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Talking Images
Talking Images

Episode 39 · 8 months ago

Best Films of 2020: Our Top 10s (with a cliffhanger)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Yes, it's that time! Finally! The Talking Images team is ready to open up and talk through our top 10 favourite films of 2020 - granted, with a cliffhanger.

You are listening to talking images, the official podcast of ICM Forumcom. Well, hello everyone, I'm Chris, and let's be just put it like this. It's countdown time. The year. Twenty twenties done and as always, it's time to go through our very favorite films of the year. That was and wow, we have gone through so much prep for this episode. I don't think we've ever prepared so long or so hard pressed singular episode in talking images history. Over the last six or seven months you have actively exchanged recommendations and slowly formed our lists to the point that we feel that, yes, we're ready for this. So if you ever listen to any of our previous best of the year episodes, you know the structure already, but just in case you don't, it's pretty simple. We will first list the films that, unfortunately, we cannot dig that into in this episode. That is, our number ten to six favorite films of there and then we'll get into the actual discussion. Taking turns each of us represent our fifth choice, with comments and discussion from the others, and once done, we move on to our four choice, third, second and finally, our number one pick of two thousand and twenty in the cases where a film is on multiple lists, it will skip it for this pult and allow the person who loved the most to present it. This is because, as our love of the film's grow, each film will be given more and more time. But let me just say this is very few overlaps. There, though. Let's just jump trait into it and run through the films that unfortunately could not make the proper discussion portion of the episode. Well, unless some good Samaritan actually picked it for their top five. Starting with you, mature, what are your ten to six fairy film of the air? Hi, Chris, hi, everyone, actually have a good Samaratan in soul, because two of my six pretense are on souls of five and imagining eight, so we'll get two those later, but the other ones I want to if. You mentioned French comedy and by the name of something monoir nine. Number nine simply black in English and, as name might imply, it's a comedy about race relations in films right now, which is a subject you don't see as much in French comedies as you do in American ones, for example. So it's a really fresh perspective on a subject that can be sometimes difficult to nail rights and Jean Pasquezad either, the star and director, is really breaking through that film in a way that I got. My number seven is a documentary called get not again, the French documentary. It's about an opera that was made in France recent theater, eighteen century opera, but made with streets dancers, and so it's this melding of two words in the art world, right of the street with the very tw additional form of JOPPA, and it's a fascinating documentary, essentially a making off documentary, but very well done. And then my number six would be the invisible man, the one em film with the Elizabeth Moss just a great whole and perfectly executing with an excellent performance at centered by Elizabeth Moss and actress absolutely love and some really standout scenes, just and excellently executed whole of in. So what are your pan to say spirit film? Chris, Hi everyone, first roll I just want to talk a bit about my exploration through two thousand and twenty films. I managed to see one hundred and forty four films in total, as I was desperate to try and find five favorites. Unfortunately, I can only find for favorites, but there are a lot of films I really loved amongst them. So my top ten count now starts with number ten, Gretel and handsult and absolutely beautiful horror film that reinvents the classic fairy tale with striking soundtrack and e really creepy visuals that make for an incredibly atmospheric experience. Number nine is a comedy, Shiver Baby, and Astute comedy about a Jewish college student who bumps into both her sugar daddy and ex girlfriend whilst with her parents at a funeral. Number Eight is a film that is in soul's top five, so we'll get to that later. Number seven is anything for Jackson, a sinister Canadian horror film about a bereaved saatanist couple who can nap...

...a pregnant lady to carry out their evil designs. And number six, which just missed out on the cut, is a film called Butcher's this is a horror that borrows heavily from the Texas chainsaw massacre and wrong turn to deliver an unforgettably sadistic ride for for unsuspecting teens who encounter a depraved family when their car breaks down in the middle of nowhere. So what there feels that you would perhaps even the sleep over if you could not present them right now. Hi, Chris, Hi everyone. Tomson probably harder to follow. You've seen a hundred and forty four films from two thousand and twenty. As of this moment, I've seen seventy ones. I've seen less than half of that you have, even though I feel like I've gone through tons of films from two thousand and twenty myself. Even though I haven't seen as many as somewhere or the CO host, I have found quite a few that I liked to lot. Narrowing down a six to ten was really hard as it is, let alone the five through number one. But the five films I wanted to talk about his runners up. One of them is a film that I only saw recently on Netflix. It's called spree. It's a black comedy about an aspiring social media star who begins committing murders while working as a rideshare driver. The film mostly consists of a series of the vice screams, like unfriended or searching, and I love those sorts of films, and there's lots of dark laughs. As he is very few followers keep commenting on how fake everything looks and how it's a scam come within in oblivion when he's actually going through and killing his people for real. So very interesting film. Another film, so I guess my number nine that I'd like to mention is the hunt. It Stars Betty Gilpinner. It's basically an updating of the most dangerous game. But it's not just that as much about hunting humans, it's also movie that constantly challenges our expectations. So it starts over the whole of different protagon this only for each of those characters to get killed. Move on to I like are character gets killed and we went to another CARROC gets killed, until we finally arrive at Betty Gilpin and there's a whole lot of other surprises in store, but I don't want to spoil it too much, but that's an awesome horror film. My Number Eight, I've also got a horror film. It's a film called Lucky. There's a ton of films called Lucky that this is the film called Lucky that's apparently are showing on shutter streaming surface. It's about a woman who wakes up as Carment Tom by a husband one night, the stranger breaking into the house does so every night. Things only get stranger as she then continues to fend off the attacker, only for him to vanish whenever she looks away from him. So crunched the wondering if she stuck in a Timelib. It's something more supernatural going on and will goes in a very interesting direction. For my number seven, for this podcast, I've got a film called air conditioner. It's moving from Angolder and it's very meditative. It's set during a spate of air conditioning units that are mysteriously falling out of tour buildings. There's some really great shots of the main character just wandering the streets virus the camera were creeping up from behind him, lots of neon lighting, lots of nifty low camera angles and just very mysterious what exactly is going on? And my number six, my runner up actually, is going to be mentioned later on by mature, so I am going to not mention it at the moment. Thanks so much so. My number ten of the year is the paulish merry go round by Darry I worheck, which is a visually stunning mid the way point between essentially occur, because mucky and Paul Vicelli in the eighth is both with the proper cult edge. My number nine is father by Serbomb Coldwich, which almost feels like a Serbian take on Ken Loach, with a crushing look at family separation and power inequality between the state and parents, or, in this case, a father who simply won't give up on my number eight I actually share a film with soul air conditioner by Frederick a Quirky Art House film from a Goala which, just like Sault says, has this stunning neonlook where air condition their units just keeps falling from buildings all around a class based society. Following it is two people from the lower working class or servant classes trying to figure out how to replace their bosses air conditioner, with a lot of humor along the way. My number seven is Wendy by been cycling, who is bringing the same kind of Mistral strength and beauty as he created for beast of...

...the southern wild immersing us in a really different take on the Peter Pan Story, based in the almost scary and unnerving play of children. And finally, all my numbers sixth position. I have some children by my ead my e. The we skinnily feels like a near realist Pairy Tale, blending the innocence of childhood and hearts reality. It's not just battle of good or evil, it's not just an exploration of childish fantasy and wonder, but this, this is crushing sense of the real world around them and the idea that their dreams really just is a fairytale. It's just that beautiful harsh film. I strongly recommend to everyone. And with that we are into the real episode, the real meat of things. Will start discussing the films amongst ourselves. So turning to you again, Mathia, what is your fifth favorite film of Two Thousand and twenty? All right, so by number five is war workers, the Irish animated film by Captain Sulon, the studio who did some of the sea and the secret of cans, the student with the very distinctive style. But I think war focus is the best yet. It takes place during the colonization of Ireland by the English and the COMONEY, with the main villain, even though he's never named, and it's about two girls. One of them is English and from the city, but you know the adventurous type and the other is Irish and a war worker, which is basically the Irish version of wherewelms. And it's all based on the real history of the English basically exterminating the wolves of islands at the time, basically to and the o themselves the population, because wolves are knnibal problem, and it builds a good coming of age story of adventure, while using both the historical comtexts of English coritonization and the folklore surrounding the Irish forests to great effect. That's what makes this film special for me is the animation. It really feels like a step up for cartown saloon. They're melting their unique style, which is especially great for these rich details backgrounds, with some anime touches in the action scenes. That's really help bring a lot of dynamism and vitality to do film. You get this contrast between the really blocky and angular city people and the flowering and round characters from the first and it's all a perfect combination with those elaborate backgrounds. You add to that great use of color, especially when fire is involved. Good music, which again breaks a bit with the House time by having your full song, and it's with lyrics and all that works surprisingly well as an emotional high point. That's again something that reminded me a bit of Anime, where you often have this kind of pop song in the middle, and yeah, it was really well here, even though I'm usually not a fan of that. You get this really, really accomplished animated film and that sells very engaging and it's a little conventional, still very emotionally fulfilling story of these two girls having to work through the differences and obviously learn something along the way, but not in a not preachy, just a very good coming of Agnaliti. See, yeah, we'll fuck US another fact. So will fulkers. I agree. It's a very great looking film. I think the point that you've made mature about the animation. The contrast between the characters is a really good point and the backgrounds are gorgeous and there's really great effects in there as the characters are cut and as they bleed. It's just a really striking looking film. As a narrative, though, described it as a little conventional and I'll probably say that's maybe an understatement. The story really didn't grab me at all. It all seemed very, you know, old heart stuff that I've seen before. The folklore mythology didn't interest me at all. I'm not really into mythology much in the first place and it didn't grab me at all. I've got, you know, young girl and a father or listen, and she eventually wins him over and it sort of like yeah, being there done that sort of thing. So as a narrative of the film didn't really engage with me, although I do think it did a quite a spunky young protagonist. Didn't really engage me as a story. But I agree that it is a beautiful looking film. Yeah, I'm pretty much in the same boat us all. I think that it's a stunning bill and I think that the animation style that Tom Moore has developed stands out for a reason. But in terms of just plotting and this film is a fairly basic verity. They could just as easily have been brought to life by this New York Pixar. It does felt like a little bit too slider. Mean there's a great children's film. Certainly I think...

