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Talking Images
Talking Images

Episode 43 · 9 months ago

Claire Denis: From Unspoken Longing to Robert Pattinson in Space

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Claire Denis went from being the master of unspoken longing to shooting explicit sex and violence - holding next to nothing back. In this episode, we will take a closer look at her defining works, marvel over the sheer variety, explore her off-beat genre experiments and dissect why so many top actors want to work with her.

You are listening to talking images, the official podcast of ICM Forumcom. Welcome back everyone, I'm Chris and in this episode we will be taking a closer look at the career and films of one of the most respected contemporary directors, claire the Kny, and see not just how her style has evolved, but how free she appears to be in terms of try and completely new and off the cuffs experiments, including sending Robert Pattinson on a Suicei admission into space. This is a woman from whom you will never quite know what you're going to get, though some pretty clear brush strokes have emerged. It's probably fairest to describe clear the needs as a bit of a minimalist, often with sensual and even steamy films building a focus on tortuous lust inter youth. This was usually all through temple quiet inferences, with passion never quite shown, but rather lurking under the surface. And when I say under the surface, I mean so close to it at the subtext is right there in front of you, ready to grab your hand and pull you into the world pool of primal instincts. However, while the needs got her start within the art house scene, she's not afraid of vampires and spaceships. Her Wings and gubble led trouble every day has become a cult classic, but our more recent film, highlife with Robert Pattinson's possibly her most successful, or at least most widely seen, because if you look at some of the critique and audience reactions, that's not going too well, including a five point eight on IMDB and a rotten audience score at rotten tomatoes. Mind you, the critics were far more positive, but even here they were mixed. In this episode you might find mixed reactions among us as well, because the mix is often what is exciting. We need daring directors that follow their own vision, and it is simply incredible and exciting to see just how much this vision has seemingly changed and altered since her soft, semi autobiographical debut, while still so much has stayed the same. Unfortunately, we can get to every single one of her eighteen feature films to date, nor, if you're listening to this in the future, any of the film she's released since. Instead, we will focus in on her debut chocolate, her perhaps greatest critical darling Beau trave her cult classic vampire flake trouble every day, the small, quiet but still explosive Friday night and the quiet art house hit thirty five shops of rum and yes, I know I mentioned high life earlier. That's been disgust already in our space exploration episode, but it's probably going to make an appearance here as well, and so make several of her older films, but without much more I do. Let me this introduce my two fabulous cohosts, Tom and Mata, and just started off a pretty easy question because obviously had an impression of clary going into this episode and we've all been watching and rewatching quite a few the need films over the last few weeks. So what was your impression after he's going into this episode and has that in any way change? Hi, Chris, I'm at you from PMS. My impression of Kendony was that of a director that I didn't really get. So I appreciated all of the films I've seen from her, I never connected with them that much and preparing for this episode I found more to connect with in the films, but I'm still basically at the same point. I have more understanding of her as a director, but every time I watch one of the films, there's one point where I think all this is going to be the one that's Knox it on for me, and it doesn't really do that and I don't exactly know why. It's all interesting that we can explore that today then. Yeah, how about your thumb? So funny enough, Chris. I've got a very similar interaction with clad knee films as Mattia has before the episode and actually only seen two of her films with mixed responses. So I was open and eager to see more of her work and I have really enjoyed going through all of her films that have watched in preparation for the episode, but none of them have particularly resonated with me in a way that's made...

...me think this is a filmmaker for me. As Matteo says, I've got a respect for a work. She's clearly a talented director and there's some very good films and they're just none that have particularly struck a chord of me. But it's certainly been a fun ride. So I'm excited to discuss the film's father now. That's interesting. So I guess I'm the only fan in the room, which is going to read them. Interesting discussion as suppose on my part. I'm not sure if my view of the need has changed. I think I'm slightly more appreciative of her minimustman subtext, and that was before. I think I get a little bit more out of her films and on top of that, I think I'm also able to pick up a little bit more of the what can you call it, pumps in some excitement in the MINIMALISLM to to the different extent, which I think something we're going to talk about, especially with Friday night. So something that was really exciting on my rewatchers free. But yeah, so it's going to be an uphill battle for me here. I know that both of you watched her debut, chocolate, for the first time for this episode, which is definitely one the first software films. It's a large autobiographical film and while there's a lot of traits we come to know, it's no underneath this filmography. I think it's also little bit separate. I would love to hear your views new experiences going into her debut. So Chukula is an interesting film because it's obviously very personal film. For clardy plots really closely resembles Clini's own life, right, growing up in colonial Africa and then going back to it as a young adults and experiencing that's very differently. Well. So that's the basic prop of the film, but there's also a lot of elements that are, we get, appropriate for a first film for her, right the fact that the film starts with this scene that's on the beach and you have this this woman, was the main character, who is looking at his father and his son who are on the beach, and there's a lot of focus on their bodies, on the way she's looking at their bodies, and that's basically the maybe the central theme of all of CDNY's Fami rights, the human bodies and what they provoke in us, and so I think that that scene, I think, is striking in the sense that it's it's already there. It's a film that I reacted to, I guess, similarly to most of her films. I find it perhaps more interesting to talk about and to think about then to actually watch. And that's not to say that I don't appreciate it, that's not to say about the don't like to him. I do like it, but I don't know that there's a point where I want more from her films and I don't know that it's fair of me. Maybe it's just what she's doing is not necessarily what I'm most interested in. It's interesting intellectually, but I always have trouble engaging with her characters and I think maybe on the one hand I really appreciate the way she does not rely on dialog much right, but on the other hand sometimes it can create a bit of a wall between the characters and the audience. I suppose where the kind of enigmas. I don't know that there's a balance that I think she finds better in future films that in Chuicula, especially the character of putting. He's a bit of an enigma throughout and it makes sense because it's from the perspective of this this young woman, but I kind of wish at times, and often inclearnice films, that I would have a better understanding of the characters, and it's doesn't always come. But being said, the more themes of her watch, the more I feel like I get her films a bit more, so they do the few years I looks good eye and understand it better. I like how you refer to Prote as an enigma, because that's one of the things that I noted across most of dense films, which is that she likes to explore character driven pieces about enigmatic individuals, and that works and in hand with the fact that her stories become progressively more visual and there's less focus on dialog and exposition, more about feelings and sensations rather than focus on the narrative. Now, shockler is one of her most conventional features. It's obviously here finding her feet with her debut, before she goes on to experiment more with the form and the way she delivers a stories across the medium of film. It's quite a tender autobiographical film. Now to white woman's return to a child at home in Cameroon and, as you say, Mattia, it's driven by here memories of a servant named Prote who took a shine to the young girl, and it's almost anyway it could be seen as a tender love story, because there's a natural and innocent love between the young girl in this servant, but then at the same time you've got some...

