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Talking Images

Episode 17 · 1 year ago

Best Films of 2019: Our Top 5s

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The time has come to reveal our very favourite films of 2019.

In this episode Chris, Clem, Matthieu, Sol and Tom go through their top 5 films in detail.

We also give each film more and more time to each film as we get closer to the top.

The big shock here is that there were only 3 films that are on two lists, and even more shocking, no films were on more than 2 lists.

There were 25 possible slots, and in this episode, we will cover 22. Pretty incredible, and some really big films did not make it into the episode either - don't be mad.

You are listening to talking images, the official podcast of ICM Forumcom. Welcome back everyone. I'm Chris and in this episode, Clem Mature Tom Salm, I will talk you through our top five films of two thousand and nineteen. The structure is really simple. will go in a circle where each of us percent our fifth choice done, gone for all done, and we want our four choice to a choice checking stories and finally, our number one, personal favorite film of two thousand and nineteen. In the cases where a film is a multiple lists, will skip it for this spot and allow the person who loved it the most to present it. This is also because, as our loan for the films grow, each film will be given more and more time. I have note, though, overlaps are a shockingly minor exception here. There are actually only three films that aren't two lists. None are more. There were twenty five open slots in total, and this means that we will cover twenty two whole films. So that's just incredible. This gets so easily. Have become a ten film episode. So before we get started, less do the mandatory moment of introduction where you hear each of my cohost voices and can attach a little bit of personality to each of them and to make it slightly more interesting, but of the throwing a very quick assessment of the year that was before we started for the play. If they let's do enoughobatical order, starting with clam. Okay, Hi everyone, my name is then. I'm from friends. Two Thousand and nineteen is not a year I'm very familiar with at this point, obviously because it was on the last year and I feel like films usually yet exposed after a few years before it, because it gives us more time to explore said years and go through the biggest film of the year and also give us time to explore. I feel like we haven't discovered everything that's this yere up to give, but I think the selection of films we have is a pretty good one to start with. Hi, I'm mature, also from friends, and two thousand and nineteen was, I suppose, maybe not the best here if I'm looking at my list overall, but that's what I don't really believe in years being that much better than others. High it's Tom from England. I'm excited to share my top five films of two thousand and nineteen with you today. I thought that two thousand and nineteen was quite a solid year in terms of the quality of films that I've seen. Him In total, seventy films from the year and nine of them received in eight to ten or more from me, which is enough for me to consider them favorite. So it was quite tricky to which them down to just five, but I'll share those five of you very shortly. I it's so from Australia. This was an interesting topic because where it came up, I wasn't sure if wanted to discuss it or not. I think it's a bit too soon to go into two thousand and nineteen. I've seen a SINMA number of features. To Tom I've seen sixty four films, but if we go back every year from two thousand and nine to two thousand and eighteen, I've seen a hundred or more films. But I don't feel like I'm even halfway through two thousand and nineteen and already we're being asked a Colt with a best of list or what I'll be discussing today is my two favorite films of the year, as well as three films that I think maybe they not necessarily in my top five but films. I think I've been massively overlooked because of I was just going to do my top five, I'd be getting into a lot of the standard Oscar bars films are already had a lot of traction last year. I think it's interesting how people approach here is a little bit differently of the film that are Marada right now, I think I've seen essentially everything I expect will crack my top five. I'm sure more films will come out radar in the future. Totally real exception to that is Eric Powell's new film do now, the September, which unfortunately is not available yet. So I just love his person less they films. The second night was my favorite film of Two Thousand and sixteen. So that's the one film a team could crack my top five. That that's eleven seen. Does I from that? I'm really happy. Two Thousand and nineteen was quite a Sol deer, especially compared to take it as a whole. So I'm really excited to start talking about my top five films. I love all of them. I think it's interesting what Chris has said about getting through films on his radar and being quite confident with the top five or top ten for each year, because before the podcast I actually sat down and I went through my top ten lists ever since I got into films about nineteen years ago for each arm, averaging around three or four films in my top ten of films that I didn't actually see during awards season or in the month shortly afterwards. And there's actually three years among that for which my number one film was actually a film that wasn't on my rider and which I didn't see until at least twelve months after the year had ended. So I think it's interesting to speak about a year so shortly after it's is...

...ended, especially because we can compare it to how we feel about it later. I think there's value in seeing what we loved at the time and what's made its way to us and then what will be we discovered. Like Chris, they are only a few films that I haven't seen that I will have really wanted to see, like if you telling Navarella and some others that are on your list. But certainly in five, ten years times I'm sure there will be other films that I'm not even aware now. I guess I'm in the middle of Youtube. Oh, absolutely, I think my say films from Area Right now. That's what I'm referring to as well. I'm pretty sure there will be a few more surprises and discoveries coming over the next five to ten years and I'm really looking forward to our for and film festival as well, where a programmers and is look working so hard going through so many of the pure films from last four years or so and bringing them all to us, and I find new favorites there every year. So I'm sure about discover of you knew that thousnd there with there as well. And with that said, let's get into the top five lists and we can start with Clem okay, so my pick for number five film of Year is a film I won't be discussing too much because Tom also has it in his list and it is a foscar nominated them, Corpus Christie. So, like clam, I really enjoyed Corpus Christie. That's why I made it to number five on my top films two thousand and nineteen and it's a gritty character study from Poland that offers an engaging insight into the life of a reformed criminal, Daniel, who masquerades as a priest. It explores the notions of faith and deception. We need devoid of morality. It comes the most moral person in a gripping story line that inevitably leaves audiences filmly invested in Daniel's faith. The impressive central performance from Bartos Billina is what makes the film so captivating, but the direction screenplayer also exceptional, and it's no surprise the Corpus Christie was nominated for best international film at the year's Oscars. It's just a shame that it never started chance against a certain film that will be discussed in more detail later on. Yeah, I also loved Corpus Christi. I think there's just something the so well with taking such Ay Taft and flow path and forcusing in on our leads, this painful in the drug addled eyes, this strong eyes, and steers that you there is so much and more in both eyes and making it an incredibly powerful film. I don't think I love the Corpus Christie as much as you guys do. I did like it, but one thing I definitely agree on is the central performance by Bartosh B Alenia. I guess this proms he's excellent and the film really entirely relies on him. My number five is once upon a time in Hollywood. As the title indicates, it's a fairy tape taking place in the particularly key period in the history of Hollywood, one thousand nine hundred and sixty eight, with new Hollywood coming in and the counterculture taking over. Tarantino makes it simultaneously joyous and mournful, hangout film centered on two wheel movie star performances from DiCaprio and Pitts. It's about the last two remnants of an outdated system watching as the world moves on from them. But it's really also about but pitch cruising around La while listening to the radio, and there's something immensely satisfying to me about that. Maybe because Tarantino is quite obviously enjoying himself so much with this period, and if there's one thing he's good at, it's sharing that enthusiasm. Yeah, also really enjoyed once one time in Hollywood, and I really the fairy tale as well. We will actually do Gutt in the podcast some time in their future. One thing I'll bring up there too is just the way he creates what them called sand box in the man it's so interesting that it does that with a real story, with a real backdrop. In the Manson family murders. We essentially just have this braw old Hollywood world the other two let characters just driving around and hanging out in this massive sound box, with all of these things especially, but also know the story just around the corner or just to the side of it, which is really interesting. I also love once upon a time in Hollywood. It was very close to making my top five. I love what Matt says about Tarantino having full of it. It's such a playful film and you know that Tarantina is really enjoyed making it and there some excellent tension in there as well. So recommend it to anyone who I didn't court it. Yet once upon a time in Hollywood was a film that I enjoyed the vast majority of me. It fell apartwards the end with the ending that's Tarantino put some place is plot deflection. There is something very similar to what he's done before. Without me putting any spoilers and the best that I can say, and I was like yea, Tarantino is just coppying himself now. I thought it was maybe a bit of a copout ending. It was funny with what happened. I was...