...children will do it is for years to govern. Is a very good film for adults as well, but it does didn't quite strike me as a great film for adults. If I can put it like that. I would have to agree with both soul and Chris. They fit the nail on the head with this run. It's a beautiful film. There's no doubt about striking visuals, animated really well. There's also some really good voice act to from underneath seeing the lead of the young girl, and it's always great to hear Sean beans mollie voice as well. But it was the the conventional storytelling that that Mattie I mentioned himself didn't really grab me as such. It's a traditional story and it's well told, though it lacks the excitement to to really draw you in. That's what I felt anyway. So a good film but just shy of being a great one from my perspective. So just respond to that. I definitely see what you guys are saying. Yes, I agree it's quite conventional, but I do think there's you mentioned, so the father who won't listen right. I do think like that character of for example. He works quite well. I think he's not just putting there as an obstacle to the PLOX, right, because that's often the problem, which was kind of stories, and I think maybe it's the voice acting. I think the writing is just smart enough to make all of those familior tropes work well on me and obviously supports the the the amazing animation. I think the fin is quite smart about its historical context, the way it depicts this opposition between commonweal which we cannot name. It is just in the lot protective it. You know your history. Know as him and he's almost fanatic Catholicism, of Christianity Rather, and the way it's opposed to the paganism which is obviously really linked to that, all of that folklore. I think that's actually a relatively smarty done. Even though he's obviously a villain, there's kind of this recognition that's the world, that is that this magical world. It is dying, it is disappearing and that's not something you can really stop. I think the him has a sadness. It is that's is not that come for animated films, so I think that that it does have strength narratively for me as welling on to Tom well, this your fifth favorite film of Two Thousand and twenty. So my fifth favorite film of Two Thousand and twenty is Minari. Now, Minari is a charming and understated drama that uses simple yet exquisite storytelling to paint a favorite picture of life for a Humboldt Korean family who moved to Arkansas to start a farm during the S. chasing the American dream is at the heart of this time of story and, as you would expect, there are few hurdles on the way that tests the STOIC family, not least the talent and cultural gap between the traditional values of the family's grandma and the playful nature of her too adorable grandchildren. Directed Lee as it hung frames the drama with elegant compositions that capture the magic of a livelihood revolving around farming, and the beautiful scenes of nature are often spell binding. The story told is nothing new, though it's delivered in such an accomplished manner that it is easy to overlook this aspect as you've becoming lost in a brilliantly refined picture that tangles with your emotions and talks at your heart strings. So I really did like Anari, not as much as Tom but I do think it's a very solid film. It's proved trays, you know, five characters who come across as a genuine down to Earth family and some of the difficulties that they experience along the way. The strongest aspect of the film for me is a relationship between the sun and the grandmother, or at least that's what stayed in my mind the most in the months since watching it. And the actress who on the Oscar applying the role. She's fantastic it, which is very fisty. Her interactions with the grandson I just like, excellent, and the way, you know, she accidentally embarrasses him and public you know, Dingdong doesn't work, or whenever the line was, was great. It's also really nice the way that he comes to accept the grandmother after having so much friction towards or not wanting her to either in the first place, although for me that Paim very suddenly. I would have liked it to be a more gradual theme or building towards, you know, him going from wanting to try and choker on some sort of drink or whatever or two I'm actually coming to love as a grandmother. I'd what I really wanted something a bit more gradual with that, whereas it seemed very sudden. But still the interaction between those characters are really at heart of the film for me, although I know a lot of it's also about Steven Juan's performance and also about, you know, him trying to like growing like farmers our own crops. But yeah, the definitely a very solid film. Yeah, once again, I'm in a very similar place as all which is that I think...

...it's a very well made film. Just once again, it's very well active film. It's a strong drama, but that just didn't think it really quite reached greatness. So it says it has all the elements of being a very good film. It does doesn't pack that final strong parent at least for me. You know, it is a film that's I don't sure why that. I expected it to be a feel good thing and it has some aspects of that, especially early on, and I think the maybe I got that impression because of what sort talked about with vimidation of the grandson, with the grandmother, which has a lot of comedy. But it's actually a bit more complex than that and I ended up being much more interested in the parents. Really then then that relationship with which most people have bloomed onto. I think Steven Yuan in particular use a great performance in the end. I guess I agree with all of you that it's a good film, not necessarily one, I think, quite which is madness, but definitely when made, when which in firm and especially were acted by Stevenian absolutely and by you and you young, if we place the grandmother as well. I think that these two performances are clearly standouts in this film and it does have a lot of great emotion there. I think it's just it strikes me just as a little bit slightly. It does tie into some societal critique and some part of the immigrant experience, but it doesn't tie that closer to it. Like there's some really subtle, for instance critiques of Reagonomics, but you have to have literally been in America in the eight is to feel those minors things there. It could have been so much more. Perhaps the most interesting thing about Minori is that I think about almost half of it is in Korean, which is quite intriguing for an American based film and quite bold choice and not something that certainly elevates it in the discourse. But just as a general narrative it is just, like I said, I very, very good film. Yeah, I guess it's kind of a trend because we got last year, I think we got the fair well, basically an American film but with half of it in Mandarin, and it's caused one of those controversies. But both films did with being classified as for when films for some war terminies, because they just look at language. Anyway. Yeah, I maybe that it is an interesting aspect of the thing right, a good way to look at any guns population in the country like the US, really alone us, to see them domestically and to see how language is a huge part of what's mimmigrants or son or daughter of immigrants. Definitely it's encouraging to see films that it share multiple languages for, you know, large parts of the runtime, and I agree with Christ that. You know, I could be seen as slight with regards to the social commentary it offers, but I suppose it's it's a simple tale about a family who, you know, they're hoping for a simple life and I didn't feel that it necessarily needs that complexity. It allows the drama to be center stage and, as most of my cost of mentioned, the interplay between the five main characters is Brillianton and that's what really grabbed me and you know, I found it a great really heartwarming film. That's all well, this your fifth pavorite people of Dere anybody who knows me knows that I love time loop films, from Groundhog Day to Happy Death Day to the recent boss level. So I pretty much knew that I was going to love my number five or two thousand and twenty before even sitting down to watch. But even so, I can say that Palm Springs really impressed me. So Palm Springs involves a wedding guest who is stuck a the time loop and he's been stuck in it for ages and his life is suddenly shaken up when he inadvertently brings a young woman into his time loop. While there are many time loop films out there, this one tries something different by having its protagonist start off in the middle of the loop. That said, you know, since then I actually have seen boss leveling starts off in under the loop also, but generally the characters don't start off in the middle of the time loop. The other thing which is very different about palm springs is having model persons in the same loop. It is something that's been done before. There's a Canadian film called repeaters and there's also a film called a day from South Korea, which I would highly recommend. But whereas a day is structured as a beat the clock thriller, with the two people trying to work and gathering information to stop an accident and repeaters, as all about the time loop victims representing different spectrums of morality, in Palm Springs it's actually about the characters having fun and having a good time while growing, changing and learning a little bit more of each other, while the world around them remains the same. Just like soult, I'm a absolute soccer for films...

...that involve time loops, so I was very excited to see palm springs, having heard a lot about it, and it didn't disappoint at all. It was my number eight pick if the yeah, so it narrowly missed being in my top five, and I really enjoyed that it started out in the middle of the the time loopers soul mentioned. It's quite a novel idea. I know boss levels done it and there's obvious but at the Timosaur palm strings. It was quite new to me that and it really struck a chord with me. I really like the mystical elements around in the time loop concept. I think they work really well the fantasy side of it. There's some nice little touches that had a bit of depth to the film there, and it basically just hits all the right note as a breezy, entertaining comedy. It's so fun, it's easy to watch and the nature of time loop films means that there's things that you won't pick up on the first time but you will appreciate as you watch it again and again. So, just like Groundhog Day, I can see myself coming back to this one time and time again and I know that I'm always going to have a fun time with it. Also a thing I like to note. It was my number ten and one of the things I mentioned the higher on some of this. Yes, I'mimes well versed as you guys are in the time loop them. So my composion is the obvious one, Unhun Day, and I think you see what's adding. Other characters have more agents. Really does the thing. It just works so much better as a romantic comedy because of that, and I think the true heads are very gorismatic. I love obviously in Decemberg is very funny. I love because in the Yutty, who you from her mature of all things. She didn't get a great warning, that's but she was always great and it's love to see her get a thing where she as she gets to be super charming and super funny and, yes, just all all of great time and now a few themes on your list thor that have this pop stared and when it's done, when that the kind of started, it's just such a play to me and I think palm springs is a great example of that. Okay, thanks, guys. It's really great to hear the feedback for me about Palm Springs, because I know my taste in film doesn't always have it over up with everybody else, and it's really great to see the guys were board with this. I am very well versed in time films. I remember telling to Tom About it and I'd mentioned some like the Egyptian a thousand gratulations and films that he had even heard of. So I've seen a lot of them, double digits worthy least, and the palm springs deathitely between starting in the middle of the time loop in the modern war, characters just upstany so much and different things that have been done before and, like you guys have mentioned actually just makes a really great romantic comedy. I'm not really wrong, Calm Guy, but this one really worked and I agree thoroughly about the performances. Both the leads did an excellent job in the film. I think it's also worth mention at this stage because myself and soul so, we're excited by the prospective of time that films that we are looking to do a podcast episode I in the future. So that's one in Akout, and by that time I might even have seen pun springs. So my number five of two thousand and twenty could also be described, as I know I can't describe as a time to never minded nothing to do with that. But it's the metamorphsis of birds by Cutterina Lasconselos, which weaves memories, stories, letters and images into a visually poetic family Sawgu so colorful and the lie that it's impossible to not become entirely mesmerized. It's just incredible how it creates such a powerful dream like in hypnotizing fabric that carves out and almost and visited area in cinema, a through borderland between documentary filmmaking and this personal expression. It's not so much that it tests the limit of documentation and fiction recreation, as just rarely attempts the ladder at all. Stories are told or read from diaries, leathers or real people, even the director herself. And yet what we are shown is first and foremost representations of what we are called, as it creates a vent of remembrances, echoes, secrets, longings and connections, including a self assessment. It leaves us with more than the feeling of any kind of additional say film. It's just a unique, visually incredible slice of cinema that unlike almost anything else that I feel. I really liked the metamorphosis of birds. It's a, as you said, of a poetic film, visually quite striking, I would say.