...semblance of a adult love triangle going on in the background, which explores the societal rules of the time and the prejudice at play which prevents love blossoming between prote and the girl's more where, there's a quote by a Roger Eve it which I love, which says it's about how racism can prevent two people from looking each other straight in the eye and how they punish each other for the pain that causes them. and that ties into the notion of lost as well, which is something we see across many of the films were going to discuss today. So I'm similar in a similar place to Mattheo. I appreciated the film. I enjoyed it. Didn't think it was amazing or groundbreaking, but it's nonetheless it's it's a solid debut and one which offers lots to audiences that are willing to explore this tantalizing world. That's a well certain I think it's this conflict between class and the race, but most of this kind of youthful innocent and the lack of comprehension that makes this film really interesting. And I think they nake my hair is also in part of it. Don't actually know what going on. We see part of the this low triangle, for instance, being see this kind of vagrant term my religious flirty rifter who comes to the rich house and the tries to Douce the mistress. Not something that's relatively clear, but that's a side plot and as a side character, if we will. What's really interesting here is that there's this kind of unspoken potential of love, lust or something else between prote and this young girl's mother. And we don't know if it's the mother lasting after him and trying to force him into really uncomfortable situations. We don't know if it's him lusting after her and trying to, you know, get closer to her. We don't know if it's mutual without it could even be that nothing is technically going on, but this just this strong sense of lust and potential, love and longing. It's all they're bubbling under the surface and we don't quite know when. I think this is one of those things that clear the needs does so well and most they have almost not perhaps not unique to her, with one of the things that she does spasically does more noticeably than most all the directors, is just building on this kind of Nique mind letting us try to read into it. Feeling lost and almost feeling in this in this film, especially feeling this the place of this little girl, but also as adults being all of these signs and it's a very strong experience, especially when it builds in wit that class and raise relations and you see the power structures there and again it's all from perspective this young girl who doesn't quite get it, leading to some matters really very powerful emotional scenes. I think it's interesting that Jom we thought to the same as tender, as I think there is some tenderness right to be between the daughter and put it definitely that relationship, but as far as the desire goes, I don't see a lot of tenderness there. I think it's a lot about the power dynamics, right, and obviously the race elements of it, but also the fact that you know it's the master and the servants, right, and so that's obvious. Did Not the Porson? I make is quite obvious. Yeah, exact. I think actually that you mentioned that you could interpret the relationship between the the mother and and put it in many different ways. I guess. I don't know if there's desire on his part, but on her about it seems quite clear to me that's there is that she doesn't act on it, that she's made very uncomfortable by it, but that it's there. At least. That's to me. What's done is is communicating, and that's in the end, this unspoken fact leads to unresolvable situation right with at least for her, that's resolved by sending him away, inevitably right that she cannot really deal with it. I agree with that Matth here and as far as I'm what I bring up the tenderness because that's the relationship between prote and the young girl, but it's it also offers a nice contrast to the difficult law that's harbored by her mother, while the loss and the love for prote and it gives the impression that if these two admits in different circumstances where there is less of an issue about power, dynamics, race except then it may have blossomed into into a love. And I think that's what what kind of Nice is exploring now, and you know she often doubts into characters, dreams and desires, and this is kind of the start of that, where she begins to explore the world of lost and what it means for people...

...when they are fighting against that lost. It's interesting you see that way, Tom because to me I would not say that that's at all that. It could be in the different circumstances, right, they could have a Romans. It seems to me like it's maybe have a more cynical view of it, that it is very much linked to the power dynamics that she that that that is what creates the desire that. Yeah, I guess, like all of these films, I think it's there's a lot open to interpretation, right. That's one of the benefits of the way she approaches things, but it's very mysterious at times, but also leaves a lot to the audience. Yeah, exactly. I mean you have seens, for instance, where protast clearly looking at the mode for long periods of time and you have alth of this scene why he stepping in to try to essentially stop the man was attempting to Seduce Sir. So there's a lot of different things we can read into that, whether or not that's that him being generally protective or if it's him expressing his type of passion for her, or if they actually are in our relationship, if there actually is something going on behind the scenes that this young girl is not seeing an understanding. So that that's why I see it, Lissie. There's multiple different interpretations there and I think that's always makes it more interesting for me to try to unpack what could be happening under the surface. It's nice that none of the films are really clear caught in that regard and they're open to interpretation. So you can, you know, bring your own views to the film try and unpack what what happens, and that's quite a nice aspect of her films because, you know, the very visual, animatic. There's lots going on. So there's lots of different ways that you can interpret a low we share similar concepts on the main messages that she wants to bring across. Perhaps the interpretation of characters in their actions can be understood differently and that's a nice part of your film. I think it's as the one part we haven't the talked about there, which is that a large portion of the film is literally declared in these standing not quite understanding the past either. So you have this woman named France, perhaps quite ironically, quite obviously, traveling to know this ex colony where she grew up and seeing life they're not quite managing to connect with the past, which is as she's going to try to find her own home, but in the end we're not doing sure if she did. And I think there is this one thing which I want spoil between the WHO as a young girl and prote where he does something that breaks her trust and she is so confused. You see that there's a degree of pain for Protey as well, or at least something that led him to that point. And when she comes back and tries to perhaps understand her past and understand their relationship of France to Africa, she's she seems if the conclusion seems to be that it is not almost, not quite possible, that something is still missing in that equation. So that is this contemporary context as well and an historical context that tries to merge and make sense of the experiences. No, this could just be clear than he's trying to make sense of her own experiences and getting some kind of clarity in her own life. But I think there's even more bubbling under the surface and even more a bit things we can try to interpret them bring into the film just from that. Yeah, and there's a seam that's also becoming in her films that you mentioned here, which is the stranger in a strange land, and not so much with it actually the main story of this colonial family, because they're really in very isolated place. But it's more with the adult clearness standing right that really she really feels that, even though she's coming back to where she grew up or the country she grew up in, she does feel very much like a stranger for the obvious reasons, and all of the character made, maybe you could say all of the guy doesn't clear an e see, feel like they don't belong where they are. I mean that's maybe the auto big seems she's always exploring. Yeah, and I guess we can really spoil it, but I feel like the way the sin and is is perhaps a littrue unsatisfying to me, and maybe she's not trying to be satisfying that. It feels a bit like they are flet's hear that, are not as explored as as they maybe could happen. I mean to me I completely agree that that's what happened. That's into these trends are not fully explored. Reason, my eye like it, it's because, essentially, that that's at least I feel like that's part of the commentary and part of this character to that there is something that almost can be explored and that she's missing the tool set or perhaps just because of her upbringing, because of who she is, because of the power relations through history, there is just something he can't really connect with it. So I feel like the ending still speaks to that, but I can clearly see that it's not exactly a clear cut ending that complete the story or adds in some more knowledge that,...