...laughing a little bit, but I thought this is just very derivative of what Tarantino has also done. The other thing which underwhelmed me about once upon a time in Hollywood was Bargo Robbie's character of Sharon tide and a performance. It's really a nothing character and nothing performance. She doesn't really have any if it all scenes and there a bigger scene as I think, going and watching a movie and which she has had a role and she sits back and watch was that enjoys some puts a feet up and laughs, and I can understand that. It's sort of interesting the way that Tarantino was defying our expectations that we think it's going to be a film about sharing tartly, think it's going to be about the mats and murders and it's actually not so all. That's kind of interesting, but they're my favorite parts of the film, where the parts with lean out of the Caprio, the other parts with Brad Pitt, the Margot Robbie side the story I would have actually preferred to really maybe not even be there at all and Suder in the way the plot actually ends up going without me spoiling it too much. That I mean. I thought it was a good film. I thought it was a solid film. Pepill sign though, that I was Tarantino's best film, and I'm like, no, I wouldn't be even top five Tarantino for me. Yeah, no, I completely agree with that. And if you use the word Eva, the previous in that that's pretty much what it is. I mean in some ways it's a summary film of what this done before, is playing homemade to so many of its previous films and playing around with it. Everything as well. Let Works and it's great to see, but it does feel a bit slight. It doesn't have the power of men of his previous films. It doesn't have the high comedic edge or some of his previous films, but it's still really inventive and is still really fun and, unlike you, actually absolutely loved the ending. Had Top it was also very, very fitting, but I'm not going to go into why that is either because spoilers. Well, I do think this is slightly spot of we but I do want to respond to about the ending. Yes, he's got it before with those bastards. That's definitely true, but I think it's really what the fin is about. It's what's I mentioned when I said it's a fairy tape. It's obviously because they don't fit tap, but it's a fairy dad ending fells all. What's your fifth favorite fim of the air? But the film that I've picked for fifth is a film that did get a little bit of buzz at the time but ended up getting zero Oscar nominations, and it's a film core, just mercy. It's from Deston, Daniel Cresson, who's a direct he might not have heard of for but he directed a great film that was really big a few years ago, boord short term twelve. It was the film that had really launched Free Larsen's career and also, as a young Rammy Mellok at it are very powerful film that I would highly recommend. Just mercy isn't quite as powerful a short term twelve, but it's similar in the way that it's very focused on the characters and very focused on the performances. Without going too much on the plot, it's basically about a black man who is wrongfully convicted of murder and he's being tried in a deeply racist Alabama and a young black lawyer comes in it to defend him, and this is a film that wasn't even on my radar. I didn't know anything about her until the SAG nominations came out and Jamie Fox got a nomination for best supporting actor. And Jamie Fox has absolutely excellent and in it. It's not just your typical rondly a hues man performance. It goes to the whole gamut of emotions. Goes from disbelieve to despair to cynicism, and most of US actually spent on the cynicism part of it. A lot of it is with the young lawyer played by Michael B Jordan, is also fantastic going in telling Fox it is going to defend him, and Fox are sort of out this stage. We just doesn't care about because he thinks the whole system is rigged against him. Film does get a little bit sentimental at times, but it is so well acted and beyond Jeremy Fox and Michael B Johnie of also got some excellent work from Rob Morgan and Tim Blake Nelson's as a couple of unfairly treated prisoners. Well, maybe not necessarily one of the top five films of two thousand and nineteen. It's definitely one of the more overlooked films. Something I'll probably mentioned about just mercy is like short term twelve as bre last and in it, but it's actually really a forgettable, under developed role. Nothing appeared to the powerhouse performance that she gave in short term twelve, but still a film that I highly recommended. I saw with a few friends and they're also very impressed by it. Theres no one else has in in des Mursies, though. It's really is an overlooked film. So I'll go to thank you for bringing it there, Dente, and so of my number five is probably one of the most cinematic documentaries that I don't seen. Actually it is, of course, Honeyland, which was also nominated not just for best documentary but best in film at the Oscars. We follow Hottetza, who is an aged in beekeeper north Macedonia, living in complete...

...isolation with ailing mother. The beauty here is that, you know, there's no interviews, there's no conversations with her. The whole film is driven by her pressence and her rooments and her conversation with the people around her. For much of the film it it's actually just her alone as well, tending to her bees, doing her work, and it's time except cinematic clarity that many may not even realize its documentary. I mean you had this just beautiful scenes of her just walk into her bees, play with shadows, play with nature. is absolutely fantastic to look at. And then we actually get a stool arm complex plot as new neighbors come out of nowhere, a family struggling with money and out of desperation, turn the beekeeping as well, upsetting the entire ecosystem around her. And what is so fascinating here is that the family is consistently portrayed sympathetically, despite their actions harming had it's in so many ways. It's really worth noting that the crew fold her and her neighbors were about three years and this is also why everyone became so comfortable with the cameras and why they managed to catch so many tenderan cinematic moments and just let it and fall. And you can feel there's these countables. We can feel the drama, we can feel the UN rest between them and it's their civil war, it's called war rader between them. The emotions, despiration, everything there can be felt. So strong. It's just truly incredible work. And all right, that's all of our number five summed up. So going out their next position, number four, and starting once again with clan. My pic for number four is a film from Chinada which is called Repetoire de Villa, which is English title is Ghost Town entology. It take place in a small village in Quebec where a young man dies in a car crash and it shows how the old village, to small village, is shake it shows are a grief throughout the film. It also shows a talk that people have about the accident and how some people think it wasn't really an accident, the kind of small talk you we expect in this small village in a situation. It also shows that how much the entire village just focuses on this event throughout days and days and days, without being really able to move on. And I stop the film at an amazing atmosphere. Takes Place in winter, so there is a lot of us snow. It has this dream like impression. Also takes some kind of a fantastic treaty turnet, say in the second Alf. That really adds something to to the film. It also has some quite interesting characters. Yes, I watched this one for this episode and certainly there is a very strong sense of mood in that film and it's really the the big setting point, and it is maybe not unique. It reminded me a bit of the horror movie ground, the cold hole in English. It kind of starts like that and lay it goes into a bit of another mood later, but just this this mood is very all encompassing in the film and it really sells this idea of these small towns kind of emptying themselves and which is what's all the thing, the things all about. Yeah, I mean I feel both Ontoli Jas as well. I didn't love it, but it's really like good film. It works really well as this kind of quirky mood piece that plays around with a little bit too many ideas, like it's place, with some digital shots that are quite poor quality and everything else. It plays with dark comedy, plays a little bit bit horror, and it's its mix of horror comedy porky elbow in the film that has this very precise mood. It has a decent bit to say about this small house and taking the ghost town idea to the next level. Let's say it was certainly I really enjoyable viewing and moving on to Matia. So my number four is knives out. I'm a big fan of hood on. It's in both literature and Cinema, and this is a particularly playful entry in a genre that really benefits from the late, certifical touch and the very game casts, and this definitely has both of those. But I think what really makes the film tick for me is another armas as the moral and emotional center of the fin and then there's the did more, which strikes this ideal balance where I didn't quite figure out what was coming but I felt like I had the tools to do so. So when it came it felt quite satisfying. As well as keeping the film's clever comedic energy. I was a really big fan of knives out, or so what I thought was really great was the way the director players around with chronology in the film to...

...reveal certain details at specific times, so you're actually seeing it all in chronological order. I really like the match and it was a really great setting. there. There are some really fun supporting terms, including character actor for the s mm at Walsh, as a security man you'll still use as old vhs tapes and at old s VCR or some things that I didn't like too much about the film. I didn't like Daniel Craig to accent. That was very distracting for me, and I also thought the vomiting thing was a bit silly and whatever. But overall I was really into the film. I loved every minute of it. I know some people complain it was a bit too long, but I thought it was great and I can't wait for the sequel. I really enjoyed knows outs as well, and not quite enough for it to make my list of favorites, but I thought it was a really fun who done it? There's an excellent cast. I met you. I really thought that another arm was shown in this role. I thought she was excellent in blade running two thousand and forty nine, and it's great to see here get more where my number four film is. Sorry we missed you. By Ken Loach. Now can loach is perhaps one of the greatest British directors working today. He always combines powerful storytelling with thoughtful social commentary and is often quite distress and expersais on the working class. Sorry we missed you. As a shining example of this ethos and it takes a swipe at the illusion of self employment, of a heart felt story about a delivery driver struggling to provide for his family. This is kitchen some realism at its most, affecting with another emotionally draining tale like that. was previous film, Daniel Blake. So you missed. You can be painful to endure it times. Yet it is usterly compelling and invital cultural importance. Any film that can move me to tears is one that I was certainly be eager to recommend to those who relish emotionally involving pictures, and particularly one which comes from my native country and is therefore close to my heart on a number of levels. Oh, I also saw. Sorry we missed you. It was a film that I thought was a very emotionally charred. I thought I had excellent performances are all around, especially from the our daughter and from the leader. Just the hoarted situation that he gets himself in and that he has to keep doing this to livery job. But no matter what, it was very powerful. I thought it was equally as powerful as I Daniel Blake. That was a bit sad when it came up to awards season and didn't get the same sort of attention at the bafters and other places that I don't know Blake did, because I feel very much cut from the sign cloth and very similar effective, powerful personal dramas as can lunch has done well throughout his career, but particularly, it seems, of light. Yeah, also really enjoyed sorry, Miss Doing. Actually think it is better than I don't know, like it does has this much strong report because you see this entire family struggling with this reality. And and what can lors does so incredibly well is it can just so openly and so clearly see how this is breaking down each character. It's just this way. He Strips back all of the drama around them. Let them please get to just be a little bit more armless, and this puts them into these part and often really hard conversations, really heavy emotions, but in doest of it such clarity that it feels so incredibly strong. That's an interesting point that you mentioned about sorry. We missed you, because it affects the entire family. Every thing about sorry, mischief is the whole thing is a d drama, whereas with I Daniel Blake, I don't know, different people of talk to have got different opinions are but I thought at times, I don't know, black was sort of making fun of him a little bit, like when he's out using the computer in this public Internet cafe and he runs the now so over the computer screen. But I saw that in cinema some people laughing at it. I don't know if it was a tender at all laugh, but some parts of it did feel little bit lighthearted, where as sorry, we missed you. It is a hard hitting drama the entire way through. I think all of can lots of films have. I just most of have these lighter elements in the the little extent you can feel some of the love characters have for each other, some of the compassions they have and these kinds of humors also just to show how out of place the characters can be. But the end I can see what they mean it. It's certainly even more exhaustive and it more claustrophobic than I Daniel Blake dough. Both films do have the same feeling of especially if lead characters is being driven to the bone by bye, which every system this in. Obviously I don''t blake it was this government buducracy itself and here it is this company that's employing him. But you can just feel their agony...

