scene where is just ripping her clothes off and it feels like your status is feels robotic. It feels like a scene from Robert Preston film. A couple of things evolved here. For starters, Pauline doesn't like Henry at all. She thinks it's a bit of a creepy think. She thinks these two old and she wants, my own to reconnect with her previous boyfriend, Pierre, and this is also where we start seeing some connections with the aviator, because Pierre is obsessed with Marian. He has the same longing eyes. The Shame Ay and plot structure actually follows a relatively similar pattern, where the midsection of film actually is this detective or disoluting into whether or not Henry has been faithful. The difference therees that we know that from the start he often didn't faithful, which does feel like Rome is flipping the premise of David is life. There's no longer to spend this, there's no longer mystery. You're simply following Pierre try to figure out what actually happened. Yeah, I feel like in this piece the tensions much more derived from the interpersonal relationships, because I feel like, unlike one of the other comedies in proverbs, it's much more an ensemble piece where we saw follow up aline and Marianne and go on vacation together to start in the Normandy, and then they sort of meets here, who's not rean's old friend and who sort of in love with her, but she's not as interested in him at all and he's quite idealistic and she's a bit more take it as it comes. So she's also in some way idealistic and she falls for another who was, of course, this entirely free spirited guy or doc pretends to be with a says, okay, let's see entire world of broots itself and sort of hast his attitude. I can. My House is your house, use it as you want. There's a very nice scene where a lean she also meets up with the guy at Sulvan there and they sort of have a holiday Romans, which I feel like is really what is at the heart of the film, but more on that later. There's a very nice scene just after they meet at the beach, they go to his place where they put on an LP and then at first shot is sort of an esthetic white shot of them setting around there and then they...

...start dancing and the camera so he starts swaying around with them. Then there's I think, one other shot of them dancing, a close up. Then or he comes in and then it's a wide of them going up. So it's just this entire one and a half minute scene in free shots, which is extremely economic and puts us directly in there with the music and the swaying camera. It's supremely romantic and supremely or sort of at presenting us, is smoot one summer day, mood, free spirited love and everything, and then they go up. or Re meets with Mary and tells her about that and then they sort of interrupted before anything much else happens afterwards this, but with Marion and only and then Lousette, who a re cheats with, because he sort of he just chases after all, go sort of it doesn't feel very, very bound necessarily, though. He knows it would hurt Mary, and then he tries to hide it and through losette hiding with Suvan or to, he pushes them into the bathroom and then pretense is so it was them who were together and not rely and lose it and spruce sort of this poline becomes initiated into their love Games, which is to me really what is at the harvest film. It's sort of an anti coming of age film, if you want. In most coming of age films, for instance also in Maurice Pier lets and I'm more, which is made around the same time, which is a wonderful film, where at the start she sleeps with some tailors and that sort of initiates a coming of age, and here's much just the opposite. Pauline doesn't sleep with so but she still loses her innocence, not by sleeping with some guy but by being initiated into the Loft Games of the adults. I think it's also very interesting to see that all sex and romance and explanations are gone in the same the same place in all his house to Tak a bit more in that only character. It's not a character right particularly liked, even though more or less take responsibilities, let's say, for his action towards the end of the film. He seems to me like a sad character in a way. He said it himself that he doesn't really have any many house. He prefers to say is divorced the as a child that he sees from time to time, but not that often. Overall, it seems like a very sad character who has no connection with anyone because he doesn't really seem to be able to do it. It doesn't p probably doesn't really want to do it either. Spoken a lot of beauty hair, but all the main things that consistently came back to me was just how still the falls this beaute the felt throughout the entire film. It feels very much like this. A contrast will between pauline and the adults. She's a way the wisest character and really a performance of Amanda LNG like that amazes me in this film because she seems so so sort of pure and naive and natural and sort of right at hand, and she portrays that incredibly well. Again, she's only fifteen. The actress as well. And at the starts there's a scene where all of the characters say, sort of talk about their love ideals. So Marie and Pierre and no all or pauline is sort of left out. She's just standing around. I think she is in front of the fireplace, and often the camera leaves her out as well, so she's not in the frame the lots of time. And then at the end Marionn pushes her just to say something to this even though it really doesn't interest her, to just talk about love as a provate pass it. You know, talk too much, you hurt yourself. I feel like it's also what happens later on that all of the talk about their affairs ends up damaging their affairs, all other talk about the love life. So they've forgotten and I feel that with pauline and so and no way it's innocent. But what makes it not innocent is pauline getting involved in these love Games, and I think that's a fascinating inflection on the sort of on the genre of the coming of age film, as usually it's much different. Surfaces symbolic acts of having sex, but here it's the opposite. It doesn't happen, but she still loses her innocence. It's not nature, as it spoils her, but society. When interesting thing, all that money, that she pushed green to join the conversation they were having and to give her opinion on the love and it seems that it's not the only thing that Marijung is pushing green to do. It seems like she's also trying to get offer back, because there obviously still in love with her. And it seems like the Solution Marion found is to tell Pierre to try and seduce screen. So it's interesting. Were the morality, let's say, of trying to have someone a bit older, trying to have sex with a fifteen, sixteen years old, even though I am not sure Marion was thinking about about sexy, since she was just trying to get care of her back, as I said, and to give him a new session. And why you would be trying to...