...you know, can tie everything together. I think that's actually a very good way of seeing the ending. I yeah, I think you your explanation of it makes me appreciated with bit more. I think that makes sense, but the not being able to reach the past. But yeah, I think such is actually ending seems better for me. I know that you put it up happy here. That and to move on then to perhaps most respected and acclaimed film and skipping over a decade of her filmography, which is still filled with great and interesting in the exciting films, we're going to go all the way from nine eight eight two, nine undred and ninety nine spew traveil, which kind of runs the risks of alienating it's audiences that even larger degree, especially for those who do not pay attention, as at face value there's little to know story and little more than outlines of the characters. As we enter the regiment of the legionnaires, of the Foreign Legion, based once again to where in Africa? Possibly the booty, and here we see once again clear the need is in Africa. She's looking at white people and this kind of old, lasting power in Africa. It's clearly a team she's stretch returns to from time to time. We see it again in white material as well. This is something that clearly needs is really eager and interested in exploring. But here there's also a lot more subtext, a lot more deem and a lot more of a breakdown, or shall we say that classic Legioneer tropes. I'm not very sure if you should kind of spoiled the very obvious subtext here and what's going on, but I guess we can say that it's seems at least to be a bit of a love triangle between the startlant, the commander and a new recruit, but nothing's ever done about it. It's once again, you know, longing looks visual expressions. If you will, and it's bit of a deconstruction here because just looking at the title, view the rail, I mean it's quite clearly a play on you know, you gus, which has been adapted several times, including with Gary Cooper, and it is this kind of romantic classic heroism and this is Romantization of the foreign leasion that happens both in front and old Hollywood, and here she is unpacking all of it and giving us something very different. So what are your views on you traveil. So what have I is the first treddition I saw. It's interesting because you mentioned there being an obvious team in it and I think you I don't think it was spoiled to say you're talking about the homo it writicism of the them and because it was the first cut and you seem I saw I was aware that that this was the thing, but I wasn't sure really that what the thing was about. Now, looking back on it, I think it's pretty clear. But because I know how she works better, I think I think that is definity what's going on in the same but seeing it for the first time, it wasn't that clear to me. It was definitely a possible interpretation but but not that. Yeah, and you mentioned the kind of the myth of the of the legionnaire, and I haven't seen that Guy Coupa film Bush rests, but there's a song in front that is very well known, that was sung by it did be a first Muley Jonnaire with his love song to a Legionary, and it was sung, interestingly then, by SCAN's book. It's so I think that maybe she it wasn't in an inspiration for her right because obviously to man singing a love song to a man. And Yeah, in a sense it's kind of an obvious subject for her. But she's fascinated with bodies, with desire, and it's forbidden desire, right, at least in this phase of her career. We skipped over the dances, but I think her later films are not necessarily as much about forbidden desire. But definitely Shokula and but have I are both about that and they are both in some sense about repressed desire, and what we see in but Hawaii is that we first desire. I mean Nuel could like this film because repression, repression does not lead two good things. And at the end there's this yeah, this fay very famous ending of the film that I guess I want Scorel but it's very memorable and it's kind of the liberation in a sense, and a film that I think is the best film cludy has ever made. The best scene. I mean it's not mine my favorite film, but I think that scene in particular maybe because it's so satisfying to see her do something that she never does write. Her characters are never that free and never that relaxed as this character is in that final scene. And Death is also maybe way it's so...

...striking, such a contrast. I think that's why that that's ending is so is always worth's talk about this thing right. It's always words what people bring up. It's an interesting companion piece to shockle that because you can see the development of Denis to style and both of the film's deal with memories and the post colonialism in Africa. In films are often about crossing boundaries, whether to do with race or sexuality and Forbidden Act and in both of these films, as you mentioned in the intro quiz, it's kind of bubbled away under the surface at this stage in her career. Where is later on she does go to show these actions in more detail and as well as the influence from boo guests, as you mentioned, Chris, there's also an interesting character dynamic between the three main male characters which is based upon the character dynamic in Billy Bud, which was one of her big influences to the film, and it's fascinating character dynamic and she plays her it really well to deliver her own take on the on the concept in a in a new setting, and I think it works brilliantly. As a mattio mentioned alier about Shockla, it explores what it means to be a foreigner in an unfamiliar land, which is another one of her common themes, and it really builds upon her cinema of sensation. I mean there's striking shots of the African landscape, there's lots of close ups of these rising muscular bodies as the leadionaires a training and I actually thought that one of the training sequences, but a little like the ones that we see in in Kubrick's full metal jacket or be it, without the commanding officer shouting abuse at the trainees. And there's also the pulsating music as well during their hypnotic dance sequences, and it is a beautifully shot film. There's lots of vivid imagery and again it builds on the sense of an enigma, that the story kind of plays second fiddle to this sensation, this this feeling, this atmosphere that she creates, and I think this is one of the strongest films today to be honest, and really enjoyed watching this, probably my closest it came to being a favorite. Yeah, I completely agree on a beautiful will. It's my favorite, the clear news film, and I'm so God it brought up the beautiful visuals there, because if you appreciate risual to just so much, here it looks donning. The film is not just ritually it's ristal. It just blends ritual impressions with Dunning contrast, Dream like cholera elements. It's set pieces that seem almost out of this world and it's all of this this kind of are of visual dance that has puettic, pwettic elements to but but you just go into this the dance sequences, and you go into this just murmur of parking and and just acts with the body, which is pretty much for them, with central things. They are just the NIS shooting bodies in movements. It's it's something just so completely different from almost everything else out there, and it makes sense that it was, you know, spotted immediately embraced like it was, even if the homosexual elements there, if you will, might not have been as popular in the S as they might be now. And maybe you know the fact that it is so ambiguous. It's possible that some people just missed that as well, because nothing is ever seen. Like you said, there is just that billy, but mechanic are it could simply be that is not lost or longing, but simply jealousy. So it's dells in power. So it's there are those elements there. But onto what you guys mentioned with near Homoeothesis, and I mean this is interesting because obviously clearly need is woman that is shooting this, almost like she said, Derek Yarmm on say s about Sebastian. So it's it's a very different expression should then what we usually see when women shoot men in sexual situations, and it's it's very languid. It's very again visuals, as a lot of people simply their launching in beds or working in the heat, and it's it's all it's almost hard to describe. It's doing something here that, first of all, I don't think she did again, but that is very visceral, very visceral and just very communicative. That's what thinks we could easily say about any clearly will...