...as they're coming up against this just yielding system. And this is all something that can load just done so well, particularly off late, where these systems of power that is consistently pushing and pushing and pushing and pushing on lead characters. Now this can also be a little bit too clear, a little bit too obvious in this how is communicated to us, which is why it's not the still in my top five, but it's still has so much power. So the film that I've picked for my number for was a film that came out last year. It had a little bit of awards buzz. It got ADGA nomination for Best Directional debut, but it didn't get any really big awards than the getting Oscar nominations. Film is called Queen and Slim. It's about a couple. They're going out on their first day. They're an African American couple and during their first day they get pulled over and they're pretty much forced to shoot a racist policeman in self defense and they end up going on the land and they unwittingly become folk heros and cam footage of the whole shooting incident goes viral. Trailers for the film compared it to Bondy and Clyde. There's a little bit of dialog and they're one of the characters compairs the protagonist to bodying Clyde. But what's interesting is that this we theres away from it, so it's not like these characters have chosen to do it, and a lot of the film involves the characters trying to process are. They've become folk heroes and they're not really comfortable with his status that they've managed to acquire and they find themselves in this position where they just forced to flee because the authorities are not going to believe anything that's happened to them. And the connection becomes really real and you really feel them bonding over the course of the film. But it's a bit different from bodying Clyde, even though they're perceived as a modern day bodying Clyde. Whatever the case, the film is very strongly acted by Daniel Klua, who was in get out and going to ascolimination. For that. It was also in widows and Secario. It's a little lot of strong performances of light and this is another great turn from as well as Jody Turner Smith, and it's a film that is quite funny at times. I was laughing out loud here and there, but it's also just a really powerful look at racial profiling, the difficulty is of overcoming racially charged violence, as well as our videos these days go viral, and the difficulty of trying to divorce yourself on a folk hero status if suddenly you become the celebrity because of something that you did without actually wanting to do it. So I agree that couldn't seem moves a bit away at some points from buying Claude. I do think it's always in conversation with it. especially you have even shots, like when there's a picture taken of them when they're on the hood of the car. That directly to me evokes seen in bud in Claude. I think there's a lot of the idea of we actualizing the story of bullion glade in the different context with African American people and of course, as you mentioned, with social media playing would do really a similar rule as the press does in Bonyon take and also want to mention that. Yes, I agree that Daniel Caluya is really, really good in this film. He's he's a really stand up performance for me of the year overall actually, even if that the Finn has some limitations, but he's really great in it. Very pleased to hear that you like the film. Also, Matthew and Daniel Cluya's performance is just an extremely down to earth actor and especially when you get a film like get out, which is a bit out there, it's a little bit funny and whatever, what's happening is really extreme. He always manages to be down to Earth and again queen and slim as another really great downtoearth turn from him. I think you're right about what you've the connection you've made with Queen and slim versus body and Clyde and the role the press played in bondying Clyde. Now, we're not meant to admit things like this or not going to apologize it for it, but it's been over five years since I've seen bodying Clyde. There's one of my all time favorites. Perhaps if I'd send a bit more recently, or maybe a three watch and rewatch queen and slim, I'll be able to pick up a more connections. Yeah, I just thought it was really interesting the way that the film was so happy and so interested in referencing body and Clyde, but also, like you've said, doing something else with the myth and showing how that sort of story can be applied differently in modern times. My four favorite film of the air is but create a for lady on fire, which I know it's materials favorite film of the entire year, so I'll let him present that towards the very end, and that puts us all the way up to our third choice, which will start to look at a little...

...bit more time to so, starting again in athabetical order plan, what's your third favorite film of the air? So for the third favorite film of the year, I'm giving the spot away to deer skin by content dripure. The movie is about Guy, played by Jean Jas Alda, who buys himself a quote made in their skin, obviously, and who will throughout the film become a little bit obsessed, let's say, with the quote. It checks in an hotel in a small French village and pretty much spend this time admiring his code, wearing him walking around showing it, but as a film goes on, he will need money because he has other plans in mind. I saw a film as a man wanting to escape, let's say, is life and somehow returning to nature. We don't know really much about him, but it seems to be the regular type of person who just as some kind of fun obsession, and going back to a small village and buying a new quote was for him something maybe that would break, I don't know, the monotony of his life. Regarding now the filmmaker content, you, Pew, I thought the film was a logic progression, let's say, in his filmography. I've seen almost all of his films. I think I'm just missing his first two films, but I thought it was less absurd film that is a previous one, and a little bit more structured, let's say, and easier to follow that his previous films were. And in the sense it's similar to his previous film, the one he made right before, which was opposed, which I thought was a little at the same at the time, also less absurd and more structured than is all the films. So it seems to be a logic progression for him. It still features some absurd scene. Of course we can still see that Gpeo made the film, but I was talking to a friend about it who was also a fan of depew and he said that it didn't liked his last two films, so opposed and the skin. So it would seem that you sew is changing his tyle a little bit, going maybe through more conventional films, and for some it seems that it didn't work, at least for his fans of films like reality or rubber. It works really well for me, but I can definitely stand fun of the first hour be a little bit disappointed with Puffy's taking now. So in interestingly, saw Luda and will post. Those are the only two contentutor films I've seen and those times I went well, this is not that weird, because I had heard that he was a very weird filmmaker. Right, we went a really absurd approach, and certainly it does appear that those two films are much less absurd than than previous films since from that refutation, but they're still certainly off. Guilter and Luda is certainly that way. Just skin, and I think Jean Jada is really good at playing roles of people who are kind of a thin grasp on reality and his accident here. I watched the skin this week pips free to catch up for the episode and they really enjoy it. Was Quite Quirky and intriguing, although it did feel a little slight the weird times where it felt like a film could have potentially been patter is a short film rather than a feature film. But on the whole it was a positive experience, or perhaps not as good as rob really enjoyed the rubber and I thought that there was a really good film, though well, it does feeling with light. It's just seventy seven minutes long. I feel like something more could have been built in there. I feel, like you said, it could have been a shorter film, where it can have been a slight longer film with more death. There was something that was just a little bit in especially in the relationship between Dragam and other honor. But one thing was really interesting is this idea which comes from rubber, to that you have both the action and the observation of the action, because here, of course, did Dan start filming what he's doing. This DIS startings and starts the evolving a little bit into the horror territory and and that is editing it for him, and you just have this does this in rubber. You have someone watching it and someone doing it, and it says really interesting how, all about ten years apart, he's still delving into that kind of dynamics. I really loved a deer skin. I thought it was a great film. I agree that rubber works a bit better overall, but I thought it was really good. I thought it was great that it was kept down to seventy seven minutes because I thought it...

...really got to the heart of what it was about, the whole idea of filming and editing. Like Chris has said, it's also is just really, really funny, and just the whole idea of him conversing with the deer skin and the deer skin asking him to buy more disk in. There's some hilarious parts and they're like one way he films these people whatever saying that they'll never wear a jacket again and they throw it in the boom of his car and he's going to go to drive off whatever they like. What about our jackets? And he's like, you said you never wear a jacket again. I've caught you on film. Your fucked and he just drives off as just some hilarious parts and there about that and oh it keeps buying more deer skin stuff. He basically, without spoiling it too much, pretty much becomes a dear himself by the end of the film, and I don't want to give away the ending, but the ending is absolutely pitch perfect in that regard. Atly here into that metaphor, and I think Adele Hannel who's an actress who I've loved ever since two thousand and two when I saw in a film called the devil's where she's fantastic. I thought she was really good also, and it's a character seems so straightforward at first. As the movie of progress is along, she becomes more and more complex and we first realize who she is. So I thoroughly enjoyed it. It would have been a different film as a short film, but I thought it's seventy, seven or eighty minutes long. I thought it feeled its purpose really well. It's not all said that the completely agree. These parterre absolutely hilarious, especially the meat, the elements where he films these people playing these roles and which is also half of the film start and it this is grasp when reality, thinking of him filming them, saying that they are rare. Called again, if the binding legal contract is just just his grasp, when reality, the way he speaks to those skin, the way that he becomes in there, as it say, it's just it's it's great to watch Mandy with three is parasites, which is how you're on someone else's list. So I just have to infiltrate their fancy list later. My number three film is more on us, and this is a vibrant and arresting picture from Columbian Director Alexandro Landrus that tells a gripping tail of a unit of child soldiers who are tasked with guarding a hostage high up on a mountaintop. Providing young and impressionable minds with weapons is a dangerous move, as we see when the power goes their heads and the group suffer from in fighting. Although the subject matter is vastly different in these two films, monaster providing me with a similar experience to that of watching American honey. Both films take a look at disaffected youth sharing together in an unconventional situation that vars from moments of sheer jubilation to ear shattering devastation, and they both have many breath taken shots of nature along the way. Apart from actor Moses Arius, who played the memorable quirker character of Basio in the kings of summer, the group of young actors are mostly inexperience, but they deliver it impressively natural performances in what will have been a grueling on location shoot. beforeboding soundtrack is a dreading, fused exercise intension. As the deep rumbling makes way for tribal lightbeats and the unit relocate to a dense tropical forest, the inevitable descent into savagery side steps most of the usual cliches as the collective fight for supremacy in this provocative picture that pits them against each other and the dangerous environments that they dwell in. It is never made clear where the action takes place or even what ear of the film is setting, but this hauntingly beautiful film is undoubtedly a stark allegory for Columbia as recent tumultuous history and harsh reality of guerrilla warfare during civil war. It uses the blueprint of the Lord of the flies to great effect or showing in a bold and dazzling spin on the classic novel to create an unforgettable, almost transcendent cinematic experience that marks landers is a director to watch out for in the future. They also really enjoyed more morth. I think my only issue with it was a little bit terms of the atmosphere house presented in that I didn't know if it was going for a realistic vibe or a real vibe. It seemed to take place in this kind of in between lad you have some elements that are slightly more to real, slightly more fantastical, slightly more central than you also have some more realistic elements there as well. But this this experience in these characters out in the building has experience and logic between them and relationships. And there's the cinema as a whole. But it was really great. Minos was actually the last thing I saw in theaters before confinement. I really like this beginning of the film, this very unique atmosphere. I mean literally atmosphere. They're very high in the mountains. I thought that was very intriguing. Maybe I was a little disappointed by way twins, as a lot of the flies story, which maybe I thought it would maybe get more...