...seduce pauline she would be alone to be able to do whatever she wants is only, in my opinion, the fund do something quite radical here, because it Jose us the film Pauline's perspective, and she said in both film and Literature, sort of fifteen year old goals are very much nice group. That really sort of the intellectual or the emotional center of a film. That and often the sort of played for ours, kind of like Roma does in a good marriage with this section that sexually close to thirty, but he plays her like a girl and here's much the opposite. Were Pauline. She's much wiser than all of the adults and small, much more easier to sympathize with her. And also the as you say, is the relationship between Pierre and pauline is very interesting, because Marion tells here to try to Seduce Pauline, and I agree entirely with with you about the motives and stead of how she reacts to that. And it's obvious that pea it's not really very interested in doing that. But what does ensue is sort of there's a genuine friendship developing between Pierre and Pauline, where it's very interesting how to portrayed. You rarely see that in films. That their sort of they have a lot of ways of friendship. That's sort of on an eye level. Yes, it's not really the like a mentor for Pauline, sort of someone who also very valuable things. He suddenly feels like he's sort of has to protect her or and take her home later on when when he brought her someplace. But then pauline speaks up for herself and says, I can know that's actually now I'm not with my parents and I want to make my own decisions. And I love this perspective that Roman takes in this film where he emphasizes with Aline so much that he says I can know fifteen year old say they have a mind of their own, and he empathized with that fruit portraying her in that way of sort of giving her very much an eye level with the adults and sort of taking her to the table. Yeah, there's something I like very much about the film. I saw pauline really being the moral center of the film. You had all of the older characters engaging in really quite bad activity. Is I mean Henry was sleeping with everyone he could. Basically here was obsessed to Marian and we had this crazy situation or marian trying to hook up. Following them, Pierre, and I thought following really shown through as a moral center. She acted, in a rule, a better way, I would say, to all of the adults, even despite her young age, or maybe because of her young age. Actually like Lucie in Aviator's wife, I think she was one of the really strong characters in the early films of this series. I think it's an interesting connection bringing up there, which is that essentially both Davids wife and lean at the beach, the adult, largical conclusions are in some park coming from a child. And also really happy that Clem cleared up some of the slightly sleezier, scarier aspects of Marion trying to get here and bullieve together, because that's one thing that was, let's say, felt a little bit out of it. They kind of, I would talk about earther about this, confronting you about what's going on in France, because in aviator's wife too, there was an old woman try to get an adult man to go for a fifteen year old. So we were a little bit taken aback. I think she just wanted to get p are away from her and was quite selfish about how she went about it. I think she also trusted Pierre not to treat owing badly, whereas ginger, who ends up a folling. It's a complete stranger. But certainly Marion has very questionable models in the film which she supposed to be looking after. I mean, even though she's cousin, it's more I can annie kind of relationship. I would say then, a cousin cousin lationship. The only thing I thought was somewhat interesting in terms the thing pauline as the moral center of the film was, of course, that the younger boy that she gets entangled with in the very first meeting says he has a girlfriend at home, which he still starts his romantic relationship with him, so that they're always these counterpoints to every single hypothesis were trying to make of the films which she gets this Romers until this working perfectly well. There's a contradiction to everything, I think specifically, and that scene sort of one sort of portrays it in a way. So it wouldn't be very serious. But one thing that Adams come and made me think about was that perhaps the something that happens back and Russ almost but Rama portraying his younger characters, his fifteen year old girls, as a moral centers and the wisest characters in the films, something about society sort of spoiling the adult characters. Spoil a warning. This is an interesting time with the ending too, because the ending to pauline at the beach is essentially the exact same ending as we saw in the aviators wife and in a good marriage, the counter polls are meeting in...