...even though she, liked you said, she is getting more or work in a later film. She is showing more than she's implying in her later films. But just this emotional intelligence, if it will, of just including so much subjects. They're letting US unpack it. That's something that's almost always present and it's one of the things that makes their film so exciting and interesting to unpack. You mentioned, Chris, the possibility of people in the she s like missing the poor sism again, as I said, for the first my watch it. It's not that I missed it. I knew it was a possibility. They thought it was not necessarily the only interpretation and, as you said, that the jealousy and the power dynamics were, you know, it sense enough to justify the happenings in the sense. I do think it's there that's seeing it without the context of her other things. It's it's anythink you can see too few different ways, but I'm just used. You mentioned that the way you NI shoots. I guess mail desire is different. Somehow snakes makers have done it. You have something specific in mind or Hmm, I think that that's a little bit more difficulty. I think it's more the comparison to how Derek Jarman should shoots men. So how some more specifically homeotic films like just one something as well, even if he feels far closer to say, Derek Garman and goes one someth here, then if he feels to other women filmmakers, but I can't really may maybe them is completely wrong and this the way both the game and and straight women shoots men are actually the same. I could just be making this connection up in my head, but it just feels lots more similar to just one something their Yarman. In my mind there is this languid that the just this very, very physical attraction where it's just specifically looking at, you know, their the language body in trying to see this secificate, weakness and sensuality there. That I think is more associated with gay directors than straight women directors. But I could, like I said, I could be wrong. I'm not a straight woman's I can't really say. One thing that we haven't touched upon in England detail yet is the brilliant it's of the acting across the board here, because this is a film that doesn't rely heavily on dialog. In fact it's incredibly minimal. Most to the emotion and the message of the film is conveyed through the visuals and a lot of the expressions, the the emotion that you see in Dennis lavance performance and also Greg War Collins performance really elevate the film to the next level, and particularly lavance character. I think it's it's brilliant, this reflection on his past memories and this kind of a fine line betw in it. You don't know if all these memories are correct or they could have been. They could have become hazy or distorted every time, and that's another thing that ties in with the concept of films looking at enigmatic individuals and it's something that I'm going to pick up on in one of her films that we discussed later. But yeah, the the acting in this was top natche. It really added a lot to the film. With a guest they acting. An interesting thing is that clany is very much on an island of her right within made comes from the French in my landscape, which is really doing her thing, and she feels very disconnected from from the rest, but except in one sense, which is that she always gets putting major actors. I mean, do you ever, is not exactly your conventional French star, but he is a pretty windown actor whose is is the mainstream from checktor and most of our things, even though she has kind of a troop ride collgions that I'm many other things, like you think got Conna, like Adin's discount. She kind of always gets some kind of a star somewhere, which is interesting because they always feel the day they good generally in her sense, but it's kind of like it's got something. She doesn't usually seem to be part of the big cinema industry, except in the sense that she has these relatively big styles innocent. It's a great point, Matt here, and it's interesting she seems to tempt these exceptional actors perhaps more opening and willing to take a point on her more and like her less conventional style of filmmaking and, as you said, it gives rise to some excellent partnerships. So I agree she to somehow tends to attract these these brilliant actors. Yeah, completely agree, and in some of these films they give some of the career best performance as a man. Unfortunately, we're not talking about white material today, but it's about a pair like her performance by...

...material is one for greatest performances. It's CO evocative and powerful. I mean I completely cored and SLAMM was fantastic in beautiful well as well, and she's able to bring something out of the actors to that's very special. So, even though we often think of her more that you know minimalist or a stylist or someone who plays a lot with the you know, hiding emotions, see it actually does actually have a lot to offer actors, and I think actors often shine very well in their films. It's it's interesting that people are drought in the frequency that they are, but I think it also it also shows this how respectively is within the film intry, especially the French film ministry. Yeah, I think it is a challenge for actors to an interesting change, to actually in Candessian went, because you get sluch on dinog. In a sense it's a great showcase for an actor and I think we'll see that the especially in the next thing we'll talk about, where you just have to convey a lot without, yeah, the Crutch of dialog that supposed yeah, see, you're completely right. I think it's interesting that, you know, we skipped them almost impiety of the nineties in our in this the lead from Choko a lot to beauty well, but never actually going to talk about three films back to back. So starting with Bot about in now we're going to talk about trouble every day from two thousand and one and Friday night from two thousand and two. And also, reasons why we are doing this is because here is some really, really rapid progression in her style. You have beat a well, which just still is this really visceral, visceral film filled with an AGMA and possibilities in interpretation and nothing is actually told or clarified, and then you suddenly jump into trouble every day, which is this cult classic now is a vampirefully before we go on to Friday night, where things start to get a little bit more explicit. So moving into trouble every day starring, you know, this story Bason't galow. This that my controversial of very controversial I'm not sure if you can even still call him a start with. It's a very well known name, let's put it like that, and it's also our first in English. Did this is really interesting. I mean, let's says again, put the stage here. It's two thousand and one. It's two years since the release of PUTRAVAIL. She has reached all of this art house a claim and instead of continuing that style and building on it, what happens in Studis that it takes a complete left turn jumps into shown feelmaking grand is still with a lot of minimalist but not with any of her usual allusions to, for instance, sexual active there's near and see, seventeen new the dear, there's sex scenes, there's blood, and the blood is everywhere. Extensive amount of blood. I would say excessive amounts of blood. I she once no would be happy seeing all of this blood. And it is a horror movie. It might not be, you know, the most traditional horror movie, but it's squarely within the Querky, slow, offbeat vampire film, filled with blood and again, knew the day. It doesn't care that much about established rules, and you know it does. The fact that it is so often cuffs and site different than the General Fadre, for it may repel a lot of traditional fans off the Sean Dra but I mean this has become a cult classic and for a long time this was sold just everywhere in in your back in the DVD age with obviously a fairly sexual and blood the DVD cover, and people did see it, people and it has built up this kind of presence. So what's your reaction going into trouble every day, because obviously there's some things that's the same, but so much is different. Like how did you react and how did you make sense of it? It feels like Denis made it. There's such a great impact of future hail and obviously she had great critical acclaim of that that she's just kind of thought this is a time for me to let loose and show audiences exactly what I'm about with trouble every day, and it kind of fit's a really nice sweet spot for me between the world of art horris and the world of Genre cinema that I think can potentially risk alienating certain audiences, particularly those who have come to a doorho progression in the world of Art House and watch he has become, but also,...