I enjoyed the first part of it, which is very has more focus for me on this story of her, of the filmmaker's family. We enjoyed the way Katarina as concettos using the sea, because this film is in some ways all about the time that you mentioned jokingly, that it's kind of has a tie in with form springs early on, but yet it does. Yeah, it is about the passage of time, but mortality in some ways, and the sea is just such a powerful symbol of that was the powerful of something that is eternal and always moving at the same time, and I think she uses that very smartly and craft some beautiful images out of that. I do think the film loses with its as it gets more into the maybe the Meta nature of it's the cross between documentary and fiction that you love so much, Chris Lady. That didn't work quite as good for me, which is although it's yeah, poem and film and and the one that loot the metamorphsis birds didn't really work for me, sadly. The combination of documentary and Art House left me cold. There's some nice images but rather than enjoy me in the narrative felt alienating. I couldn't connect with the story at all, despite my best efforts. It felt too personal and yet from our quite distant at the same time. And I didn't want to deter people from watching it because obviously Chris and Mattia are a great funds are it, but if you're not specifically into art house cinema, I think this might be quite a challenging for you and experience. Yeah, I would agree totally with Tom About it being a challenging film. I was interesting that when Chris said earlier will be impossible not to be mesmerized by it, and I'd say, you know, early on I'll agree with that. It was definitely very captivating when I sat down to watch and he had all these extreme close ups and the film was refusing a cut away to medium shots. Definitely very striking the way I was put together. But you know, as the film went on, I guess I just got, you know, very tired of it. Like Tom said, it's a bit alienating. I couldn't really find myself grasping into it and just the mixture of, you know, fiction and documentary and where's it starting? Where does it end? I sort of like from myself getting lost along the way. The images were great, especially the ones of the ocean. You've got also some fast forward and shots of flowers blooming, which always looks lovely whenever it's captured on film. But yeah, I agree a lot with what mature said, that it starts off really well. The first part of it's pretty good, but then it's sort of, for me at least, loses it's why as it goes along and bothering anybody else, just like not this film unfortunately wasn't for me. That's actually really good. I think we have adequately in for their listeners of who will actually like this. So if you like strong visuals and you know unique to put the Gut since you'll at least enjoy the first the first half or first portion of the film, and then if you're not that into artiles, not that into poetry or films that kind of just play around with the cinematic language, you may drop out as goes along. Let's pretty good set up and just as slight spoiler for later, I think my number for film will be even worse or people who are not necessarily into artel film. So I can just drop that little nugget of information right there before we move on to our number four picks of two thousand and twenty, starting once again with Matteo. Yeah, so my number four is David fincher's man Sam. That's, I think, has suffered from being judged upon the altar of kin and, more genuinely, of being seen as the same about who will gain. That, obviously is a huge part of the props, but the question of authorship between Hammond, mankevits and awesome words is really known to film's main concern. I think it's more about make of its as this man who has a realization that he has spent his whole life distancing himself from the world by being this cynical and funny observer, sitting on the sidelines in places like William Hersh's mansion, and I'm using himself of the pretensions of big stars and basically making a living off that. The flashback structure of the film is not just there to Mimic citizen came the obviously that surplus. It's not to frame it as the work of someone who is reflecting on the merits of taking action, of trying to directly influence the world around you. People like Kane and William Hurst and awesome wells for that matter. I have a kind of people who make history right, that is, big personalities that are unavoidable. They they shaved the room around them, and people like Herman make bits are often the ones who write. It's from the corner and that position can be very comfortable. But I think part of the question that make...

...asks is is it productive, is it helpful, and how does it feel to be in that hole? That's why so much of the film is spent on the One thousand nine hundred and thirty four California election for governor, a moment where mankerits had to face the compromise of his position in Hollywood and industry that represents everything he despises and loves to mock, but it's also truly the place he belonged in, and so have this apposition between the political by tendencies of Hollywood and his own, and that is all related to the thing that's it's in game is. But it's AOKSO building this completely independent character study that's also just delily written. Dive in you heart is Hollywood and features a particularly great performance by I'm on the cipher it as my own Davies, because I haven't talked about that. But the relationship between make and Davis is another complex aspects of this all and their sins together both very entertaining. Just the dialog is very sharply written and finish are directed point well, but it's also deeply re reading about both their understanding of what their place in the world is and specifically in this context of Hollywood. Fincher is having fun with the sheer audacity of making a him that is literally in awesome ways, the shadow, but putting in cigarette burns and all that stuff and an, I'm using, immersion in the golden age of Hollywood, but mainly for me his offering us a thought for drama on this character of a writer who's perpetually on the sidelines of the socalled great men. And that's what I love about this, in the emotional complexity of those characters. I think for me almost everything in this film worked extremely well, except that in you bring out now there it is this emotional connection to the characters in this stronger, greater whole, the strong focus on her, a man monkey, which and I think it's a beautiful looking film. There's many this fantastic shots in it and it's clear just how much they would fins are enjoyed shooting in black and white, and I also take it is a film that's incredibly good if you're a character actor. I mean you mentioned, I'm on the side of it, for it's kind of like a not quite a collie that has a really large meteor roll in it, but there's so many fun side characters are like an after have they paid any attention to before? Arles Howard, who plays Louis B mayor mayor and is just fantastic in it. Is just, you know, steals the spotlight and there's so much essentially action when he speaks, so much focused not to mention Charles Stance as William randol first himself, who is also this incredible to working as so many great lines. So I think the drunken exchanges are just bought arm. I think where it loses itself a little bit is does this balance and also trying to be a great drama, because it's balancing so many stories and focuses at the same time that it never quite comes together as this big hole. But it's the really good film. It's totally entertaining, there's lots of great performances in it and Gary Oldman is definitely great. So it's just a really strong film that I can absolutely recommend. Yeah, unfortunately I need to be at the cent in voice on Mank. With that said, though, what mature mentioned earlier on about the film getting some detraction because of comparisons to citizen kind will with the being how I approach films and rating up a little about them as possible. It was my assumption that the movie was going to be about principally the writing of the citizen Kane and therefore I actually made it a point to re watch citizen Kain immediately before sitting down and watching Mank, which, in retrospect, is probably the worst thing I could have possibly have done it. So I spent the whole of mank sitting down and trying to draw comparisons between hat citizen kin and the movie Mank, which I've probably shouldn't have done. So I was trying to look for like similarities between the stories of it and being about larger than life characters looking for love. And the similarly similarities aren't really there, and that's probably because the movie mank isn't really about the writing of citizen Kins. It's the subplot. But then the film was market is about being about the writing of citizen Kane. So it's all a bit of a tricky one. But you know my experience of the film. I did find it quite, you know, frustrating, because I was looking for it to be about says in kin and it wasn't, and I guess the whole Hollywood backstory and the INS and outs wasn't too interesting for me. I guess other than you know memorable part with somebody course for Mank in the bathroom whatever, looking for Joseph El, mankuits, not our Horme, and Mankuitz, the director of all about evenstead. But you know, other than a couple things like that, it didn't really do much for me. The visuals, I mean, black and white always looks great, but...

I was really hoping for more visuals that actually referenced citizen Kane. So I guess I just overwork on the film. AD though disappointment and makes probably actually my least favorite David fincher film. That's it. I did enter it with the wrong mindset. I'm coming in somewhere close to soul on my reaction to mank have to put a disclaimer at their first that I'm not a fan of citizen Kane. I've only seen it the once, when I was a younger, relatively inexperienced viewer and perhaps not in the right frame of mind to appreciate the groundbreaking techniques, with more focused on the story at that stage, in my view in and it didn't grab me at all. Got To say that mank treads similar ground in that respect. I wasn't particularly a fan of the story but I could appreciate the approach and the techniques used by fincher to make this very beautiful film. I mean s Hollywood looks absolutely stunning. The lavish costumes and set designs acts as a striking backdrop, and some of the acting is just a blime. Gary Oldman is always excellent, and deservedly he was nominated for the Oscar, but I have to say that the right person won the ask in this case, which will get to later on in the episode. So I can certainly appreciate that. Mink is a wellmade, while executed film, though I wouldn't say I particularly enjoyed it as such. Yeah, so this is why I really emphasized the character and poltical aspect of it, because I do that most people did not be the care for that't get whites to which zone which, yes, I do agree with what Kiss said about big quality of it is. Also how fun it is, right how it's this dive into this world of thirty is Hollywood, which we, at least people, can care about fame, have at least some vilarity. Me and definitely agree with the stronger cast is across the golden especially CHARD's dances. I didn't mention him, but he is having a lot of fun being wigham Hurst and stayed out of her well Tom what is your fourth favorite film of Two Thousand and twenty? My fourth favorite film of Two Thousand and twenty is one that also appears in soul's top five, so will skip it for nap and get into that a bit later in the episode. Exciting and moving on to Saul. What this? You're number four of the year. The film that I've selected as my number four of two thousand and twenty is one that I knew almost nothing about before sitting down to watch it. The IMDB banner ads cleverly worked, though, because those Amazon prime original and after receiving a golden glove domination for best comedy actress that of silent to find the give it a guy, and after watching it, I actually altered my glow predictions on Gold Derby and I successfully managed to predict Rosamond Pike Wing in the Golden Globe. He deservedly too, because I think it's a career best performance for her and I don't generally like her as an actress. The film that I'm talking about years of course I care a lot. That's the name of the film. I mean, I do care a lot, but I care a lots the name the film. In the film, Pike plays a ruthless, quite appointed legal guardian who is more keen on profiteering off her clients then catering for them, on caring for them, and her life starts spiling out of control after she doesn't properly vet one of her latest victims. While the film begins as a very dark comedy, it gratually becomes more of a thriller as she finds her selfmatching wits with someone who is just as ruthless and more dangerous than herself. And paid by Peter dinklage. He absolutely excels opposite Pike. There's also great support from Diane Waest as Pike's latest victim, who enjoys telling her that she's screwed and ends upsetting her on edge. I don't want to spoil the film too much, but absolutely dug it as a tale of twisted American dreams and what it takes to be successful. The film has based a bit of a backlash and reef recent months. I'm not sure what it is. I don't know if there's resentment over pike winning the Golden Globe over Maria but clover. But for everything that I've said in more including the representation of lesbian as of on screen, with it being a like non issue, the representation of a little person on screen with again being a complete nonissue. I just think there's a lot that really works in the film and I think it's a great motion picture. And said I say, I'm really, really enjoyed, I care a lot. I mean, yet they yet I'm going to say not quite great, but it's just so good. It's deliciously mean and sleep this is the film that's just loves being itself. It then joys all the darkness.