...into the politic critical situation in South America and how that relates to, you know, the people hiding in a jungle and re begions there. Anyway, perhaps did not love where the thing went in the end, but certainly I found it visually quite arresting and I'm curious to see where this to make a goose from there. It's interesting. Again, on the covid topic, I was got to mention it before and I forgotten. I think one of the reasons why Queen and slim hold such a special place in my heart is it was actually the last film that I saw before the cinemas closed for covid and I was there with a cover of other people and it was almost empty and we discussing with the people were selling the tickets there about our rage. It's got to be like during covid and we never thought the cinemas would actually close. Yeah, it was kind of special in that sort of way. So I think it's time for me to discuss my third favorite or, as I said before, the film I've picked US my number three because I purposely avoided mentioning a few Oscar bars films at order got plenty of attention. This is a film that actually got one single Oscar nomination, so it wasn't completely ignored. I would have personally liked to have seen it recognized a more categories. So the film is Richard Jeweled, which is the latest film by Clint East Water. In a summary, the film is about it's based on a true story and what happens is that Short on leads, upon investigating a bombing, the FBI turn their attention to the security guard who found the package in the first place. All a while to Houserup. It is really well as the protagonist is a security guard. He's a cop worshiper. He blindly assist the FBI agents under the assumption that they're just doing their jobs. And Sam Rockwell is also superb as his passionate lawyer basically is only friend who comes in to defend him and try and say well, you shouldn't really be trusting the FBI. Now, the film does have quite large canvas at it, so some things left a bit murky. But actually kind of like that. But we don't know about the FBI and cleans were doesn't make it clear they intentionally built up a false case against him, or did the accidentally happened? Did they or sort of put things to place and it's sort of seemed to point towards him? Or did they really need to have a target, they really need to solve it and therefore they threw him under the bus? It's all left completely murky. But what's really great about it is that it shows the power of the FBI. It shows how intimid and they are on they try and get him to sign confessions and to declare that he's done things even though he hasn't done them, by telling him he's just going to be playact, saying and what's really interesting about it is the main character. He's not just your average train person. Is someone who constantly puts himself in the wrong position, a constantly just to dig further and further. And even though Sam Rock will keeps telling him, don't talk to the reporter his boat, talked to the FBI, don't tell them anything, he just can't see that. He sees himself as this up he wants to be a cop. Is Always wanted to be a cop and therefore he just has this gigantic trust and the law and the film just tack with some really interesting things in that regard. And what's also really dynamic about the film is that towards the end houses character actually disappears into the backdrop. It becomes more about Sam Rockwell, it becomes more about Olivia wild as a ruthless reporter and the poor waterhouse a character becomes the supporting character. It becomes a supporting character in his own story, just like it was from in real life. He was initially this hero. It found the package and then he was vilified. So in the same sort of way can eastwood makes them Lesser Britagonist by the end to show how it ended up not being quite his heroic story that he thought it would be at first. And Eastwood has, throughout his directing career, directed lots of really solid movies. Many of his films like unforgiven, let us from Ewidjima Ist River Arem on my all time favorites and I would say that Richard Rule is probably the best film that I've seen from him, and it's probably two thousand and eight when he did grand arena. I might just clarify that Richard Rule is an an enjoyable film. It's a little difficult to watch at times. As you see, the FBI really putting him into a corner. But it's just a really powerful film really well. That said, I know Cathy by it's got an Oscar nomination for it. Or while a houser is really at also add Sam Rock. Well, it just keeps going from strength to strength. Lightly ever since three billboards and the most interesting performance, and vice also to another film that I'm going to discussed later on. It's just an amazing actor. I...

...love him in Moone. It's just been doing such incredible stuff. Lightly tree is Roy Anderson's about endlessness, and just have to start by saying that they know I just love Anderson's living to the tree and that a page and set in the branch, reflecting on existence. It's actually my favorite film of the last decade. The only thing that really speaks against about endlessness, except that it's just way to them short, is that it really could just have been the fourth installment or even the epilog to the trilogy. There that timmilar. Not over the last four films, this included and there'son, has developed this unique way of creating existential horror comedies. It just finding tragedy and comedy in the Hyper Mundane and colting. In this you to the motion and bare and sometimes even fantastic or scenarios. Once again we are presented with this, this series of big nets and a large gallery of characters and situations, some repeated, but most are not. And I think if you haven't seen a Roy Andersonson before, what's especially beautiful wonderful is that each and every single one of his scenes, it's bignets, are carried out in one complete dot. And this is also what ties in with the querky off beach humor. Is just this extreme focus on details, everything always covered in one single shot. There's so many dimensions, you can have so many characters, so many events happening in the same team in the same shot. As it drags out and drags out and drags out. The main difference from the trilogy is probably the fact if it this time have an omnipresent narrator and she will present each scene or conclude every scene with this this solemn observation which we will start with. I saw a man, or I saw a woman or I saw a middle manager, and these sentences will almost always just end with a general fact, like I saw a woman who had a problem with her shoe. I saw a man who had walked into the wrong bar or sometimes, more poignantly, something as I saw a young man who had yet to fall in love or find love or something similar. And it's just this rag shaped, beautiful comedy, Semi Surreal elements here that just goes through every single one, including this repeated character of a past or, priest who has lost his faith and is yelling, screaming about his lack of faith and trying to find some kind of pollution to this, including a scene which is a fantastical both we see him drinking in his office, is consuming alcohol and sitting there in mystery and then walking through the door and starting his sermon. And that's again because all in one singular shot with so much intensity, it is truly a film about endlessness. You can feeling and the narrator. They're picking these exact teams and you feeling the narrator picking these exact scenes. It is showcases does these mundane specific events in human history and again, sometimes fantastical and something's in Pirvotal moments, like Hitler in his bunker. It taxes this one singular emotion. I don't think it cuts as sharp play as picture, but if you love Anderson's work you will love this and the filmmaking and existential humor at the muse emotions just a dark the light, as always. I also thought about endlessness. Was Excellent. I didn't want it to finish. It felt like, I could have said there for seven hours watching this film. It was just brilliant. The static shots actually capture so much. There's always so much going on in the background and so much to read into. Even though I am color blind, I can still really appreciate the vivid color pellettes that understend uses its films. This is no different. I think it was a beautiful film and it was very close to being considered in my top five films of the year. After our second favorite film of the year, starting once again with clam so, the runner up of two thousand and nineteen for me is the film by James Gray called Ad Astra. It features Brad Pitt, who plays an astronaut WHO's searching for his father in space, who's been in a space craft around Saturn, I believe, trying to find alien life. When I say that he's searching for his father, I guess it's also searching for himself, asking questions about his life is worth. His father left him and his mother to pursue his dream of finding life in space, and it seems that the character played...

...by a Brad Pitt is a bit like him and doesn't really want to be like him anymore. He also has a wife that he doesn't really see that much. He's also in space much of his life. It's something that is very natural for him, so natural that even when something quite dangerous happened to him in the beginning of the film, it doesn't seem to be reacting that much and I thought it was a very, very beautiful film to look at. So the film filled with a great ideas. I love the idea, for example, of the moon being colonized and having this kind of super markets on it and having pirates fighting for or natural resources. Seems like humans just can't learn and no matter where they go, they always end messing up where they're going to. Use of music was absolutely perfect for me. It was not too present but and very atmospheric, very fitting with the images that were presented on the screen. Not You know, in your face type of music, but very smooth and shooting. It reminded me of two films which of you refeatures this type, of men in space having existential crisis, say, which are interstellar and gravity. I should Alstra was better than the two of them. It's also a bit slower than the two of them. What slow for early would standard. So it's not that slow compared to a lot of other filmmakers, but fully would standard. It's a film that I guess could be considered a bit slow. It really gives time to think, to see the type of emotions bread bit is going through in the film, this feeling of loneliness that is experiencing throughout the film. Now, I'm not very familiar with the work of James Grade. This is my first film from him, but it seems like he is the type of filmmaker who likes to make film focusing on the family themes. So I guess this film was compared a lot to his previous film, velocity of that, which I haven't seen, so I won't be able to talk about it, but it seems like it's a different perspective on the same story, which I thought was quite interesting. So yeah, overall I think it's a amazing film, very atmospheric in a way which leaves a lot of time, I'm for thinking and yeah, just a very interesting film to see in Hollywood nowadays. I am a sucker for space movies. Any film saying out to space, where people are exploring kind of unknown territory. At Astra follows in the footsteps of some great films and for me it doesn't quite match their brilliant but there were some excellent ideas in there nonetheless. I really enjoyed the scenes on the moon, as kind mentioned, particularly chase scene, and there was an encounter in a spaceship that they meet on the way that I thought was really original. So lots of loving at Astri but not quite enough for me to consider amongst my own personal favorites. Well, a little bit interesting for me is that, out of the three reason Holly Wood Sci fi films that are kind of trying to be either two thousand and one or Philly Arius, the other two obviously being interstellar and or, I will this is actually my favorite of the tree, if it's very surprising because they have so much more besiden really like both lun especially. We do better than gray. But I think what two things worked really well here is what Brad pits extremely powerful performance and the stripped back way that gray tells his story, especially the emotion around him and the fact that this essentially is entire spacement is really just about Brad Pit's character finding himself. I did think that was played out a little bit too lightly, especially with the ending, which was studio forced, and there's the whole way to hire last act played out and solved. The action elements a little bit too obvious. But it was still a really, really strong, quite great and just and beautifully shot and made film. Well, I'm generally a big fan of these big space exploration movies, but I actually did not really careful a dast that much played to me as a movie that did not know what it was. It's actually two movies in one that we did did not fully measure with each other. You have this very intimate personal film about Brad Bits, about this relationship with his father, about essentially toxic mascortinity between generation right, forcing him to be very close down, and that's really interesting. That could work. It's a esthetically kind of Malichian like using this voiceover by but pitts. True, that can work. And then you have this space adventure with this big action scenes like on the moon and when he goes into the other ship, and that also works. I think those scenes individually are effective, but to me they really felt like put together without really making sense with each other. As a results, for me, the film doesn't really work. I can kind of see what you mean. They're so excitly disagree. The actual elements were some of the week is in the film, like the large shit of them just felt too obvious for a whole wood film, even though it was handled a...