...at the same time, it may seem a little too abstract for your regular horror crowd. So I think it's a bold move and I absolutely love this one. To be fair, I mean the the story. Again, it hardly feels important because it's a film about Carnal Desire, strange sensations and dangerous lust, and it's all conveyed through a heady mix of transgressive bloods and violent as I said, it's kind of a sublime balance of pure horror and art her sensibilities, and I suppose, Chris, how I interpreted it was again linking back to this theme of lust that she builds upon and how it's fleeting and can be incredibly dangerous, and this this age can be tempered by acting on instinct, as we see in the film, but there seems to be a temporary measure that can only satisfy for so long, whereas perhaps the underlying message here is that she's saying that the true love can be sustained, and that is kind of an interesting aspect, because the couples that we meet in the film are obviously in different stages of relationship, as one couple on on a honeymoon and then one with the male party doing everything he can to to save his relationship, and it's an interesting balance and there's a lot to interpret and the film and really I'd love to see more of this kind of vision away from the knees. If she and this roots a game which aspe she did with high life, but if, if she builds upon this, then there's a chance that I'm going to become much bigger fun maybe appreciate as much as you do, Chris. Trouble every day definitely fuse in some ways like a turning point in her career. So I'm not sure that's really borne out by the things that come after, but certainly it's very different to what you had made before. The English language, the genre elements and, as you mentioned, Chris, how explicit it all is, just in terms of violence and in terms of sex. There are scenes that are that you will not find in previous get any film. And at the same time it's all the same as her older films. Right. It's all the same themes explored in a different way. The desire, the power dynamics, like vampire story, is actually the maybe the most obvious thing for her to do. So it's kind of a contradiction of the thing. In that sense it's a thing that I think speaks to me a little bit more than some of the hold other things, maybe because they are these moments of release, right, these kind of release I means, I guess, literally, but also in terms of cinematic language. Right. Maybe some of what holds me back with clearony is that there is a her films can feel bits monotone to me and I guess the same thing you could say for about time. I was with the last scene, but in trouble, every day you get multiple scenes that are kind of break in her time, and maybe that's why. Obviously they are commercial aspects that make it more successful than other calney things in terms of it's just more wall known, but I think it stands out because of that. It stands out because it has those scenes that kind of capture the feelings that she's always trying to evoke subtle with subtle tea, and suddenly having that sort of t gun can, I think, enhance the experience. Yeah, I'm so happy that there is at least one the clear the needs film. He is completely fell for and obviously we can see that we have slightly different the sensibilities. There because this is one of the clear the needs films. I like less. I still think it's a very good film, but that's just also a lot of things that does did not quite the work for me. I think win from Callo, if partially at the forefront of that. I mean there's a lot of mumbling actors. Mumbling actors can do a lot of great things in films like this, but the gun mumble so much that the you know, like you could get Casey afflet confused with Morgan Freeman, let's say. I mean it's really, really excessive how much he mumbles. And then you just have this fact that I guess I'm not a strong in by just the fact that it is all out on show the way it is here. It feels like a cheaper to me and I could not get entirely into the atmosphere. Still think is a really good film. I still think that when it worked, it has that punch there, but it just feel like something's missing. It's a little bit rough around the the edges. So that that that's my takeaway from the film. It's still good. I think it's really exciting what it made clearly need to do to her style. I think it's really amazing as she went there, but it's not quite my thing.

I think the fact that it roofs around the edges is one of its strong points, because it's kind of this dark, dirty and griny will that we see. You know, there's lots of horrific seems and I think that if it was too polished it might not feel as real. So I think that kind of works to it its strength. Yeah, but I'll actually completely agree with that. I shouldn't be brushing off the fact that it's a bit of frondedious agaly. It does add that dimension and it is what probably drives it's cold why as well. I mean I don't think of a bitter come as popular with the, at least a certain part of the horror community if it didn't have that roughness, because it makes it all feel not sure if it's intense is the right word, but it does. It adds a kind of extra endity there that probably wouldn't have been there otherwise. I should add that we haven't mentioned yet. He's done in the hold of the main vampire, I suppose, and I think she's particularly good here. She has a presence that means that she doesn't have to do that much in terms of acting. That comes with obvious acting, I guess, to capture the this kind of otherworldly feeling, and I think she's really a perfect choice for that one. And I wanted to mention her because I think she's, for me, the standouts of the sins in terms of performance, and she certainly one of the selling points. I mean, he's he's covered most of the posters and it is a very interesting performance. I mean, let's just say it's very evocative. And something else that's evocative but almost little out of place, is that this is the niece is second collaboration with the tinder sticks. I mean, are you guys hands of tinder sticks? By the way, I guess I have no strong feelings when we are another I like the music that you that is used in calonice films, but it's not. It's weird to be because people always mention the music and it's never really struck me that much. I think there's some scenes, so believe we day is the title Song. But yeah, I guess, I guess I was never that a never had a really strong reaction to it and they scored. Another thing, not by her recently and I did not really notice it. So I guess I feel neither warm knock called. It was them. I'm Matthew. I'm kind of ambivalent towards them as well. I think the music was perfectly suited to the film, but it was as it wasn't a soundtrack that grabbed me and made me want to go and listen to the music outside of the film. Yeah, fair enough, I mean it then it's worked at in the takes on several of a film starting with none at that Bonny, and I mean there. If they're a band, I quite likely, even potentially love especially the early stuff. But I mean it to be at least the music seemed a little bit daring, almost because they are shamber pop band. I mean they do film scores to the ambient, to do orchestral as at her as well, but they're so soft and soothing, and I mean probably every day is not quite southing, let's say so. I did appreciate the contrast the quite a lot. Well, just on ten the STIX. I guess maybe not knowing them at all outside of their their work in cinema, maybe it makes it was jaring and I think the song probably the day song is it has the melancholy that I think is pitch appropriate actually too to the same yeah, I think you're perfectly right as well. Is that melancholy. It that the need also places into the film. That makes it different and it just shows what she can do, the controuction she can take seen bra filmmaking into and the dinner stakes also scored her next film, Friday night ruin, which is again a very different direction for her. I mean it's essentially like she went into one extreme and she pulled it back into another, because Friday night is and even more minifulist film, if you could possibly say that, then several of her previous works. It set in very spares locations, like I mean I think one third of the film is literally inside of a car. But at the same time I think her experience with horror did something and change something here, because the soundscape and the visuals feels very different from, say, Chocola and be travail. You get extreme close ups, swallowed sound, heat, cold, like just building up boredom and fear at the same time, like it almost feels such a shooting, a horrible with just the way sounds worked away, the close up Brooks, just the way she feels. This woman sitting in her car feels uneasy, but for such a long time very little happens. I mean there's also a lot of tie over with trouble every day. I mean it's a bit crass and a polished. It certainly shows more than all of the films before trouble every day, but it's also so I...