It revels in the mean spiritness of the characters and the abuses of the system, because it's just this stark satire of abuses against the elderly and a for profit system in the US just run a mock and left to sociopaths. It's it's just wonderful to watch. It's a lot of fun. My only critique, and it's just a very small critique, because there's so many great lines, it's so much strong humor there is that I would just like that satire edge to go one step up to just embrace it one hundred percent, because it's almost there. It's almost at that breaking point of just absolute met that insanity, but it's just stops just short, keeping itself a little bit more ground than perhaps that's better for most regular audiences and I just wanted to, you know, go specific way were attend to do films more. But it's just a great fun watch, so dark, so in spirited that I think anyone who love mean spirit, the the dark, satires that does the revel in it and loves doing what they're doing will love this. I also had a really great time with care a lot. It's the kind of film that leaves you grinning throughout most of its run time. It's, as Chris said, it's deliciously dark, very twisted nature and there's some excellent performances from a really great pass one thing that did disappoint me slightly was that I don't feel we saw enough of down Wast's brilliant character. I wanted to see more of her. She was excellent, just the strong, defiant matriarch who is certain that her sons will come and rescue her from the horrible position that she finds herself in, but it's got a brilliant soundtrack and it's a very unpredictable ride some brilliantly fitting characters and had a fully good time of it. So I'm going to be the disamething voice and I cannot. I mentioned first that esthetically I think the him is very successful. I think it had that that visually pops time right and with the sounds I gave and everything in all that works, which will is very fun. But I think something you mentioned, Chris, is really high as the problem I have with it. You mentioned it's almost there and being a satire, and so it's trying to yeah, it's having, it's taken you to too, trying to in some ways be with her but also condemning her, and that it's balance to me is completely off and that's why the thing just doesn't work from even though I definitely see it's it's quite it's yeah, it's interesting discussion to make about I care about as a satire. I think that, yeah, the film does definitely walk a bit of a lie there between whether it's totally with her or condemning her, and I would probably agree that the balance could be slightly more towards being with her, because it does not tinker off the edge. I think the ending, or what happens to at the end, I don't think really goes with the rest of the film and the way the films going in terms of, you know, promote, promoting, or maybe not, if not quite supporting or whatever, you know, sort of like showing off how different people might realize their own American dreams. So Yeah, look, I sort of understand that. I look, that didn't really ruin it for me because the film isn't just staying in there, as you know, a dark commy. It's not just that. I guess for me it graduates from a dark comedy into a survivalss sort of thriller with a two persons classing against clashing against each other. But it's a tricky balance to make and I guess sort of maybe why I like Rosin and Pike in the role because I don't like her as an actress. I have no idea what it is about her, but from die another day, up until in through until like gone, go off watch was the worst part of gone goal. But I guess I really like to in and I care a lot, maybe because I don't find her a particularly sympathetic actress to be get off with. I've never found on one who gives like particularly, you know, in depth performances. overwise found, I guess, a little bit shallow. It's sort of like work for me. But me, I guess, for somebody WHO's more into Rosamond Pike as an actress, you know, that might not quite be the right balance. I do love the fact that Tom Mentioning our soundtrack. I think a soundtrack is awesome and I'm not sure mentioned that also briefly, and the color scheme as an amazing color scheme are. So I do agree also with what Tom said. They could have more of dying we character in there, because she's excellent and I'll so devastated there's no Oscar bars but her. But yeah, know, just a really interesting motion picture. Maybe you're onto something with the husband Bake, because I'm a big fun of her and Goneam. So maybe there's a spectrum and we on opposite sides of the Positman Bank spectrum and they guess.

This takes us to mind number for, which is a film. I almost feel like you need to issue some kind of haunted warning for as yes, MOM CROG or Manor House by Christ pool is two hundred and one minutes long and it well, depending on the your sensibilities, either threatens or promises nonstop philosophy and theology on screen, and it's bars in setting an exposition. The action takes place almost entirely within an outside a large estate, the titler Manor House. As they reciting, couple and their guests, all members of the ruling class, enjoy and elaborate Christmas dinner. Throughout the evening, the engaged in indepth distructions of Christianity, war, politics, morals, enlightenment, Oh and of course, good and evil. One thing that is slowly intriguing here is just the quiet craft of Christy Furio. He varies the style in each scene is broken down into six chapters and each of them have very different ritual tones. Did they vary from? You know, for instance, being opposed entirely of intimate close ups or being shot from a far characters being obscured, and so many other small twists to keep the visual tension there, while the philosophical tension also grows, because it's a film which so much interpretation you don't know what it's actual goal is. Each character, have your own motivations and it's really just like looking into onto the faces of the old world, a world that we know disappeared. It's a dance film, probably a pretty difficult film and but it's also, for those who can enjoy it, totally immersive. You might even need to be in the right mindset here, but just this kind of immersive philosophical experience, almost like a bit of dinner with Andrew, with with very different atmosphere and tone, can just be all encompassing and engrossing, despite the fact that our protagonists are often being seated or standing still. Manor House can only be described as an active film. But perhaps of my cohost will disagree with this, but I really don't see a contradiction here, because it it actively asks you to engage in what you see, to make judgments and assessments and to try to reach your own conclusions and interpretations. I mean, if this sounds like your type of film, I cannot recommend it enough, but if it does not sound like your kind of film, you probably avoid it, unless you have some kind of massochistic intentions there, because anyone who's not into this kind of cinema will most likely not enjoy themselves. So, Ma'am Chrome is currently streaming on maybe and when Chris mentioned that it was in his hot over the year, I thought, you know, why not, I'll sit down and watched it. It's in the Khis do cinema top ten of the year, so it's an official check on Icem. Doesn't sound too bad. Could be interesting. So, you know, I sat down and I got up to the forty minute mark and all the characters were doing was standing around and talking, which you know, for the first you know, tell twenty minutes. It's like this is pretty edge you we're just going to have the character staying around talking and you know, kept going on, keep going on. That's about forty minutes and I looked it up online and yet not. Film aparently doesn't change from there. I'm just like know, life is too short for this. So I decided to stop watching mom Krog at forty minute mark. And I usually were twenty minute rule that if I get twenty minutes and I finished a film. But no, life was too short to finish it and the film is going to haunt me now because I don't have me. If I'm I don't know if I'll listeners have a movie account, but in my movie account, when I go and log in, it comes up as continue watching Moum crog every single time. It keeps recommending like continue watching it. I'm not. I want to get rid of this and I kin't. Like I don't. Must be some way, but watching you, I maybe Han all this is no, they can tell me, but I can't remove it from the continue watching her until the expires from movie. So I'm just think finally gets off movie so I can stop being hauning by this film that I absolutely hated. So I'm sorry, Chris.

That's my piece set on about it. I'm very jealous that soul was able to turn man called off, because it was a long three and a half hours and I didn't turn it off because I'm stubborn and once to start watching a film I have to see it through to the end, regardless of how I'm fine it because you never know, a film May improof it towards the end something else may happen, so I'm always willing to give it that chance. Have to say there are some positives. There's good set design, costumes and some relatively seriousable acting, but other than that, I found it to be a tough indurance test and it's not for me. But, as Chris says, is clearly a defies your film and if you are into that kind of thing then there is a high chance you're going to have a good time of it. So I want to apologize to Chris Quad not having web man cod because I feel like I could have supported him on this. Feels like a him that I could have liked maybe more than commins on. And so, yeah, but very use reasons the way I didn't get to it. Obviously the one time is a factor there. That just still I could have supported you, but you are alone because of my faintings. So I'm sorry, cris goers, about it. And Yeah, we got through then the we're still alive. And Yeah, all may eventually see it. If it never expires, maybe the pain of feeling that the reminder will just be too strong min actually pushing over the edge and make me feelish it. But the like have expise before I get that desperate. Yeah, it's not going to be a positive result. Well, with that, we're all too our number trees and that you you can once again kick us off. All right, so my number three is a French documentary title be Citien Sals, or the monopoly of violence. For its international title, it's a documentary that's not so much about the Jujun or yellow vests, riots that took place in front into thousand and eighteen and eighteen as it is about what it means to use violence in democracy. The international title is actually quite a good one. It refers to a concept developed by sociologist Max Weber in the early twenty century, and that is the idea that's when essential characteristic of the modern states is that it has the monopoly of legitimate violence, meaning all violence not committed by the state is illegitimate. David, you hand, the filmmaker is mostly going for a pretty typical talking heads approach, with two interesting touches here. One of them is that he is often confronting the people he's interviewing with images of the riots projected on the big screen, which gets particularly interesting when the people in question were involved in them on one side or the other. But the other thing, that's that's what unique, I think, to this film, out least I hadn't seen before, is that none of the interviews are identified during the film. You can obviously guess pretty easily that someone is a car por and academic or member of the usual based on what they're saying, but the choice not to have it on screen feels very much pointed. The kind of democratic approach to the talking heads idea that feeds yeah, generally novel to me and I think it's really appropriate to this subject matter. He is exploring how our modern democracies work and how they have to compromise themselves by this use of violence. He ends up by covering his basis at the end by showing you the people and this time telling you exactly who they are. But it's still feels like a pretty bold choice and it's in line with house smarts and how levelheaded the documentary is. Who's particular that your friend does not take a very kind view on some of the choices made by the French governments to fight the riot. It's not a piece of aged proper. It's a genuine attempt to reflect on the questions its rays is in how democracy deals with political violence, especially one whose origin story is deeply hooted in violence. I mean, most of them are, but our national anthem is a war song and the notion of the right to be volts is part of all the Publican history. Right. It's the same for the US and for many Democratic Company and this, this documentary doesn't offer easy solutions or condemnations. It's just generally asking questions in ways that feel all the more powerful because of the way that's your friend friends in and I guess I'll add that the a, the French title, is which a more ironic as opposed to see international title, which is very descriptive and the easy consation is like a country that is quiet, right, and it's refers to an incident that was filmed doing the riots, but it has a little more of a political edge to its. Let's still, I think what's I really appreciating this film is how levelheaded and open minded it is in exploring those positions. I think that what mure talks about there, in terms...