...bit more somber, which therefore made them work with in this story. But what's truly works, what truly carries it, is Brad Pitt central performance and this is his character development. I also, like I said, it's almost a bit like three films in one. Like I think the three acts or stilistically and emotionally just feel completely different from each other, which it's also quite well done on against Grace Park and that the second part, the moon and the colors they use, especially in the all the booth, is just fantastic. This is so wisually beautiful, especially the use of red. I think that's just incredibly memorable tomatography. I absolutely loved at Astra. It is definitely suddenly in my top ten films that I've seen from two thousand and nineteen Brad's pit performance. I think it's performance is definitely a career best in there. It's very melancholic and it's also totally devoid of his usual charisma and it's such an intriguing performance. Series got such tied and longing eyes throughout booted narration. It's a brad pit that we've never seen on film before and I was so disappointed when all the Oscar bars went to once upon a time in Hollywood. I mean, he was good. They're definitely at Astra for me, is a career best performance for him, and the films that have been mentioned of being similar to at Astra I can't agree with. I think interstellar is a very interesting companion piece. I don't think gravity is. I know Tom Disagrees with me about this. As a big sci fi bath as somebody who loves tales about a space I actually really like the approach of at Astra compared to gravity, because Ad Astra is all about James Gray realizing that the best sci fi films about space will bask in the glorious unknowns, vast unknowns of deep space, what is actually out there, and that's what Ad Astra is about, very similar to Solaris, whether it be the George Clooney remake or even the one thousand nine hundred and seventy two original by Andre Takovsky, which is one of my favorite films. The takowsky's film is all about that vasts of space, mischise of space. Anything could happen there and, like Laris, AD Astra is also about making that connection and the whole body has to travel through in space and the big distance between himself and is farther. It's really goes into that metaphor about relationships, which is similar to what you get in, I'd say, even both versions of Solaris. I thought at Astra was a very powerful film. I like what Chris said about the colors. There are some really great interior shots and there I'll probably agree that the action parts of it will probably a little bit on the week side. I don't know if it quite left me with the same emotional punch that I would have expected. I really liked it. I thought it was a really well done sci fi them those actually about spice, actually about the mysteries of space, actually about longing and it wasn't just a nonstop roller, close to ride like alphons or corn did with gravity. That, for me, was one of my biggest disappointments of the last decade. And by comparison, AD Astra is a film that really resonated with me more than I could have ever antestipated. And I think it's worth noting that they really actually have a space exploration podcast at some point. I think you'll be so either rolls. This gets sucked into all these comparisons right now and this go off for another hour. But just been it down to the number two, picked off mature. Yes, so my number two is motherless Brooklyn. It's a neon noir who and through, complete with private detectives doggy pursuing leads they really shouldn't corruption at the very top, shadows in doorways and thugs in back streets and new and whiles. They're all about mood, that melancholy of people dialing with a terrible, uncarving world and desperately trying to make some sort of remark on it or to find connection with others. And what really elevates this film for me within the Genre is Daniel Pemberton's score, because the story is about New York in the S. it's steeped in the music of that time in place, which means jazz in various forms. But in this case it's a very mye Davis inspired score and I just love it. It's not just that I like how it sounds either. It serves a your purpose within the the story, because the plot is all about the wheels of progress, in this case infrastructure, crushing cultural and social diversity, and the music that is only present in the film, even there's a scene in bar where you just listen to the music physically for three minutes, is a result of that cultural context. So this film's mood is all about longing for something better and that is also what drives the characters, especially Edward Norton as the protagonist. And it's this very noir theme of is...

...it even worth trying or is it all just pointless? And I think it manages to feel very relevant while playing firmly within the confines of this very established genre. I really liked all the performances, even Bruce. Really this is good, which basically hasn't happened since when was kingdom. I think, and especially Alec Baldwin as this looming villainous figure inspired by the Real Life Guy What Moses was a New York politician. Obviously, Boldwin playing someone involved in New York real estate is going to evoke other things, but I don't think the film makes the mistake of leaning too much on that, or at already his character is much more interesting than taking shots at trump would be. But again, really the big thing that makes the film work is this strong sense of mood that makes all these noir machinations flow with each other very well. I number one and number two film both the only nine native ten films I've watched this year, and on any given day he could perhaps swap places, but I'm sticking with what I went for originally, and my number two of the year is midsummer. Now, from the traumatic opening sequences of midsummer it's clear that you're entering another vivid and unsettling nightmare from director are ASTA. Like in hereditary as to explores the grieving process and the breakdown of relationships, anchoring his disturbing films of a display of raw human emotions, as he coaxes passionate performances from his cast as putting through the ring with a macabre and twisted tape on the horror genre. After the ominous introduction, summer transports such to the seemingly lush and enchanting Swedish countryside, where a group of friends take part in the traditional festival at an isolated commune. It is here where we witness one of the most beautiful, it's also most depraved, horror films of recent memory come to life in a beguiling visual feast with Sumptuous Cinematography that puts you under hypnotic spell. Those expecting a conventional horror film, like to my friends were when we saw in the cinema, I likely to come away disappointed. This is horror mask reading as high art. The focus primarily on establishing and unsettling atmosphere rather than jump scares, and the meticulous attention to detail throughout provides those who return to the free with Mor to digest and repeat viewing. Many audience members were visibly frustrated by the grueling run time. I was delighted when the three hours director calls announced and, although I rarely re watch films soon after my fish fearing, I can't wait it out. Right back into midsumer when it was released on blue right the obvious and crass comparison to the wickhamn. It's misleading. Yes, this is folk horor. The treads a similar path, but I supports his own stamp on the socialenre incorporating the best ideas from the films that have clearly influenced him to deliver refresh and original spin on this disturbing tail of a sinister cult. What really struck me with midsummer was something that I really paid that much attention to, namely the tound editing and the way the muted sound go so well along with the photography to create an atmosphere of doom from the very beginning. The muted music, height and clinking of keys and other sound effects. It just sets us into that right mood, right the way that you have all of these clues that something will go wrong at this is a horror movie long before there ever is a single actual hint within the plot. And, like don't just said, this is the film which slowly builds atmosphere and tension and is quite long for a horror film. The directors cut is almost three hours long and it takes almost half an hour. I believe until they even get to location where they will be celebrating midsummer and meeting the supposed cult and throughout this entire time is still feel the atmosphere of an ease, and that's just an incredible accomplishment. I quite enjoyed the Mitsomer. I'm really intrigued about the director Scots, because I saw it in theaters and I can certainly see how the man longer cut would be even more immersive and even more oppressive in a sense, which is really key to what happens with from sperious character and how oppressive her environment is and how oppressive the new environment is for the other people around her, but maybe not too much for her. I also have a very distinct memory of seeing this whom in theaters, and there's one scene, let's say it's involves sex, which created a very strong reaction from the public everyone, basically last which I found interesting because often you don't have that kind of scene, very often in horror movies, where the laughter it's a very serious movie, but the loft is very much intended. I think it's laughter of being uncomfortable and I thought that was a very memorable scene. I think first noting that in Sweden, which the blood...