...it. I mean so quiet that these calls up sometimes feels like screams or you know when you're right it with caps locks. Like the contrast between the quietness and the close ups and sounds. It makes it more obvious. It can cause sensations of dread and the way she captures shadows moving around the way it really feels like it's building up to something horrifict as to get that sense that something could go terribly wrong. It's really just feels to me like he's taken all of the things she is built on and learned throughout her career and try to kind of assemble them to get there, to create something new, at least to me that that was just really exciting to watch. Yeah, I think this one is actually my favorite. Not maybe a huge difference, but I do think it's possibly my favorite. I think what you mentioned about the tension. I guess in it the menace and maybe just the simple concepts. The basic onset of your second is huge traffic jam because of the strikes. Feature was a very real thing. Huge sex in ninety five. That's a very concrete, I guess, and very simplified way to start with him. Right, you have just this character in this croastophobic environments and she's clearly not feeling great about it. She's at an interesting point in her life. But this actually is very good as she really conveys the sense of how insecure she is in any situation, right, but especially once a man is in her car. And so you get the usual instense. It is to the usual doy touch of the desire, the way that the bodies interacted, the way you look at at the other's body. But you also get this fear and maybe I guess I didn't really link it with proper every day that. Maybe you're right, but maybe she's taking some of that and bring good it over here. But yeah, I find that that initial situation that is just it grips you in a way that I don't think I've been gripped by other treadern Ethan, and I think from there it's still calony, right, it's still this very understated again, not a lot of dialog and it's very simple film. That's really two things happening in the whole film and that's about it. But yeah, it's also a very tender film. But, Chris, to Tom you mentioned in Shokola, you the tenderness and though you're right, it is there, it did not strike me especially compared to this film and the next one. This tenderness is also what makes me like it. In it's more and the I know Chris Dreads that word, but the warmth, and I know Chris doesn't care about warmth, but I do. And there's yeah, that there's a lot of as at the same time as there is tension and threats. There is more warmth in this film than in any of her films prior to the ones I've seen, and maybe that's also why I connect with it a little more easily. It's interesting that at it's her Fannin I is a Roman film. What of our lot elements that you would see in a thriller. As Chris said, there's some menace and matter you said that it is quite tense in parts, and I also thought the music when they're in the car there. This film score was very similar to Hitchcock's psycho and it conveys this sense of thrilling film wrapped up in the guise of a romance. We also see the great use of double exposures and dissolves. It's like any is toyin around with with the medium once more, but it at its heart, as you said, it's a film again. It's about desire and longing and perhaps even living in the moment, and it made me question whether what we see for the most part of the film actually happened or whether it is just a mere fantasy of a woman sat in her car. I mean, I couldn't get past this aspect of why Jean would get in a car during a traffic champ that's not moving. You know, is he interested in the in the woman in the car? Is He actually going somewhere? It just seems a bit unusual to me and it seems more like a kind of fantasy element to don't know if you had any similar interpretations as me, or it's just another anematic, clad Denis film where we interpet things in different ways. I think it's in very intentionally plays with that idea of how the trouble would we see as weel where there's editing in particular movie, he plays on nuts by the end of it. I feel like the same would not made that much sense if it wasn't real. But it's a sinty something that is in the same yeah, I agree. Yeah, I don't think I ever suspected it to be a dream or be directly fantasy, but are those elements there? You are right, and it's easy to interpret it many different ways. I think the main way that interpretation place into to me is just the nature of the romance. If there's something genuinely romantic and sweet, or...

...is it something slightly ugly or this might be rare. No, materialize different a little bit. Again on this warm thing because like he might like to go because he's more warmth in it. Well, I might see a bit more ugly in this and that my drive up my interest appreciation for it. So I mean I think that it's worth noting that this woman does have a partner already which is meant to moving in the wit, and this potential relationship is an affair and there's a lot of danger elements with this man to like we don't know who he is. He's clearly quite rash. It's quite clearly an element of fair I mean, if I wanted to be pointed, if I wanted to say something really crust here, I mean I could theoretically say that this is the minimalist answer to the fifty shades of gray. So it's it is place on those tropes where the mysterious, dangerous, potentially even powerful, strangerer coming into someone's life and danger equaling sex. It's a very it's placed a little bit more on lust in my mind, than say, Romance, and there's a degree of cheapness to some of it and there is consistently this even if, visually like you don't have beautiful, stunning language shots that you know from many previous clear these films like here you get, you know, fairly ugly street to get cheap putels, you get near the name on lights. It's a very different visual atmosphere as well, but that also does create something really exciting. I think it's a little bit all over the place tonally, which is probably one of the things that stopped there from being a complete favorite for me. I do like it. I think it's a really great film, but it does jump between completely different moods, like you said, some of them more romantic, some of them more like twiller area, horror area. There's even a couple of scenes that you even play up comedies. It feels a little bit all over the place. It maybe a little bit neurotic, but I also think the actually manage has just put these completely different sensibilities together really well and create something almost unique and the very extraordinary experience in here. So it's a great film. It's has explosive visual appeal, let's say, and, like we all been talking about, there's a lot of different things to unpack and discuss and interpret. So I mean it is definitely one of the films anyone interested in clear needs should see as soon as possible. But this is interesting because I don't agree with much of what you said the Chris, I guess you mentioned it being all over the place. To me it feels like the most focused can doney film, at least the ones I've seen. Yeah, I mean don't see it that being all over the place at all, and I think you you keep mentioning them the threat. I think it's there. I understand that. It's more about her state of mind. Then, I think something the film is doing. I think. I think by the time we get past a certain point there's an event right where it seems like she maybe has been wrong, interesting this this person, and you know, I think things turn out okay and I think past that point, to me it's not really about the sweats and I don't sense that much danger. But that much danger. And as far as the cheapness goes, I guess I see what you mean with the motel, but with stuff like that, I think the way she shoots the traffic jam. There are some quine beautiful shots there. I think the way she uses the lights of the cows. Yeah, it's it does not feel to be the messy film or like a cheap film and it feels very focused. So I guess I kind of disagree with everything you said. I'm sorry. Yeah, I figured you were. You would say that that you and I think that's why I both of us like this movie as much as as we do, because we were able to interpret that then these different ways and see slightly different things that you get your warm that I get my my qualitness, if you will, and then we're both happy. That's a great difference of opinion there. I love it and again it just builds into that aspects of Denise filmography whereas you know, there's so much to interpret and unpack. And I just wanted to discuss a bit more about a fellow elms. She's character in this, because it feels like we get to know who very intimately, and this is because Dennis is now sharing all aspects if characters journey, and this adds to the film, makes it feel sensual and evocative, and this is built upon by some of the intense close ups and it makes the ending feel liberating, both for the main character and also for the audience, because it feels like we've been part of something private and special and they've kind of established a unique...