...of its democratic voice and not having introductions to the characters and having this kind of internal dialog about France makes it a little bit more difficult for people outside of rance to necessarily get each aspect of it, because I felt that someone who I know about these clashes but I don't have the in that knowledge to really be immersed in it and it feels like you should have even more knowledge and even more backstory. It almost lived through it like the French did, to truly get what the film is trying to do, because it feels a little bit more abstract when watching it from a far. It's good, it's intriguing. There's some really striking interviews, but just the fact that you know the interviews are not introduced until the end, which is a very nice poetic touch. When they do that, it does make you feel a little bit lost, it feels, if you don't get the introduction to the events that you might also just does feel like a really internal film that you know, doesn't take the time to explain all of the aspects of what happened. You can have to know more about it already is that would be my main warning to foreigners watching the film. But you can absolutely get something out of it regardless, because the interviews are strong, there are striking stories, there are there's brutal footage. It's very strong and well made film, but there may be some issues if you're not very immersed with these recent events. I would agree with Chris there. It's a very intriguing documentary, though I wish you explored more surrounding the background of the events, will not the riots and friends. I understand that it wasn't necessary for the filmmakers to do that together points across, but I would have liked to have learned more about the situation building up to it and that would have perhaps enhanced my appreciation of the film. And I still thought it was a neat idea to get members of the two opposing sides to come face to face and get a chance to speak to each other. So, even though it didn't resonate with me particularly, it was still an interesting documentary. Yeah, I think that choice not to texturize that much is both because it's not necessary for con childens, but also, yeah, because it's not your friends points. But I can see definitly how it detracts from from the experience. But yeah, basically the point of the theme applies to any riots, right people of Bel as matters just as well as as it does usual. It's just kind of the excuse or the reflect the reflection that he's having with these ins, because I definitely see how it can be descienting. Not Know the complex as word and the thing does not help him that much. And Alto Tom Wells, you're another three favorite film off two thousand and twenty. So my number three film of Two thousand and twenty is rent a pal. Now, in rent a Paler, the psychological impact of being a full time care for a loved one is the stepping stone for a powerful and traumatic thriller. A lonely bachelor known as David is fighting off depression and loneliness while struggling to take care of his house bound more and he tries to find love through a video dating service. Whilst doing so, he stumbles upon a strange VHS that offers companionship, but this tape slowly takes over David's life as the line between reality and his imagination begin to blur. And rent a pal is an imaginative and utterly captivating slow burn thriller that takes time to build up a sympathetic characterization of David, with a remarkable performance from Brian Landis in the lead role. There's humor throughout to alleviate the feeling of despair and hopelessness that invades David's life, and this allows us to warm to David and empathize with his plight and menacing turn from will wheaton as Andy, host of the VHS tape, which becomes such a huge part of David's life. It's a perfect counterpoint to David's introviated nature and now into play feel so natural that at times it's easy to forget that and he's just a video recording. There's a lot to unpack in rental power. It's social commentary is smart and affecting and the elements of horror towards the end of the picture really hits hard. This is an incredibly original, striking picture and it should be a central viewing for anyone who relishes dark and disturbing dramas, though. Finally, here's a Manee from the from all of the other host that I just love, and thank you so much for recommending it to me, Tom I mean this is it's with the it's clever and even based on the real story in a way. That actually was a rental friend video tape back in the day, which was so amazing to discover. But the way that read the power set up is so creative and the fact that it also ties in the use of vhs and the way it deteriorates and you know it's time and place. It has this kind of bleakly realistic, rectro dark comment. For me, the...

...mind trip going for it. Like you said, will wheaton is absolutely fantastic here and it just the way that David is actually just watches this tape and then slow stars do engage in the conversations with will wheaton to the point that I know he's stopping a tape, starting at tape timing, exact timing of when it's meant to answer based on the actual pauses within the tape. You can get into that dynamic relationship of actually becoming friends in the way with a vhs tape and you can also see what happens when that vhs tap stars to deteriorate and how glicchous. I just think it's such a fun film. It's such a darkly comedic, fun comedy Horror Thriller and I just essentially everything here works so incredibly well. That except, and this is the one place that I would disagree a little with with Tom the ending. I think the ending is a little bit too simple, little bit too conventional, because everything up until that point was so great. If you had that unique relationship, building that unique relationship with the vhs and then suddenly you get a fairly simple and easy conclusion. That clears things up, though there is also a post credit. See, that's it. That's quite hilarious. So highly recommended to everyone. It just shakes all of the boxes. I just think it's a really fun Great Watch. I also absolutely loved rent to how and that's coming as somebody who has video drome, as it is number one film. I thought there was a really strong video drone vibe throughout it because it's got a similar philosophy, I guess, with the relationship that we develop to what we watch. I mean as a striking image of him hugging the television set in a darkened room, which of course brings to mind that iconic shot of, you know, James Awarden's going in and kissing a television set in video drome, and the interactions between will wheaton and the protagonist also brought to mind for me Brian Oblivion's direct addressing of Max rerend on the videotape and what like, having that conversation with someone, and it's got that similar vibe to video drome. We're not sure how much of it's really happening, how much of it's I guess video hallucination, to use Kroniberg top terminology, but I yeah, the whole thing's a greably interesting. I do agree with Chris at the ending was slightly unsatisfying to me, but more because I wanted the film to make a bit clearer about whether it's all his mind or whether it's happening in real life, and the film doesn't want to go down that pathway. Aside from the video drames hush as well, I really liked about it was the whole red tape of the that goes along with the video dating system that they're going to be there to support and help their clients, but there's so many things in place or whatever with trying to get like get the number and get the matches, they're actually not helping out their clients at all. So I thought the irony of that was all quite interesting. I thought that got well tapped into the way that things went. A few very mixed about to enter palm already enjoyed it has a ducket comedy and that's actually had this very interesting character and very well when played by the main actor, by and then this Fulkins and well reason is really fun and really playing off his persona as someone who plays a lot of board games and the media with his youtube show. I don't know if you know about the tabletop, and there's a lot of of this vibe and they do play your game in this. I really enjoyed this, this Meta aspect and again I should that comedy. I think I was really liking this film, but I think the switch to Swiller and horror doesn't work from me at all and to beat really loses sight of the characters, and especially as a but the main character, but there's also a female character that I think is really used just as a prop by this film in a way that's I don't like. I think has a lot of great qualities. Again be basically the the first two thirds of the fame. I am quite good, but it just a whole package from you did not quite work. So I am I'm mixed on it. Yeah, I agree with that. I think that, like I said, the love interest, if you will, it's as a varying character as mainly there as a prop to drive some of the things to watch the conclusion, and I do also agree that the horror element is not as strong as the more darkly comedic element though during the eases, there then higher time. And Yeah, regarding with waking to have also seen a tabletop. It's it's really fun if you enjoy board games, and part of the what's so great about his performance in this film is just the fact it's so campy, an awkward. It's meant to we can't be an awkward this is like the most awkward, shareful and fake friend you could possibly get. And again, the best part of this film is really just having...

...our lead character, David, slowly go from this is, you know, ridiculous and fake, to developing a relationship with this rent, the PAL, and how those conversations change and how they can have different conversations with the exact same replies from will wheaton, because he is literally just a videotape, and the fact that those conversations become more and more different and more and more creepy and that you can even start early on the think, okay, what will these replies and responses mean later? What will happen later? And it that part of the film is so strong. So I can agree as a horror film, not that good, as a dark comedy and thriller, Really Really Good, and this that core of just David and the rent, the bout, and that's the best part, that's the fantastic part that keeps it makes this film so great to me. I really like how you mentioned will wheaton, the villain, as a camping over the top, and which he is, but at the same time is also menacine. As the film progresses it becomes creepy and it gets quiet unsettling, and I would agree that the horror elements of perhaps the weakest aspect to the film, but I'd still say that they are very strong, I think, for it directorial debut, it's really impressive feature because it balances it a mix of genres. Got The comedy there in the horror and the thrill elements, and it does so really well and I'm very excited to see what John Stevenson works on next, because if he continues to make films of this caliber, think he's going to turn into very interesting filmmaking. I couldn't agree more. So we go to Saul what this your too, a favorite film of Twenty one day. There are not a lot of films that have made me laugh out loud in a movie theater packed with strangers. I try to restrain myself a bit when watching comedies in public. But, for whatever the case, maybe the film films that have caused me to laugh out loud in the cinema screening are firmly implants into my mind because it just doesn't happen a lot. My number three is one such comedy of film that had been laughing out loud for minutes after certain scenes had ended the previous time that I remember laughing so that all the in public was the tomato sauce seen in parasite. So what was this film that caused me to lose myself? My number three of twenty and twenty has a moronic title. Literally, it's called by more in English. It's a French comedy, that one that the most recentcies are award for best film. It's something that I initially had no interest in seeing it because of how stupid the title made it sound, and then the comments started coming in, the review started coming and on the ICM forum and it became intrigued and I started to finally catch up with it while they're still showing in my local art house cinema. So the film by morals is about an IT expert who the police hilariously mistake for a psychotic killer. After a bundled suicide attempt, he and his into an odd pact of the dime woman to clear his name. She has the only evidence of his innocence and will only help him out if he helps her to find a lot long lost son them. Some of the humor is inquestible taste. There's a bit that most disabilities, though absolutely love the blind character myself. Most of the punslow are sharply aimed at incompetent policeman. Particularly funny is one detectors over analysis of the protagonist possible motives for shooting up its workplace come out with some of the most absurd reasons imaginable, with everybody else in the room nodding and agreeing. The film takes some fun stabs at bureaucracy to and the vulnerability of buildings that rely to heavily on technology, and there's an absolutely hilarious part with a couple of elevators at a building that go completely out of control. So yeah, it was just a very hilarious, funny involving film with just a lot of your really unexpected parts. Initial suicide attempt just had me laughing for minutes afterwards, with everybody's panic reactions to it. A lot of how you explain it? Laughing at the suicide ascent. It sounds so wrong, but if you see the film you'll you'll certainly see why. So I'll find it so music. So Bye Morens was my number four film the year, and and it's a touching French comedy with all the charm of a Jean Pierre's you know film. It tells the troubling tale of a mother and a quest to find the baby she gave up for adoption when she felt pregnant as a teenage, and this journey becomes even more eventful when she crosses paths with the aforementioned suicide or businessman. Director Albert dupontell clearly takes great pleasure in sending up the bureaucracy of the ruling authorities, and there are homages to Terry Gilliams Brazil. That a service musing perspective. It's a crazy and unpredictable film, with a Quirky sensibility that makes it hard to predict what may come next, and the emotional finale is perfectly fitting and helps to establish by by morons as...