...is said, that most people consider it a comedy or a black comedy, and being, for normal understanding, Swedish, I felt the same way. As well as that, there's it is a very serious, slow mood piece, but there's this dark comedy throughout the entire thing which makes it incredibly enjoyable. I completely agree with that point of view, Chris, because whilst it is a horror film, and there's no doubt that it is horrified, I was sat there watching it with a big Quin on my face for most of it. There's a lot of black comedy in their dark humor and it's a very twisted tale, but one that I've fully enjoyed. And I also forgot to mention how brilliant Florence Pew is in her role as the main protagonists. It's kind of strange that she got an Oscar nomination for little women, considering how powerful her performance was in Midsommer, because I would have presumed that this would have been the one that would have gone into more attention. It's like that. Somewhat of the Calam of the actually comes from two things. You have. One does the mute the motion of these often self centered characters and to these culture glass do you see? This keeps his musings on this culture class and people trying to, you know, understand each other, even though obviously there's this horror element there. So much of it just comes off as so bad now, which works so incredibly well. Yes, exactly, like you said, put the Ryth in my face, midsummer. Wow, I don't know if I can express how much of a disappointment the film was for me. I went into it with, I guess, very high expectations for a number of reasons. I really like Lawrence pure a lot. In Lady Backbirth, I thought shows excellent in that there was also the fact that it was a film about cults, and I really like films about cops, especially horror films, like a film called the endless which came out a couple of years ago, so I knew that. Other thing is that the trailer had made it very clear that the film was going to be at least a bit of a homage, if not something which entirely references, the wickhamn and the Wickham man is one of my favorite horror films of all time and I've seen three or four times, at least over the years. I went in with all these expectations. I suppose was most disappointing for me is the film wasn't just a wickhamn tribute. I thought the film, and aren't want to spoil anything, but the way that things go towards the end, I thought that Ariasta was directly inviting comparisons between the Wickham Outa midsummer, just the way things go down. It's so similar. And yet what made the Wickhaman so haunting is our simple. The motives were, I'll Simbil the solution was and how the protagonist there tragically overlooks the obvious. I didn't get any of that with midsummer. I did see the theatrical version. I saw where it came out in CINDAMAS and August because, like I said, high expectations and wait to see it. Maybe it plays better than the three hour cuts and the shorter version. There's a lot of things happening which fell into the weird for sake of it bracket for me and unfortunately, with it being a year since I've seen it, I can't quite record all of it off hand. I just was expecting a lot more for it, for a film about a cult or a film that had the wickhamn there as a template and I thought rather than ending on a bang, it sort of ended on a it of a heart for me. I did like bits of pieces of it. I did like Florence first performance. I did like some of the relationship at Sarget family themes and there was interesting setting. Was Great. Also, I love those upside down shot so it was really well done. I don't agree that it was a well doned film, but yeah, I can't convey how underwhelming it was for me to sit down and watch it, although that said, I wasn't a big fan of her own tree either, which was another film which I thought was a lot of being for the sake of it towards the end. So I guess I was entirely supported because I guess I knew that I reasked or disappointed me once. I'm sorry, guys. That's so. I think it's also a little bit more noting that most of the things that they are weird are actually from north metology and noise auditions. So if it can to even be the other if you're not familiar with it, but most of the things that happen are are actually tied to things that either word Honora, believe to be done in all days of North tiganism. I can certainly see why I'm mid some it doesn't work for everyone. To verry out their film quite unconventional, and I can see why it splits audiences. But I think that's what makes it so interesting, because it opens it up to different conversations and interpretations like this, and it's fascinating to hear why a film can work so well for some people put not so well for others. Also does in thing that none of the mentioned, one of the main things to feel this so...

...well yet, which is that it is a horror fim that thinks days almost entirely during the day and builds up so much pension and these in incredibly light environments. So for my top two films in this podcast, I decided, unlike with my other three, that I will go with films that not only one nominated, but one Oscars, because I did feel really strongly about them. And my number two as a film that I like to laugh and I was so happy when I ka Waititi ended up winning the best adapted screenplay for it. Oh, the film is, of course, Jojo Rabbit. Oh, just trying to sum it up. Taking the very serious topics of the Hitler Youth and hiding of Jews in Nazi Germany, Tay Koa td gets a delicate balance between comedy and drama. Oh fantastically right here are the overthetop propaganda, over enthusiastic Nazis and the Hitler imaginary friend generate some laughs. The film also explores the mindset or what it's like to be a young person indoctrinate in depth, as well as the other people around him, I thought. In terms of the performances, I thought Sam Rockwell, who I really liked. Richard Jewel was even better. was a very effective as a gun host soldier in Jojo Rabbit, who gradually realizes that there's actually more to the nats and moving the what it seems. And the character revolves so well throughout the film. He starts off so gung Ho and then, without spoiling it too much, he sort of defiles our expectations throughout the film. Is that being a really complex character. I thought everybody could learn of the film was in very strong form, especially Roman Griffin Davis. We managed to get a go on a globe nomination for it. What I thought was really great about and especially with Davis as performance, is that it's all about this young boy who thinks he's an art seem throughout the course of the film he comes to realize that, well, he's not. For me, it's a film about personal identity and about how we identify ourselves and it's about him sort of reassessing how he sees himself. is grown up in doctorate as this Jew hating young German and brought a few different things throughout the film becomes too as well, no, I'm not, I'm my own person. It also gets into some really complex relationship stuff with a Jewish girl who's being hidden. I don't want to spoil it too much, but it takes it to some really interesting levels. There's some really interesting manipulation which you might not be expect to get a film like this, but I thought it was really engaging with its me that take. It's a bit of a two thousand and twenty hindsight look at the madness of the ut see times what it might have been like to grow up in the era. And a lot of people didn't like the film and some people found a defensive including my mom. She didn't think it was a very good taste. But you know, I lost relatives during the Holocaust and it's not initial that I'd like to be made light of. But I don't think a t t makes light of it. I think he hits some really sharp satirical targets. Their film does not glorify Hitler in any way. These are very goofy. Imagine the best friend and is out balling it too much. The film is basically about the Ideavis character realize, oh well, Hitler isn't my aunt, isn't my best friends. So but the film did a really good job and, as I said earlier on just that balance between comedy and drama. I thought it was hit so perfectly. It was a really powerful film and I left the theory going wow, I've seen a really great movie. I think it was really good at all. Focus on how I think it didn't actually play Hitler, but a child's perception of him just as his bubbly best friendly. Have this one scene which I love. Her you see Hitler's face and on the polster that show looks at him and in it's is imagining friends a completely different face, completely different features and it's really just explore, like you said, indoctrination bit, and it does it in such a really fascinating way. It's just like from the perspective of a child, which just puts us so totally invested in this extreme and horrifying worldview which just to him seems like reality, that sensible. And somethings they can so much too hot, and that's obviously the film doesn't take his side either. It's funny but also unnerving because of his views. There's just this really complex line. I I did the study thought incredibly well. I thought Jojo Rabbit was okay and but it didn't really blow me away in the same sense that it did for soul. It felt like my t t was kind of channeling wes Anderson and for me it didn't quite work. I am a huge fan of his, ever, what tecs were, particularly what we do in the shadows and boys.

Thought this one just felt like a missed opportunity for me. It's an interesting comparison that you make, Tom Because I'm actually not a big fan of where's Anderson. I mean as an artist, I sort of respect his vision. It's very interesting, I guess. How is films have a lot of symmetry in there. How they often book ended in creative ways, but other than moonrise kingdom, there's no where's Addison film that I would say is a favorite of mine. Most of them come in the excessively acclaimed book. For me, I found with a lot of whiz Anderson films it's like running a race. I feel it exhausted after watching it, like something's constantly happening in the ground bud of post hotel, something's copped. The constantly happening in all of dogs. The characters are giving no space to breathe. The just these gigantic caricatures or always running all over the place, whereas in Joe Joe Rabbit, you actually really get under the main character to see in you really start to feel for the boy, you start to say things from his perspective and just some the complex stuff that comes up with him. And they are Jewish girl that gets here just takes things and a completely different area. It's extremely character base, it's extremely personal identity based, which is the complete whole opposite from the show approach that I tend to expect I sit down to watch where's Anderson Film. Said, the point is likely that the kind of agree, at least in the shellow level, that the rabbit has some similarities to at least dressing them and the comedy around the shield and some of the quirky humor, but in terms of the actual style they're just miles miles apart. Right jog a rabbit did not really work for me. I think take away it is going for something that has a very high ceiling, high degree of difficulty, which is to make essentially a comedy satire about Nazism, and I don't think in the end I find that the film has really much to say about NAS natism. I think a good example of that would be the some, work, work character. He's fine, but to something about the character, which I guess I want to say, but it's highlights something that gets talked about to little less with Nazism than the Holocaust. And what does the film do with that? Not Anything really. I just don't to me the film feels the bits pointless. It's very cute, but I did not seem much more than that's in it and given the use of this I cannotheree. Maybe I expected a little more. That's a very interesting takee matthew, because I absolutely loved the Sam Rockwell character and I thought he was really well developed. Chris has said that I have to avoid spoilers as much as possible and discussing the film, All I can say is that Sam Rockwell character comes out as this gung Ho character, is really pro Nazism. Think he's really, you know, for the Nazi Party and everything. And yet as the film progress there's things changed slightly and I can't reveal too much of it, but some of the stuff that he does it's all through looks and stairs. There's no I log involved. It's Sam rockweld challenging it through his facial expressions for how he looks at certain characters, and you start to read more into it. But I like about the film is that it doesn't just show art sis as these two dimensional or one dimensional characters and actually shows them, not just the Hitler youth, that Nazis themselves as having little bit of death. And look at somebody who's lost Fama during the Holocaust. I might be the last person I want to see Nazis explored in depth. I really think that with all human beings, they are human beings and the other the layers to it and I thought, ty A, we're tea to get a great job unpacking that and I thought the film was all about our artziasm. Can get written off so easily, but all these people, Nazis, and also the kids and the Hitler youth, all human beings underneath, will caught up in this crazy time and the film's all about is about this crazy time. It's absolutely insane to think that as recently as eighty years ago all this stuff was going on and think that as a human society we've come beyond that. And yet all the stuff was going on there was absolutely insane. I think the comedy mode was a fantastic motive getting that across and, like Chris said before, it or about seeing it from the kids point of view, from his point of view. That's why Hitler was so goofy and everything. So I don't know, I just absolutely loved it and I just think it's a real shame of the film was perceived so much backlash recently. Just to be clear, I don't think there's any inherent problem with making a comedy in that setting. I just don't think the film does enough with it. For me, it's also gets...