...a closed face. But the interesting thing here is that it is not, say, Mariam Meeting Henry or Pierre, it is pauline alone in a room with the three men in the film, her young sem my boyfriend, Pierre and Henry, and it plays out exactly the same way. Some characters trying to leave, some characters trying to stay, and the scene is prolonged and prolonged and prolonged and it has this French conclusion where pauline, seeming frustrated about Pierre trying to stand up for her and saving her, stays with Henry and Pierre finally leaves with her set my boyfriend, and they're out and pauline is left with Henry, which in many ways it's her counterpart. She is the youngest, he is the oldest and to me this character really just represents the male equal male perversion. He's essentially everything about the male world that should scare or put off a young girl. So, from my perspective at least, the film has her meet with the three men in her life, three different personas, if you will, all with different flaws, all with different antagonisms, and these antagonisms solving themselves or resolving themselves, until she's left with the main antagonists and they have a heart to heart. And it's really interesting is these two characters start to communicate and pulling gets a bit for glimpse in the inside of an adult mind. And just one more point on this. That scene when Henry comes into Pauline's room while she's sleeping is fifteen d go sleeping and he's in his s and he starts climbing on top of her bed kissing her late. That that is just so again newly unnerving and is just so good to see him checked off in that way. Yeah, absolutely, it was very satisfying. Park to see kids in the chest brings the only woman that envy hasn't flat twins, and I think it's that should be some output to put in credits. That she was able to see, even though she's young, and experience, and this adding slightly more to how fleecy Henry actually is. In the early scenes he is with his daughter, is young six seven year old daughter, maybe even younger, who he does the Bandon sleeping at home to go out the park and try to have sex with girls. Who says that. It's very interesting comment about his daughter that I still remember. Greadulately when, a certain point he says when she's old enough she can uproot herself. We should have encompasses his character, which is in a way he's a hypocrite, but in another way perhaps he really lives this way. You talked about the ending and of course the very ending is when they close the fence, which is a book end of where the first scene started, and in a way this shuts the vacation of like almost a medically seals it off from the daily life. In a way this makes all of this love game sort of allowed. Everything is allowed and vacation, and it feels like rumor sort of criticizes that, but it also works so wonderfully because of the way he put portrays the space, because he's able to. I know in the start we talked about how Rama is very secretive about his personal life, and he justified that in a way by saying that it allows him to go in public spaces without people noticing him. So he's sort of an invisible because no one knows him. So he can go in a public space with a very small crew and film a scene there, like at the beach, and it seems very likely because it is. It's just put in a place of daily life where he stayed to see scenes, which lent them so, so much for those of a little just by using what is there, it sort of gives them his films a lot of production volue and a lot of life to have these spaces inhabited like that, and I think that's something that's very wonderful about this film, that all of these, I don't know, silly and fetallistic love games they sort of punctuated by the very beautiful endience of the space and, in a way, the hypocrisy of the characters. It's juxtaposed by the serene nature around them, which is something that's quite wonderful and points to sort of a long lasting theme of Roma where he has almost an obsession with nature, though he can't really he can't really live there. He's not the guy. He likes to live in the city still, and that's that's an interesting country. That goes through his entire for microphy sources are lying desire to go back to nature, but then it's just to the formification, and in a way it's funny. I think this final scene, with closing of the vacation, also ends up with an odd fulfillment of the proverb where Mario and at this point really recalled that everything's been happening has been a complete force. My own is still completely unaware that Henry cheeked on her. At this point. He does thinks he left. She doesn't know anything what's been going on. Pauline, at this point knows everything. And what actually happened is...

...that she turns to pauline and she says, how about we both believe that it was the other's boyfriend that she did. Essentially she says that she believe that it was pauline's young boyfriend that had sex, which was that, and pauline can believe it was Ari that has sex, utely said, and that way both of them can be happy, and this seems like such interesting inclusion to the proverb. Are Working Tongue bites itself, because it does seem in a way that Mari own buys into this. She believes that this taught you more about things, about understanding things, will result in pain, and I guess the question has been drive off is will it? Is the proverb true, and what extent is it true? Regarding them, the ending and the beginning, I think it's a nice gesture to say that this is pulling, who opened the gates and then later on closed it, as if she is the one controlling everything. The fact that she's one deciding, went to open the fence and went to close it with indicate that maybe she's the one that controlling out of that and who's above everything, which also would sties and where with herd knowing the truth while not know what doesn't. And she's also the person who leadterally ends the vacation they were supposed to have stay. They're much longer, but bullin tells Mario on to end it and for them to leave together. And I think these three first films of the comedies and proverb cycle praise a really interesting hole, a hole where in the first film a man chases after a woman, in the second a woman chases after a man in a Turd. We essentially see all of these realities at once, with a major confrontation between a young woman and an old summer sleecy showing the stinct man. It really feels like a nice way to tie up our very first half of our comedies and proverbs episode. I really hope you've enjoyed listening to us and I will join us again for part two, where it will go through full moon in Paris, the Green Ray and, of course, my girlfriend's boyfriend, and also tie over all of the recurring teams and motifs of the series and see what the final contradiction and the final resolution truly was, which I believe will surprise you. Thank you for listening and join us again soon. You have been listening to talking images, the official podcast of ICM. For USCOM.

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