...a surefire crowd pleader of a surprising amount of heart. Yeah, how to agree? I mean as a comedy about the up through side. Essentially it's a it's a blast, it's so stylish and the comparisons to John Beer gun that are spot arm or perhaps we can compare it to the films off debulshed in the Yoko on the mail as well. It's that exact type of over stylization, this kind of cute sere elements, this type of risual play. Riddist is this this hyper stylized world with this kind of almost cute orally ristral expression, where just everything is kind of comedic, everything is kind of stylized and it works really, really well. I think the one thing I have to say here, though, is that while a lot of the humor hits but all it does feel a little slighter than the best films by Jett and Vonder. Well, a lot of differences. The character ending seems a little bit less thought out, a lot of the humor seems a little bit lighter and we I'm not really probably don't want to go into the ending, but I was no some people of the ending. I was not that an armored bite. It seemed almost a little bit random, given what, especially one of the characters, have been trying to do. I'm torn a little bit on the film, but it's a very good film. It's just filled with last filled with great stylings. So definitely recommended to everyone. So a dually come by by moans bitch, which, by the way, it is a good translation of the title. Do it. It's more like fairwere on small. Final, it's a thing that I actually had a lot of expectation for because I'm really like and build you can tell in general. I don't know if you guys are familiar with him as a thingmaker or as an actor. He's quite well known figure informs, but one of his previous themes of one oh I'll see you up there, is Ah my Lond and so I was really expecting this one and I'll lend somewhere closer to Chris. I really love the worlds that you can tell sets his stories in. You guys mentioned Jeanquie Johne and Harry Gilliam, who actually had a cameo in the film. That's definitely spot on. Know and all of his things are like this and really enjoy being in them. But maybe it's because it's a controvert contemporary setting that I had a little more trouble way that apposed to sorce other things that are that are period things. But yeah, I don't know. I had some issue with the tune. Like Chris, I was not a big fan of the ending. But that being said, I think it's overall just, we say hormonesque in French, to like an album in that kind of improbable things are happening all the time and it's has that that adventure, that rhythm that is is really good and that the humor that saw mentioned and I think in generally works right well, and usually if you had the lead actress and people tell himself very cosmatic and very funny. I don't know, I don't know what to do with this thing. I guess in some ways it wasn't exactly what I expected, and maybe that's unfair of the but it is successful at what it's trying to do. I think I just never quite got on his on its wavelength a hundred percents. That being said, if you like this kind of universe, I really recommend watching his other things, especially see you out there. That's a great recommendation. But they haven't seen anything else by dupontel, but I will see that. The directing style, the way they camera moves, that cinematography a lot of just the way he times comedy as well. It's pot arms. I would really like to see what they would do with in the material. There might be even more inclined to like. So this was a really strong film. I totally enjoyed it. If he has even stronger films out there, I can't wait to see them. Yeah, I did just start check. Well, mature was talking, and no, I haven't seen anything else by do puntel. So this is the first film I seen him. So I guess I was entering with different expectations. I had heard some very mixed comments also, so, even though some people are comparing it's like Brazil and Emily, and some people would saying, you know, it's a terrible film. So I guess I was had like lowish expectations going into it. I was curious about more than anything else, and I guess the film just blew me away. I guess. You know, as Tom said before, never would expected a suicide comedy would be be are quite so histerically funny in terms of the ending. I like it. I Chris described it as random. I'm not sure. I think I'll actually describe it as maybe inevitable. It's all the way that things will go and and go, because the film is all about, you know, policing, competence and bundling of detectors. Are overanalyzing things to take things out of context and looking at incorrect way something the way they actually end up going. It's sort of inevitable. But yeah, no, I don't know. The film just really worked for me. I think you've got a point with that about the...

...ending song. That's why I mentioned expectations, not just in expecting that it would be good. That's not the only thing I meant. It's also, I guess when we got to that ending I realized that's maybe I wasn't yeah on the films waving, because the ending, I think, I agree that you would make sense for him that I did not. I guess it did not make sense to me in some way. So I should probably watch it at some point. But I see what both of you are saying really about. Yeah, I'll say the same thing, or almost. I think that ending was definitely where it wanted to go. I think it makes complete as one of the characters, but just given what one of him, what the other carecter, had been trying to do and the motivation like character had to even participate. No of this may the end they make a little bit less sense to me. But yeah, like I just said, it's a really good film. You definitely see it, and that probably takes a sour to my third favorite film, which is not a charming comedy, not at all really. It is there is no evil by Muhammad, also loose, and this may be one of the bravest denunciations of the oppressive Iranian reshime and what is accepted as the rule of law. There is no evil, leaves the while just on the edges and focuses on the Mundan it did the familiarity in the intimacy of life, all amidst actions and choices of deadly and everlasting consequences, you know, in exploring close relationships and the choicest people make or do not make. There is no evil places and emphasis on submission or assistance in what soon becomes clear to be Ann win situation. Disconnected team carries through for separate stories capturing entirely different emotional motives. Characters stories levels of tensions, and this leads us to sneaking realization of just this somber life that has this kind of terrible edges just to the side of your view. And I really can say much more than that without spoiling the film. I mean what the perhaps can say is that each of the stories ends up, in one way or another, linking itself to the idea of a specific kind of state violence, and of a particularly strong and controversial kind. It attacks so many punches, and let's just put it like this, without against spoiling anything, the first encounter in the film with this evil in question it just seems to come out of nowhere and it's just turned into a gateway of exploring these ideas of whether regular people really have a choice and the consequences of the choices they make. It's a stunningly bleak, clear film that I think will have a lot of effect act on almost anyone who watches it. I'm really pleased that Chris brought this film to my attention because it's so far in this episode it seems like we've not seen I who eye on his nominations, but I've got to say that this was a beautifully shot film with for powerful stories limp thematically. This explore, I wouldn't say it because Christen want to say, but explore a traumatic act that has an impact on those affected by it. Now I could have quite happily watched a feature length film on each of the four short stories. They're hugely engrossing and the performances capture the raw emotional turmoil of those whose lives thrown into disarray by the tragic offense at the that we witness here, though. It's a great film, highly recommended and narrowly missed out on a placement in my top ten of the year, and this is one of two films in this episode. Of number comes number two, which I'm waiting for. cinemadies here in the form, really looking forward to it. The way you discredit spot really songs of my Audi like something out I would like about. So we looking forward to yeah, hope all of our listeners will also make a choice of seeking out there is no evil in the cinema, if you can, and anywhere else if the cinematter is not an option. And that actually concludes our tourd favorite filter onto our thinking very film. Of they are already and once again. We can start with Matya, Yep. So my number two is Lenu it, or the swarm. That's the French whole thing. That's one of the most tense and uncomfortable experiences I've had in a...

...cinema in the why? That's even accounting for the COVID closures. And it's about a woman with two children who is trying to make a living of raising locusts in the French countryside. You just see people. The director really milis the kind of reaction we tend to have, or at least I do. I know some of my co hosts don't feel the same way to insects, of if not disgusts or feeling, often at least the feeling of being uncomfortable, maybe because insects are the animals that build the most human life societies in some ways, with these complex, almost industrial structures. When then big numbers swamp, if you wal, they're scary because you feel like they're kind of better organized than we are and therefore are always a potential threats. And PHILIPO really uses all of that cultural baggage. I mean locusts are one of the pigs of Egypt, for all its work very gradually raising the tension, mostly through sound design, as the incident causes the insects to become much more active. He's essentially telling the story of a woman who has tried to get back to some sort of an assistinal lifestyle, like many people are doing today with climate change, that who just cannot actually make it work and has to surrender herself something that becomes industrial, or almost, and insects are the perfect metaphor, but that oppressive side of industrialization, of productivity. They always buzzy around, always active, and Philippo patiently builds tremendous tension out of that and with that finally reaches its boiling points. It's very much fulfills the expectations is built up. For me, we do get a great horror finale, even though I have some quarts with the note to film ends on, but aside from that it's just an excellent finance sequence. He delivers everything that I feel Howard those best, which is to use a pretty blunt metaphor about modern life while exploiting our fears of both natural things, this case locust, and of what aspect of humanity those things can represents. It's a debut feature and the fruits of a new program made to finance French genre films, which have often been underfunded in all state sponsed system. It's been a recurring issue that ask any French sinnified, they always complain about Genre Hav a good place here. So, as such, I don't think. I think this film is one of the best examples of what art can bring it to table, wrench out house tile in some ways, but because it is a psychological drama that veers into horror, even though it's there from the beginning, and I think it's just very effective all of our I love how you kind of try to sell to the art house class out in that is just the horror seeped into the psychological art house drama. And yes, it's pretty much what I loved here as well. I mean the core is actually an almost minimalist, not quite, but just this very bare boned temple family drama would limited dialog. We just feel their emotional dates and then you have this activity of the swarm that's just build so much read especially as things starts to go slightly wrong and you see the mother engaged in something that could end up in a very, very terrible way. I mean read is just built into it all along the way with such simple tools, and I agree completely that. You know, the swarm is almost metaphorical or just next bee, both in terms of climate change, et Cetera, but also this in terms of the mother's emotional state. There is aial does an extension of her and do what she does with them is gross, it's disturbing, it's powerful it visually and emotionally, and all of this is so this bills more and more dread, more and more and more tension onto this already stripped back suspenseful family drama where we're just feel the atmosphere is about to explode. And like you, I might have some reservations about the ending, with you know, truly enters that horror territory and just like I said with Randapal, it takes some, maybe it's slightly more simple, solutions. They're but like from beginning to end it it's such an emotional roller coasters, so suspenseful, so strong, and it's just such a strong cinematic I mean that the camera work, the tension, just everything that goes into this is shot and feels like a strong psychological drama. So it's just highly recommended to both camps really people of Horror, people who love are till Sema, people are just love strong dramas. It has all of it there, with that extremely uneasy dread of some kind of oncoming terror from the locusts.