...into its people of mind which is inaccurate languages. A lot of films do it. Of course it's and they are great films that do it, but it's always annoys me. Just basically you are starting with an issue right when you have these characters who are German, who are speaking English. It's just never really justified for me. That's maybe another issue and took it out, one unique to this film. Okay, I can't defend the languages thing. I mean, you've got a point with that, but you know, I don't know under that great on accents, but I think the accents are at least mostly on the mark. Compared to something like Amadius and of Chris's favorite films to discuss with, the accents are a bit all over the place. But Yeah, look, I've never really been one to worry too much about languages or accents. I don't know, I understand that. Joe Rabbit, you're not alone, Matthew. A lot of people the film didn't work for, but for me it was fantastic and I thought it had loads to say. But then again, I'm really big into personal identity films. It's one of my favorite themes in cinema. I'm also really big in films that I've got very authentic child performances. I work with children all the time and a lot of films done a very good, sharp performances. The one one can do one so well and also try a child's sense of the film so well. I really get heavily invested in whatever is shown to me. So yeah, I don't know, the film was really impressive for me. Well, we completely so. On schild performances are really great and it's incredible to manage to at the same time these. So it's Sarre and stylized and absurdly funny again, like some people point up, almost little bit like I'm a sadders and comedy. But then you also have this much deeper, more serious layer where his entire reality is confronted and there's a shildlike way he confronts this propaganma he's taken to heart and it's one of an Altim this film, to which is does that. There are so many great performances in it, which is not that common for our comedy that tries to be as they outlandish as this. But mean, Scarlett, you has this fantastic as the mother, rather dimensioned Sam rock will. He has so much presence there and the Steven Merchant Tamio is probably one of the familiest scenes of the hair as well. Just on the performance as are. Also give a shout out to Thomas and Mackenzie, who plays the Jewish girl. I thought she had a challenging role to play in there, trying to sort of, you know, she captures and reenacts some of the stereotypes that boys have grown up and hit the youth have been told about Jews and also as a really beating human heart behind that. I think she's a really great upandcoming actress and I thought she was great. Sam Rockwell was great. I'm Christmas Davis was great. Scout Hanson was fantastic. Had some great scenes where she's buying the boys father or sort of acting out as a voice father. Then he performance actually just supported me. Was Tyker watty himself a skipler. I was expecting a little bit more of that, but otherwise I great, very strong ensemble cast. My second favorite film is Martin Eden, which is the latest film by Pietro macello, and to void spoilers as much as possible, I really want to talk about the unique and simultaneously immersive and distancing style he has created. The callers are just ever so slightly saturated, the contrast is slightly stronger and there's this kind of play on light and the quality of the print that makes it seem lightly washed out, slightly less real, a little bit more like a painting with a bit of an edge, like you don't even blink when he mixes in documentary footage and stock footage from the period, in from the rise of fascism, if you'll, either all nor out of place. I mean this is a style that Marcello has been expanding ever since the wolf smileth from two thousand and nine, which, by the way, I think it's all the newest films of the cite and sound top the fifty, and he takes it so much further in this work. I mean it's just the atmosphere he creates, which has both the sense of a deep character study and a careful portrayed or which has got classic story. But the same time you get this kind of Tina man, this kind of color, using this kind of structure that would remind you almost bit more of an essay film like I don't mention the most realistic on the current Rooky but you really get the sense, you can even feel like this kind of references or comparisons to mid career good art in terms of just extreme colors, like full on red backgrounds at times. That and it all ties into this just one great pimple story of a poor working class man who dreams of becoming a writer and its potentionally trains himself to become an intellectual, that he reads all this great literature and he has to this goal of improving...

...himself, and there's just so many contradictions. Are that are really interesting in that he, in his literature, drives to portray these dark and bleak worlds of the working class and that he strikes up these contrasting relationships both with the socialist movement and with upper classes, and that he really rejects the former in favor of his view of individualism. He wants a better world for people, but the least only possible if people just engage in their own individual needs, consistently rejecting the collected, including collectively working together to improve each other's conditions. And it does follows his path to becoming this fantastical individual, just becoming individualism itself. What were so well again, here with style and this portrayal of this is that it puts us at a slight distance from the character. We can have tess him better, we can understand you're studying him and studying his acts and behavior and his beliefs. To the point and to the extent that it actually gets away with without spoiling anything, it's up the really fantastical and bizarre ending, which just works so well as a metaphor. And I think it's really worth noting also that this is actually that the pan of ajut London novel, only with the plot moved to Italy. And I think it's also worth noting that after he had released this book London, was really saddened by the fact that so many people for it as this, shall we say, Homart individualism, not understanding that it was a satire, not understanding that this was essentially talkasing just how protests and how destructive the pursuit of your own virtuality, in your own selfish and will lead you. And due to the way this film is made and presented, I don't think audiences will be similarly confused here. I so much in a done this week for this podcast and I definitely agree with the Chris about the style. It is a gorgeous Sim really, especially the way she uses natural lights in the first half. It's just amazing. And I was not familiar at all with the Jacque London novel and I think the film retains an ambiguity about whether or not individualism or socialism are these great ideologies. I think kind of ends up maybe rejecting both. We as London was definitely a socialist. I was surprised actually that it was that came from a Jack London novel, because it felt very much in Italian. especially it reminded me of the NATO Beta Bucci's film. He made a revolutuny that's before the revolution, which has similarly these characters who get into very intellectual ideas and think about the evolution, think about how to change the world and in the end it kind of poisons their lives. And that's kind of issue of you need to elevate yourself through education, through literature, but also not that it's consume you. Is an idea that I feel is pretty present in its I in Ceima in general, and so it really fits within this legacy Martin. He didn't didn't make as big an impression on me, as it did for Chris and Matthia. I can certainly appreciate the stylistic qualities of the film. There were certain shots where we were taken back to Martin's youth and go to experiences, his memories, and they were incredible. The initial romance starts, the story was certainly engaging, but as it became more and more about politics, as the film progressed, I kind of found myself losing interest and it didn't particularly grab me in that area, but it certainly one that's worth checking out. I also want to mention that Luca might an Eli, who plays Martin even is absolutely fantastic in this world like it is, the range of emotion and the complexity of the character it does. He cares it so well, to the point that, you know, I discussing the field with talents, they will actually focus on him more than the director and the type of style its presents. But the over me it was definitely style and the visual poetry, and I just can't wait to see what else Pietro Marcelo will be able to do in the future, because I think he is one of the most intriguing and most unique visual directors working right now, and if you haven't seen the bull smilet, I would also really recommended this. Just seventy minutes long. It's more to mixture with documentary, but it works with exact same style in the parhaps even more poetic way. So I the I really look forward to see what my sellabile do with this in the future. And with that we are finally up to our number one favorite films of two thousand and nineteen, and once again we'll started automatically with clam so my personal...

...pick for the best film of Two Thousand and nineteen is a film I actree so very recently, just two three days ago, preparing for this podcasts, and it is the second film from Robert Eggers, which is called the lighthouse. PROBOT figure is the director who made the which a new England for the tale about a few years ago, which the film that I really loved as well. I was really interested in a checking out this film because it usually it features elements that usually like in films shot in black and white. It features isolation, it has two main protagonist trended alone and slowly going insane, from what I from what I understood. So I was really interested in a checking it out. The film is about this. To Lighthouse keepers. One is more experience, has been doing this for years and is the character that played by William Dafoe, and the other one is youngster. It is his first mission in this the character played by Robert Pattinson, the girahical roles are defined very quickly from the start. William, the folk character, will be the one attending the lighthouse during the night, while Robert Pattison character will be the one living during the day, taking care of all the cores, cleaning the houses, bringing coal and fuel to make sure the light won't go out in the lighthouse. And as the film goes on, we see them both slowly descend into madness. Well, or at least one of the two characters. It's almost psychedelic trip, let's say, filled with alcohol, the loss of time and the reality closed by isolation and the fact that no one is coming to see them at any point. The Black and white cinematography is absolutely gorgeous. I absolutely loved every second of it. Every single image you just looks absolutely amazing. The use of a light as well is also very, very good, which makes sense because you know the film is called the lighthouse. It really accentuates their dates of mind. It seems like the light is almost a character in itself, not only the light, the lighthouse of the title, but also the to light in general, because it really accentuates what the characters think and also the relationship that the two will have in the film. It's also obviously filmed with religious allegory. Shape won't go too much into details because it would be in spoiler territories, but I thought it was very well executed and lift leave us at the end of the film with quite a few questions that are not really answered, and it leaves us something to think about, which is something I really like in in films. So overall, I think it's the best looking film of two thousand and nineteen from what I've seen so far, and I just can't wait to see what Robert Eggers will come up with next, because so far I've seen only two films from image, two films, and both films are favorite. So I can't wait to see what it comes up with next. Completely really to claim that the lighthouse is one of the most beautifully shot films this year, perhaps getting quite high competition from with Lenam. It all at which there's some reason isn't done any of our lists. But yeah, I think this is the way feel that island and the nature on it. I mean it reminds me of some of the even some of the best silent films, like Finnis Terrier, with just just the same thing, with people going mad on an island and is this clashing forces and feeling the nature around them, and there's the descent in the madness, without spoiling anything here, but there's this playful, the sent in the madness that shown here and there's this clashing powerful personalities of these two brilliant performances. It's without about one of the greatest films of the air and it's on my top ten of Dar as well. I quick liked the lighthouse as well, especially within the first performance, I think to go to get back to the issue of language, Robert I goes is actually a filmmaker who cares a lot about the accurate language in his films, booth in the witch and in this he uses language of the time and William Dafoe is really having fun with it. The monologs he gets in that playing in that full time language are so fun to listen to and also, you know, very disturbing at times. I think Robert Pattinson is not white as as that T is with it. But over all I did like the movie. You're not, and I think the sound design is also worth mentioning as being very mercive, especially with that very horrorish sound of the lighthouse. Lighthouse was a film that I approach with some trepidation because I didn't like the witch, or the which, if you want to pronounce it, as much as most people did. I...