...connection with the main character, which is perhaps something that is missing in previous deny films, though I'm not sure it would have been necessary with those, but it is a nice kind of contrast and shows her developing style in that regard. Who, now that she's willing to show more, which you know, it's kind of building upon the visual aspect that she wish to sharing in trouble every day and I think it's interesting to look at this van. They say like it. Think it's really interesting to talk about being the complete journey, because the next film we're talking about, thirty five shots of rum, also feels a bit like a complete journey, but in a very different way. And I do apologize for skipping and in through and her documentary verse my Hed, but thirty five shots of rum is one of her most respective film, most acclaimed films, and it's again bit different. It does something else. It's feels even more calm, even more low brooding in a way, doesn't have the same like, make me wrong here this time, the same sense of lust. There's a couple of things we can discuss which it comes for, but you still have a sense of long I think what's interesting here is that, unlike most of other films, this is specifically about a father and daughter relationship with, you know, the romantic interests being less in the picture, even though it's they're quite strongly and I think it does actually build on father daughter dynamic more than anything else. Here, just trying to show kind of again, this is action sense of intimacy and longing. This kind of pieces that's not quite there, and these two characters, coinhabiting and trying to get different things from each other, are also living their life, if but again the sensibilities are very different. That feels a lot to taughter. The cinematography is beautiful, but it's also be as a little bit colder. We're once again in Paris. It's very interesting experience and it's a bit I guess it. Would be most interested in hearing what you guys felt going from the previous evolution of the need into this one. Like what was your main takeaways and what do you think about thirty five shields of from it feels like they're certain elements of her directing style that are being toned down here. She becoming perhaps and more restrained, more mature filmmaker, and it works really well with this kind of I wouldn't say slow, but it a kind of measured pace of storytelling. It feels like we almost land in the the middle of this story, in the information slowly being drip fed to us as we gradually learn about the characters, in particular the special bond between the father and the door to hear, which is an intense relationship that is heightened by their loss of their wife and mother, which is information that we don't learn about until quite a bit in the film, which is, you know, a strange way of doing things, but it, I suppose, thirty five shops a room deals with the never ending ever of change, people coming and going from the lives of others and the impact they have, and it's also toys with the comfort of routine in familiar raity. Without it, some people seem to be lost and missing, to shy away from this change. So it's, as you said, because it's while made film. It's very good film, though I did feel it lacks some of the emotional impact that affected me. More in trouble every day and I'm friving at so I quite like this film cons on Como, such five shots of rum, but it does feel like an outlier in Covenian ography. To me it's the one that isn't it's probably her least sensual film, the one that is not primarily about this ire, at least it does not feel that way to me. It's maybe an element in some of the scenes, but it's not essential. And Yeah, it feels more like a quiet drama, maybe a little more conventional, even though you still have approach is still visible. It's it's not that conventional, but but it does seem more conventional than many of her other things. And Yeah, the definitely a warm and tender film, I think. I think in this case we made agree because, yeah, it's a family like I don't really know. It also has a men on cy right, I guess I mentioned the men and city of the titled Song in Trouble Every Day. That's not a quality I really associate with dud in general. You could argue it's there and all of the things, maybe, but it's definitely the central feeling I get from this thing. It's kind of small, quiet lives with regrets, right, and with yeah, it's a regret even the younger characters and because the the daughter, she really has this kind of fear of leaving her home innocence, and so even for her it's kind of the end of something...

...that is happening in this film and I think that's kind of what is overwhelming in the thin in general, and that's not something I associate that much with God any so it's an interesting for me in that way. It's maybe lacks something extra to make it stand out by the same time that maybe we'd be a betrayal of what the thing is about. Right. It's just this very quiet drama. Yeah, I think when they call it melancholic, I mean that's probably the best way to describe this film. Is really all about the characters feeling out of place with where they are, not quite being happy where they are, but not quite there, in hope to go somewhere else, to try something else, and it's if you are to say there's something enigmatic here, is something, something that's missing, some kind of long or lust. It's almost this long or a lot to get a way, to break free in a way, and also not managing to do that, which is ties in with some of the things that happens later in the films. We feel suddenly feels a little bit freer. It ties a little bit in with, you know, the great are calling character of no, if about this, just eveness, just get the way. But if even that a proper option? So I think it's. It just has all of these for more enter but also quite important. That not quite existential, but they're just a carey of urgency here. That is probabling. Under the surface there is a degree of longing, but it's not long in the sense that we used to from the knee, which makes it, just like you said, a very different film. I'm also impressed by the fact that someone can bring thirty five shots of ROMP and survive. I mean there is, it is related to death right there is. I guess that is maybe the I don't know what you say, but, as I said earlier, that the same maybe like something extra. I guess that is the scene that is maybe the most exceptional events of the same, even though it's kind of mentioned before. I something that's happened before, something that's kind of a tradition. I guess that is the scene that is kind of the high points of the Sun, but yet it's such fashots of m I don't know. Yeah, I definitely would not be able to survive that. Yeah, I wouldn't be interested in trying either. There are some elements of a clearness, all style and all focus on luster, though I think whats the things that stood out the most to me is this dance scene. I think it's a continuous real time scene. It's not involved shot, but it's it feels like real time and shot or a single song is these people dance and if you can get the sense of lust longing right there you have two couples, both Dan saying you have intrigue, you have additional love interests, if we will, coming into the picture. And that's probably one of those scenes that almost encapsulate so much of what the neither done in the best it's bread taking to look at. But then right after that's done, is like this called cut and your back into the melancholy all the theme and as is the gone, just looking at these very somber, broken characters that have split away from each other. So this clearly this focus on connection here and not quite managing to connect it. I think it's beautiful, I think it is powerful, but I can see also why a lot of people would think the film is does a little bit too quiet. I just had that scene. Is a sen a o. The thing in definitely one that stiyes the anesty too, who've been talking about be the need all along. So it's a very powerful and focative scene, this moment of the two cup couples dancing together and as well as the elements that you mentioned, Chris, there's also a lot about the power dynamic there, which is something that is present and a lotted to these films. You've got this father watching his daughter who's bottomed into a young woman and there's that kind of shift of balance that she setting out in her own life now and you know he's no longer got control over that. And the fact that she here interaction with the the young man. It's shows a power dynamic there as while that she's in control the relationship, and there's a lot of interesting aspects that have brought up. On the dance scene, it's quite a pivotal scene within the film and the talking about emotion conveyed here. I think we talked about how the Knie can get really strong performances out of her actors before, and I think both Alex the scar and multi deal, who of course went on to become a powerful director in her own right, a really delivering on this melancholy in the somberness, and I think even the smaller rules are all contributing here. And I do think the fact that it is a more quiet filmed like my you, I said, it feels a little bit more conventional, even though it's still clearly at the knee film and it's still very stripped down. I think it gave a very special to the place where his actors to just really shine and bring these emotions, because they have to carry it, and at least as far as I'm concerned, I really think they did it. It's beautiful to just watch the dynamics are play out and all of the melancholy,...