So highly recommended to essentially everyone. Oh and now available on Netflix. Yeah, the swarm didn't quite do it all for me. I did end up saying on a Netflix, because that's how it has been released in Australia. So I don't know, maybe it would have been different as a cinematic viewing, but the psychological drama that the two of you have talked about just did absolutely nothing for me. I actually thought it was more like melodrama, or soapopular level. We've got, you know, the teenage girl being bullied. There's a mention of a dead father who may man of committed suic slide and then that's overlooked at it's never mentioned again and and you know she's resentful of a mum because of mum's you know, doing something that's a little bit revolting or disgusting to some people, and you know there's issues with the brother. or so it's like Blah, blah, blah, Blah Blah. Anyway, you know, after about an hour or so the horror does kick in and that's what I actually started to really like the film. And just a little bit of warning to anybody listening hasn't seen and I am going to spoil a little bit of the swarm, because I don't think I really discuss my reaction properly with our spoiler. So you guys have been more warned. Okay. So what the film gets to eventually is what I thought was a bit of a throwback to the mad side just films of yesteryear, because the mum becomes increasingly obsessed with our feeding and breeding the Mosquitos and Mosquitos the locusts. So she feeds and breeds the locusts by feeding them human blood, which is all that actually really interesting, especially when she decides to use a home her own blood in it. But the way I sort of see that going is something more akin to little should horrors. In little should horrors you've got the talking plans and you're feeding humors to the talking cloud and that's sort of where I saw you know, the swarm going or whatever, with, you know, her feeding pets to it and, you know, try and feed other people did it, just to get that in sociable human blood. And then it gets to the stage where she's using our own blood the food, and which I think just goes to the absolute you know, depths of you know where they're on the mad sids can go. Reminds you a bit of brundle fly from the fly by chrone and Burr with how bolve she gets in it. So all of that I thought was really interesting, even though the film doesn't play out the black comedy, just the whole obsession with it. It was actually not getting the blood, getting a locust to I'm swarm because of the blood and also the whole we know pro Veganis a message that comes along with it. You know that she's breeding these locust in order to be eaten as protein snacks, but instead the locust that eating, or atleast feeding on humans. So thought that was all really cool. But all that's in the last third, maybe, if I'm generous, last half of the film. The entire first half of the film, though, is just this I'm sorry as to say it boring, absolutely boring mellow drama that I couldn't, you know, possibly stand so? Overall, I think I liked the film because it ended on a strong note. But just the lead I was just before the horror ignited had me, you know, sort of you know go where's this going? I feel as if I've watched a different film to Chris and Matthew and, like Solo, is quite bored from the first half the film and, to be honest, I didn't really feel like it it went anywhere. I'm rarely on board with creature features. At a trouble banging to them locusts. I just don't see them as scary. I used to keep locust when I was younger. Don't find them repulsive in the slightest and they think it's a neat idea. But it didn't make much of an impression on me. Maybe if had it got something out of their psychology called drama aspect that Chris and Matt you mentioned, it might have done something for me. But as it was, the creature feature aspect didn't really scare me or disturb me to any length. And, as I said, the psychological aspects can really work for me either. So bit of a lukewarm, tapid response from me. And okay, diversion bought nothing to really write home about. Yeah, it's really interesting that you say that. Look has done of disturbing to you at all, because, yeah, it makes sense that the thing would not work for you then, because, yeah, I think I think it really relies on the control associations we have with it. And yes, so if you find them pleasant to be around, a lot of what the film does is just not going to work. The fact that you guys didn't respond to the psychological drama, yeah, I guess if you're if you want more of adcomed yet of it yet it's just not going to give you that. And I definitely get how it can feel a bit so serious, I guess because it is. I think it's using the metaphor to talk about the world we live in in way that is serious, and if you don't get into that, I definitely see how it how it can be boring. But yeah, I was very, very into its from the start and I think the sound design is really a huge part of that, and also very good performance by the man I caused. May I guess, you turn my him out at this.

I really like something else I just thought on mention because I was going to respond to Alearlier skip what's flipped my mind. With insects, I do actually fun create piece. So, unlike Tom I did find the locust creepy, especially when I was crawling over that boy's finger at the other start and eating as water off. But I find them creepy not because you know that they're so well organized I think they might overthrow us. I think it's because they look so different from mammals. So you saw of you know, you see a door, we see a car. Even if you see a lion or whatever, it's got very similar facial features to us. But insects, with like eyes on either side of the face, they're not like in the front of the face or with may different sets of eyes, may just sets of legs, look very different to humans, much more than mammals do. So for that reason I found creepy. So yeah, that part of it work for me, I guess, even though the Melo drama still wasn't quite my cup of tea. I think this one thing I will disagree with is the melodrama part, because I didn't really see any MELO drama in it. I agree that there are elements of the plot that should be constrough as mel dramatic and could be melodrama to give play that way. But I just think that when the style is so subdued and bleak and slow burning, you know you don't, least to me, that can't be melodram because melodrama needs to have a certain degree of over the top delivery and on your sleeve emotion. I mean it doesn't always have to be a doubless or if necessarily, but there has to be something extra. When it borders like this kind of more beer bold, near minimalist, slow burning presentation as here, I guess I personally would never call it Melo drama. And also it makes it work better for me because it's simplify that much new. Take the words out of it and it's more about their emotions and more conventional character set up, for instance, doesn't bother me. Yeah, I agree with that. That's much more stritched down to me. That's something that could become drama. But about your point, so I agree. That's obviously part of wepikes insects, a good horor monster. That is how different they are, but it's a combination of the two right. I think it's also a reason why we often use insects for Adians, right, or insect like creatures. Obviously mostly used humanoids because we love to talk about ourselves, but when we don't, it's often insects like creatures, right. That you as aliens, and I think that's telling. But you don't have bovine aliens. Not so much. No, it's a good point out the aliens, but you know, I haven't actually are found up and asked for release, Scott, or maybe I should or whatever. But you know, like with the Zeno Morphs, I think the reason why they're scary is because, you know, they're like insects that look so different to us, rather than because of, you know, the the capacity we organized. That was the only point I was getting on with a melodrama. I actually take the point you guys sell on more and I guess describing the film as a melodrama would be misleading because it is quite slow burned paste. It's more that it's got burst or melow drama. So there is a lot of slow burn. There's a great, you know, overhead shot as it's like driving along, and darkness at the start. There's lots of great slow atmospheric moment whenever the characters Inter Rt. You know, it felt like I was watching a soap opera. But you know, up to me it's personal thing. I guess. The eye drama between the mother and daughter in particular, and between the dater and the other bully is just Ya, did absolutely nothing for me. Yeah, I guess it's more question of so seriousness. But if you think that does take it ome seriously, I think you can say that as a criticism of it. If you think doesn't work, I think maybe that's where you're getting it. Yeah, can I worry without do every if it doesn't work, especially if you don't find local scary the ill serious, this could definitely resent people the wrong way. But moving on from that, Tom what is your number two favorite film? Off Two thousand and twenty? My number two film is quoveds Ada, which is an earth shattering account of the Bosnian genocide that took place in one thousand nine hundred and ninety five, told primarily through the experiences of Aida translator working for the UN, who is stationed at a compound set up as a safe haven for refugees. This compound becomes inundated by a citizens escaping from the Serbian army. And when the army made their approach, Aida does everything within her power to protect those she love. Now, the cinema, very say style, places us in the center of the unfolding nightmare. Is the camera follows aid around the compound and she's desperately seeking the way out to the situation for family. The style of filmmaking or feel familiar to those fond of the work of Paul Green Grass, such as Captain Phillips and Bloody Sunday, and it depicts the true horror of the events with an authenticity that shakes you to the core by placing you in the heart of the action. The powerful performance by Jasna do a chick, I hope my pronunciation is on point there in the central role of Aida, provides an emotional hook that resonates long after the credits of finished rolling.

She encapsulates the fighting spirit of a fearful move it in a haunting way that really brings to film to life. Aida story is harrowing and devastating. They were needed to be told, as it sheds a light on a deeply disturbing event in recent history. That provides an important lesson for anyone who watches it. This is exceptional filmmaking with a vital message, and that is why I quoved this idea. Is My second favorite film of Two Thousand and twenty. Yes through at this either is a great film and, if another slow burning human drama, but it out a swarm of locust threatening on the on the far instead it is the Serbian army. I think that it is a very good in reduction to events that may already be forgotten by many, by many people in Europe. I mean, this was one of the last real wars in Europe and I think it's fairly close to home. And it is covers everything from the capitulation to the drama of the refugees and just a terror and fear incredibly well. It's a very effective story. It shows just how broken these people are. It shows how desperate the ideas show how the everyone feels as something worse is coming, and also this sense of essentially almost walking into their own doom. I don't really have much negative to say, but it means a great film. There's no pretensions. It is even not that much sentimentality, maybe a little bit towards the ending, but it's just a very good almost the just showcase of what's happened. I do think that human drama the center of it is a little bit constructed, but that's just so we have some characters to actually care about and be drawn into, and that part works perfectly well to it's not an overly visual film, but that's not needed. It has all of the emotional power right there. It has carried so many heavy punch shots. It's a very heavy film to watch and I do think it's, you know, being so effective as this, dealing with such dround feelings as it does and covering it in such an expensive way. I think everyone will at the very least get something out of it. So highly recommended to everyone listening. It's a very strong film that the most likely, if not bring you down, put a bit of a damper on your day, but in the best way that films can't do that. It's definitely a difficult for you and experience. Quase, I would agree with you there. Even if it wasn't based on true events, it would be a however, and watch and these films I always get something out of them. They really resonate with me. But the fact that it's based on a true story and it's such a bleak and tragic tail. It really struck a Chorde of me. Very emotional film, very draining, but also very rewarding and very important to hope that some listeners will go and check it out based on our recommendation, and me too, and I think also for all of us who knew what would happen and knew what the development of this war is. There's also additional emotions put in here. And there's the way it's so bureaucratic, the way so much of it is still called, the way you see the UN essentially failing, being a eve not standing up enough. It's just such a disheartening watch and you can probably, being in the Times really now, obviously, with Afghanistan, etcetera as well, be bring lots of contemporary parallels to so it's just a very strong film that field delivers. It's emotional, punctious, as I mentioned. I think you know, the one I'm looking forward to seeing later this year when it comes out. And moving on to Sall's second favor of field, which is actually my second the favorite film of the year as well as so I'm really excited to hear what he has to say about it. Okay, so my second favorite film of Two Thousand and twenty and Chris as second favorite film of Two Thousand and twenty. Actually, I can't speak for him, so to speak for my personal experience. It's a movie that I wanted to see from the moment I first sawt play. Other for it. The trailer was deliberately vague and suggestive, and all that I really knew about the film going into it is it was about a young woman getting the upper hand on Pretrey men and it starred carry mulligather. That's all I knew about it. The film is, of course, promising young woman from Emerald fell. The film is one of those movies best in and...