...all of the somberness, all of this and certainty can really be felt and this sense of not sure if you can call it more straighter films, but white material too felt slightly more commistic, still a rupturous film with incredible central performance by its belt of air, but it's still something I think more mainstream audiences can and did enjoy. White material became a really big success and then, in essentially the tense to they get, it just passed. She stepped a little bit back again. She went with something like she did, less a lot, which kind of didn't really make a big way of its feels a little bit more ugly as well. And then she may it, let the sunshine in which, if anything, started her proper full out collaboration with Juliette Pinnock, who's still in high life as well and in her upcoming film. Who but that one? To me? I like that one as well. I don't you see you seen that matter if to me it felt a little bit like slightly Weaki version of clear from five to seven, just without the health plot. And then finally, in two thousand and eighteen she made her probably biggest film today, highlife, and it's just this film before in our space exploration episode. But having just seen frivor even more of the then films just over the last few weeks like, have your impressions on High Life Changed in any ways? Is there something else you see in that film now, and how do you think it compares and build some beneath style? So the only two other Codes Sans I've seen now to the you just mentioned, I'm busy entire late. The Sun Shine in and highlights and let us and Chine in. You. I did not think of clue from fifty seven watching it. I don't, but it is a sin that which respectively seems very weird. Okay, I don't need to make back. When I saw it I had only seen good, have I, and so it did not strike me that it was such a departure. But now, thinking back on it, it's I think it's quite dialog focused. It is very much about desire, but not as focused. Don't remember the same making being that focused on bodies as much. Again, what I remember of it is mostly really nice performance, which I think she's great in, the him and I remember the ending, the ending, which is is very strange. Get the end credits over, you hard about your monolog and he's being a weird character who's kind of psychic. It was kind of describing his views of life. It's memorable ending. But yeah, thinking back on that film I don't I don't really make sense of it within tearing his career, so maybe I need to watch it at some points. As far as highlife goes, I guess again, it's a Finis, so I did not have that stronger grasp on who klny was as a finmaker, but I did certainly catch onto the idea that the film is very intensely focused on bodily fluids. I guess it's, how I would put it, in a way that even her other films are not. And the focused on bodies, but not not as much in what comes out of it is definitely all about that. It's a film that leave left me a little cold, but I found interesting, as with many of her films. It's one I think. I think all of clebny's films. I feel like I appreciate them more as I see more of them. So at one point I will definitely look forward to be visiting high life, which I remember having some very strong elements. So how life was actually the first clartony film that I ever saw. I was drawn into it because of the SAPPHILEEN INS. It's, you know, the space aspiration angle, which is what we discussed in our previous episode where we focused on the space satuation. So I won't focus too much on that, but it's very interest in thinking back to it now having seen the rest of more mast of filmography, because in most of the films as an underlying sexual tension that never comes to the forefront, but here it does come to the forefront. It's very pervated and sexual and it's a very explicit film and I would love to revisit it now, more familiar with her work, because there may be Sur elements of it that I didn't pick on or appreciate it as much the first time around. Now I've got more grasp of his tendencies and his styles. Yeah, that's that's really good. Point. I mean I think it's clearly builds more into the legacy of the trouble every day then her more enigmatic and the film fish just doesn't really show anything or it's unders under exploit here. It's not fully in view. For me, I think what, once again, this is quite similar to trouble every day do, what really makes it interesting is that she takes obviously the space, dropes, etc. And she, you know, just brings in these minimalist the techniques, is very different sensibilities and it's just breaks it down. I mean highlife spends so many years, I mean spends decades even, and it's just the time is just been the matter such an extent...

...for this flash through it and that makes a very different type of experience. It's almost a little similar to beautraw in this sense that you experience the story rather than just watching the story in the traditional sense. It's more visceral and more driven through the emotions of the story and the connections of the scenes we're seeing, and that's something that they need us really, really well, and I like I love high life to beyonce. It's one of the films from knee I like the most. That I think it has a strong central performance and it is a little bit rough around the edges as well, as trouble every day is, but I just think it has that wrong poetical edge. I think it has like this beer bond minimalism in space. It does something different and it's just really great to watch her be able to do that. So I'm not sure what to even expect from her upcoming films. Now I do hope she does more of these shot films this, more big budget films, etc. And and are able to bring something new into them. I think Foodo looks like it's going to be a step back towards the normalcy for her. So I'm really excited to see what is going to do later in her career as well, when she's already in her s s though. So I mean it's really interesting to see how vibrant or film still are, as well how daring she still is. So it's going to be really exciting to see what her next films are going to be and also how long she'd actually continue. But I think generally one of the things I would say that Catany is that she's not scared of doing very different things, even though they are these clear trends in her films and these teams that keep your going seem like a complexified shots of ROM trouble everyday and would have I so different. It's quite remarkable how she's able to take her what makes her her as a director and take it through things that are going in so different directions, and I think that's one of the things that is most remarkable about her. And, like you and curious about what comes next, I would have to act a bay for your statements there. There's a consistency amongst the themes that she explores, but then there's such a great variety in the approaches she takes to to bringing these themes to life with, you know, interesting in different stories. So I'm also excited to see what the future holds and hopefully, as Chris said, we get to see more seen Elton's, because that would certainly be something be excited about. Oh and hyping up her very last film coming up now with this year. Who that's going to have a pretty forecast off the the irregulars as well. So do you let but not gets back at wins and Lindam, if back greatically, and if they're not the deal, if even playing in it and art house favorite bulloor gear is actually in it as well. There's going to be really interesting to see what this film will bring. Is a love triangle story and again I'm not sure when this episode will be released. Perhaps we will have a trailer for for out already. Perhaps you will be out already because we're quite late in two thousand and twenty one when we're recording this, though, it's definitely something to look forward to and, like everyone seems to be whatever the need does, at least it's interesting to me personal it's usually great and I'm very happy we were able to discuss five of her films in this detail and the help each other appreciate them slightly more, share different ideas, different insights, and then just get more out of these films. And now I would also like to thank our listener, old Ale, because this is actually kiss traditions. He participated in our questionnaire and one they great privilege of being able to pick an episode from talking images. So thank you all that. This has been a really fun episode to do and when we probably wouldn't have done at least not as soon, if it hadn't been for you. I certainly had a blast doing it. I hope you had a blast listening to it. So thank you so much for listening in and the joints again soon. You have been listening to talking images, the official PODCAST OF ICM FOR USCOM.

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