...into with few expectations that takes us in quite a wild ride, but suffice to the side of the film principally focuses on right sexual abuse and a culture that sweeps such crimes under the carpet. The movie actually has something more universe or offer. It's populated by guilty characters who constantly claim that they are nice or they are good human beings, and the only character actually admit to doing something bad on the film was declared insane and made a take leap by his company, so that characters are lawyer who defended one of the predatory men, played by Alfred Melina and an absolutely amazing performance, and I think that's quite a strong part of the film. There's not just about, you know, predatory men and, you know, rape in getting away with it. It's about the our culture in which these people still see themselves as good people or Nice people, and those who admit to making mistakes are discipline for it or make to take leave. And, like I said, I'll from Millina, is absolutely excellent in the film, but not to do all on him. This is carry Mulligan's film first and foremost, and right up until the end, with her condescending their sarcastic way of talking down to men and her more vulnerable moments alone, my like and hits every note perfectly. The film is a little bit bombastic and, while emotionally affecting, the ending doesn't totally gel for me, but with all the measured doses on me and pot music, dark comic relief, is an experience that really lingers. The film stayed with me the entire night after watching it in the cinema and I'll still thinking about in the morning. Afterwards. I wouldn't quite go as far as Kong speech one of our forum users, who believes that it's the best film ever made. However, she's not far off the mark. It's a truly great film for the ages and actually spell boundance one number two and that actually managed to find something even better, because that's how great film Promising Young Woman is. I mean, I think this promising a woman in a way is like a combination of what the both of us love. So you have this kind of pop art style that you obviously fell in love with, for instance in I care a lot, and then it has that added, you know, philosophical and sociological and me at a commentary, and it's satirical twists that I absolutely loved this one. I mean when I talked about I care a lot not going all the way, promising young woman does. It takes those esthetics, it takes that play, but then it also speaks directly to the audience in the way not by actually just breaking the fourth wall. It doesn't by making everyone terribly uncomfortable. This is a black comedy, is that bleak black comedy and a satire the just consistently makes us we see at every turn. Well, mixing in this over the top or esthetic elements, so much play and fund and style, with extremely a nerving real social teams that have been obviously been brought to the front over the last few years. And I think what you brought out that so important with this film is that characters that do quite terrible things, so it's so atrocious things, even believe they're perfectly nice people. And this is just such a large part of the fabric. And I've been reading interviews with Emerald and Ale, which is, says, such a know, specifically cast characters in these Nice Guy Rolls, if it will, that you know, could have been expected to hold down, you know, a lead in a romantic comedy, like people like get Adam Brow different instance. It's like a nice consistently being stabbed in your dark because it's such a bright, colorful, pleasant visual world, if if you can say that, and then you have so much darkness inside it that stabs atude at all points. It's just showing how society in so many ways is broken and how the norms are broken and how people believe that completely unacceptable behavior, up to an including rape, is kind of acceptable and all of these people who create stories that they're nice. May All just be lying to themselves and they're just different characters, are at different levels of vastness and or oversteps, and it's kind of like it's having a conversation with all these again, like are you these people? Are you just lying to yourself? Like would you ever cross the line and how far would you cross the lines of very unnerving, like I said, film in in this regard, especially, I think, from male audience members who may think of how either Dave Act or your friends may have acted or how society arounds them act, that it's just a really confrontational film,...

...and it also is confrontational against women, how they act and how they accept the oversteps of men around them. So it's just such a great great films that manage to take something so urgent to instantly political and punch you in the faith with it over and over again, while maintaining this phron atmosphere and this dynamis them. That just for me, it's all the note. It's a wonderful film. I won't even go on the negative against the ending, though it's probably one of the slighter part of the film, it does knocks it out of the park. It's one of the best films, not just off the year but of the decade, maybe on an extended all time list as well. It's just absolutely fantastic in every way. So this is an interesting thing to discuss in the context of this this to five, because I feel like it relates a lot to some of the films that I had some issues within. Black went to Balin and I cannot. But it actually gets that balance rights, that the total balance that Chris, you mentioned, of this curbic take on the on the Nice Guy Archetype, but with this very pop and fun visuals time and yeah, I think it's a very difficult balance to find in this redefines it's in part because of carry mood again, who is very charismatic performer and very precise actress. And I think amout final this is did you film? But yes, she the to one. Is What's key about the stream and she manages it. They when I be with saw about the Alina see, which is a standout, but to me the the best part of the him was the Hood Ball Burnam. It's I guess under who to discredits, but yes, the whole thing with Bill Burnham, I think, is perfect engastigation of what the thing is doing at its test. I do have some issues because mentioned ending. We I don't know if you get into it, because I do have some issues with that. But although I think this really, yeah, really gets the balance right, and it's a very hard thing to do that, it's remarkable in bat one, promising you, woman is a very strong revenge film. I really enjoyed it and that's just so much to discuss about it. When I watched it with my partner Sarah, she really enjoyed the feminist and goal of the film and it paved the way for some great discussions and I love that about a film and there's lots to unpack and think about after watching it. One thing that I did fan quite John was some of the music choices which were a little off putting. The scene in the pharmacy where they were dancing and sing into Paris Hilton felt really how to place. But most of the soundtrack worked really well, particularly the reworking of Britney Spears as toxic. Thought that was a great choice to include that. Now I want to go briefly into spoilers here. So spoiler warning for anyone who's listening who hasn't seen the film now. I find it really interesting how meticulous the plans of carry Mulligan's characters were throughout the film. Everything was, you know, executed perfectly. She had everything planned out. And then it really bug me when, towards the end of the film, here I'm doing, when the person she his she is exacting revenge on, breaks out of handcoff and that causes are undoing. It feels to me that everything beforehand has been so perfectly executed that that couldn't be a mistake. And my interpretation of it was that she actually intended to die soon as she's exactly revenge. That's it. She's completed emission. You know, she'd had enough and she wanted to be out of there, and I was just curious to find out if the other CO hosts had a similar tiptation of me or whether, I don't know, embarking at the wrong tree. So yeah, I'd love to know if what your thoughts are on that. Yeah, I think that's a valid point. And the ending, or so you heard, big going a little bit also. So I think I agree. She's had so much meticulous planning there it does seem strange and something as was that could tripp or are. I guess what got to me about the ending is you're having her and she's obviously pretty coded. These next messages to come and arrived, and the text messages arrived on the guy's phone at the exact moment that the police turn up, and the police turn up at the exact right moment interrupt the wedding. So there's a lot on of convening. A coincidence is going on over there doesn't quite add up to me. I mean, even though you can say, okay, well, she got out from million, it's send text messages and he's there, so we can time it, how can they actually time for the place to ride at the wedding at that point? How can the Times that takes something exactly that many minutes or else to find the body and then go and enshort the plans at the wedding? The tiring them, the coincidental nature of it is what made my number two rather than my number one of the year, although it's still a basic film...

...in terms of her motivations. Will come at the same thought Tom that maybe she did really intend to die, because it is such a strange thing to slip up on. I have a split mind on that. Actually part of that. It's definitely something across my mind that it could be that she actually intended to die, though the alternative is Altso that it's very realistic partially. Got To that if a woman consistently tries to exact revenge our men, that is are physically stronger than her, it can really easily go very, very wrong and, just to insert a degree of very brutal realism, they're as well. So that's I have a split mind on that topic. Don't vot. Don't vote interpretations. I think the work quite well on the ending like it is. Yeah, I were. It's a very easy ending. It wraps it up almost a little bit too neatly. But, unlike soul, I don't really see promise a young woman as a realistic film. I do see it as a satire. Do Sey it with a film that just plays around the wants to throw these punches. I want to have a start these conversations, though. I don't really place the focus on realism in that ending at all. I don't think it's neither. I think it's it's played as a joke in a very fun way that it works it is one of the slighter moments of the film, but for me at least, it worked. And just one more point about Tom said, I don't actually think that Parry Shilton Song is out of place in this film at all. I think it's actually ties in with the sallistic choices extremely well. So you have these pop songs throughout that's associated with young women, it's associated with, you know, not really being respectable or high culture or it's kind of like this pushed under the rug, and I think what the film is really well is this takes a lot of I guess, prejudiced and a lot of thoughts about essentially this this disc over feminine rule that terrible against. CASSANDRA is playing at too, because she is pretending to be this rarapid the women who are drunk and who are easier to take advantage of, like that's part of her act and I think the film plays the same act. It has that stite, has that soundly test that it's just there. Eventually, it has that kind of innocent ribe and then it tricks you and I think that's those two things go so well together and I think that's why that those strong choices work as well as they do. Yeah, just want to adde agreements to to went it's just said. About that poy symptom scene. I think it's the film is best reading, really playing with audience expectations. The choice is very pointed. It's supposed to be in some way out of place but also perfect for what the it is doing. I think. Yeah, I can totally get that angle. On the Power Hilton Song, I think for me the whole production was very slight, almost quite cool and stylistic up until that point, but that song it feels awkward and Cringeworthy and, as you said, maybe that was the intention, but it felt jarring for me and took me out of what I've been up to that point of, you know, a brilliant experience and just kind of knocked it back slightly and how I felt about the film. But that was a great discussion. A lot of you could actually break into spoilers. They're because if you actually put dark top tense together, probably the young woman, just based on how much we disagree in general, would have topped that list, which rolling make it interesting for you to hear about our number one favorite film of Two Thousand and twenty. But, as I can see we're already running close to the two hour mark here. Let's say that for next time. In our glorious conclusion, thank you all for listening and doing this again soon. You have been listening to the talking images, official PODCAST OF ICM FORUMCOM.

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