...didn't think that I'm your tailor. Joy was fantastic in it, but a lot of the film fell like a bit of a Gimmick to me, being filmed in old English. Anyway, the lighthouse was a fantastic film and I am so happy that I saw in cinemas like Queen Slim as one of the last films that I saw, but all the cinemas closed due to covid restrictions over here. And what was really great about the lighthouse is how dark most of the shots were. So of course it's shot in or by three or over aspect ratio you want to call it's not in the usual wide screen. Yet the way it was projected on screen. Sitting in cinema screen the day, I could sort of lose track where the edge of the screen was because just the very center of the frame would be lit up by counter lighter whatever, and all the rest of the darts would sort of be swallowing up the characters. I thought it was a very moody, very atmospheric I really loved how it played out as an inseparable mix of dreams, nightmares, adadasees and memories. Not sure what's ruin and what's not real. The only thing which is definitely real is the emotions of the characters. I thought William Dafoe and yes, Robert Patterson. I thought he did live up to the foe. As some really strong performances in there and, like Matthew mentioned, the sound design was a very arresting also, the whole thing did get a little bit repetitive for me towards the end. Our lots of fights and drinking sessions. What I really like was all the parts was all a bit blurring. You don't know whether it's a dream or a memory or a fantasy or was a very good, very stylish mood piece and it does make me excited to see more from edgars or as after the witch or the VICTU or whatever you want to call that left me a little bit indifferent towards his style and this want dad. What's all said there are about the slighter petitiveness and the consistent drinking and also some of the lightly more I'm not going to say Chadd but it's likely more. You even now community elements, you know, with the with with bobby vous vetera, are the reasons why, you know, this gloriously shot film and it's Glorious Laft and film didn't quite make it into my top five. But despite all of that it's such a powerful experiences, these two actors facing off with such intensity and it's just so an incredibly powerful it's probably all the most powerful films and it is way of that they can risk man power of the actors that I have seen all year. For sure, like everyone else, I really enjoyed the lighthouse. It's an incredibly striking horror film. Came close to being my number one horror the year but obviously, as you heard earlier from me, midsummer takes that spot. But the light has come very close. I agree that the two central performances are just excellent. Kind of begrodging camaraderie that these two men have and the whole setting of the lights house. It just takes us to a place where horror films don't usually visit, and it remains fascinating throughout thems, where certain shots or images of it kind of come back to haunt you days later and linger on your memory, and that, for me, is always a sign of a really good film. Man Number One is das on feel food or portrait of a lady on fire, and there's a bit of a communality with my number two, even though it might not appear obvious at first glance what sport it and what it is booking have to do with each other, because this is a film that is, for me, also defined partly by its use of music. It's only two and a half scenes really, but they are very key scenes, in part because SAMA will set them up by sticking with only diegetic music throughout the film, which, considering its place, it takes place on an isolated island in eighteen century buttany, mostly means no music at all. But it's more than just music. The film uses art in general as a way for these characters to understand the world to interact with each other beyond the usual social boundaries and, most importantly, to immortalize their experiences. The notion of holding on to inherently fleeting things, which is basically all we experience, and the various ways in which one can achieve that, is central to the film. You've got painting, of course, which is the main crux of the plot, but we also get the characters discussing the story of offers, which is all about your opposition between the immediate and the permanent, especially as it relates to the gaze, the action of looking at someone. Of course, that's what cinema is looking and retaining, interpreting and internalizing. The power that art has an affecting us in these deeply personal ways is really on full display with the two key scenes that use music and Dama also uses how these characters live these moments so intensely, because experiencing art is not an everyday thing for them as it is for us, which makes those experiences all the more try incidental for them and, as a result, so affecting for us, or at least for me. I didn't know is fantastic in the world that's a bitted. This shoots her very well, very closed off and defiance, at least at first, and no even alone is very good as well. It...

...ends up being surprisingly warm experience. That's not really what you would expect given the setting and the actual bloods, and all of that make it my favorite film of the year. It's also bit an interesting comparison with the claims that everyone that they both take place on isolated island with two main characters in some ways going thought to tell, but in a very, very different way, and that we completely gazes there are absolutely fantastic and a performances are wonderful and really just manages to capture this I'm sure if I can describe the atmosphere, the mood here, but it's just so beautifully elegant. It's so fantastically well shot. The focus on details and they get especially their eyes and their looks as these two women form a closer, close relationship, is just incredible to observe. I think you can find on the Internet things where the lighthouse takes the path similar to Potitibley on fire. I'm pretty sure that exists somewhere. Portrait of a lady on fire was a fascinating film. Did really enjoy the thought there's two central performances were excellent, but it kind of left me a bit cold. I didn't find an emotional connection and to the characters. Visually it was stunning. Most of the shops could easily be framed and it gallleries wall. There's lots of beautiful imagery that looks exactly like a beautiful painting, and the story was relatively gripping. There's just something that, I don't know, it didn't quite resonate with me. Perhaps it was this expectation, because there was a lot of buzz around it and then you shouldn't let that come into your judgment of a film, but I think I was expecting something perhaps a bit greater than they are what I saw. Moving on to my favorite film of two thousand and Nineteen, I love this because if anyone told me at the start of the year that my favorite film of two thousand and nineteen would be an Adams on the film, I would have probably laughed in their face. Is An actor that I actively avoid due to his cookie cut comedic roles that are largely in funny, but I have gradually been grown in appreciation for his more serious roles. Punch drunk love being a shining example of his capabilities up to now. Now, Samon's performance in uncut gems is nothing short of a revelation. He Brings Charismatic Jeweler Howard ratness Alife with an astonishing depth of emotion. In a phonetic thrill ride from the safety brothers, who captured rapness pursuit of the ultimate high states beat with a near shredding intensity. A synthesize, a laden electronic score pulses with bridled energy, elevating the audiences anxiety to extreme levels as it chimes with the adrenaline rushes that take hold of rap when he places a bet or when he talks way out of any number of company mines and situations that seem to escalate intoeverity as the film progresses. Just like random manipulates there is around him for his own game, the safty brothers manipulate the audience with their precise editing, and this encapsulates the hectic and frenzied lifestyle of their protagonist, a man on the brink of a precipice who's willing to risk everything he has for a chance to win big. Any film that can grab my attention so swiftly and hold it so fairmly for the entire duration, most of which was literally spent on the edge of my seat, and is, without a doubt, and incredibly potent experience. There were movements where gas felt loud in amazement and sat with my Jory Gape, hypnotized by the incredible events that were folding before my eyes. was over, I felt exhausted, exhilarated and overwhelmed. Emotion rate gradually returned to normal. It dawned upon me that I had fallen hard for an Adams on the film, and Uncut Gems might even be his greatest performance to date. Any film that prompts me to reconsider my assessment of an acting in such a profound way is undoubtedly remarkable achievement, and that's just one of many reasons why uncut gems is my favorite film of two thousand and nineteen. There's one that I agreed completely. I mean, we know that I'm thunder of Canat. We've feeded in the rain. There were me and parenture of love and even the moment stories. But in under begains, I also think is of the best performance off the year and the fact that you feel this there after his look, he's three easy mannerisms, the ways, always looking for the next score. And the fact is that constantly talking, trying to sell these different stories, this different lies, hees get caught up in his lies and his hunt and his imagined reality, in his obsessions, and you feel sympathy and sadness and pick the undervolts and all of these things in at the same time. It's just this incredible, complex, just almost unspeakable performance like you tell almost describe all of different ways standard can actually in place our emotions in just one singular scene. It' is just incredible to watch one cut. Jim's, I'm really sorry to say,...

...was such a disappointment. I can't remember when exactly, but sometime over the last couple of years I saw a really amazing film, or good time, don't know, was absolutely drenched in their where every shot was like a painting that I could frame on my warm a film with a really excellent hulsighting music score and a fantastic performance from Robin Patterson. I couldn't wait to see what these directors, the safety brothers, I'm, up with next. When I heard about uncut gems, I heard Adam Sanders doing a serious roller. I thought great. I loved him in Spanglish, I loved him in Punch Drunk Club. I know he's capable of doing such great things. I entered uncut gems with really high expectations. It took a while for it to come to Netflix Australia. I don't know why. By the time it arrived here, Adam Sam had already won the National Board of Review Award for our best act. I got in quite a lot of buzz and I sat down and watched it. I would agree that uncut jims has a really dynamite music score from composer called Daniel low pattern, if I'm pronouncing that correctly. He also did the music for the first film that the safety's brothers did, like heaven knows what. UNCUT JEBS was a film where the music was fantastic. It was far away the thing I like the most about it. So with uncut gems, I would say probably the biggest issue for it is that I found Adam Sander's character to be thoroughly unlikable. I found to be a very selfish human being. He does have his available moments, but I felt that throughout the entire film. It was bringing his misery upon himself. So even with, without spoiling at some of the stuff that happens towards the end, I didn't really feel for him any step away there because I thought this is a horrible guy. He's brought all of this upon himself. I also thought the formula of the film was very predictable. It follows basically at everything that can go wrong does go wrong, sort of passing and by the end of it some people saying they felt stressed out. I just felt I'd I was exhausted by it. Probably my biggest disappointment, though, is that absolutely love neon. I love the films of Nicholas Winding around. I like the even the count of Reeves Don Wick films because they've got such great new in there and the use of n and doesn't really come into it in uncut gems. It's filmed a different sort of style. So I did like uncut JEM's. I thought it was a good film. It does have a solid performance thereby Adam Sandler carrying it through him does have some interesting ideas there. As an overall film, it left me going. Or won't there wasn't quite you know who I was expected to be overwhelmed. I mean by the end of good time I was absolutely breathless. I couldn't catch my breath with those whole ride the supding brothers and taking me on. I was expecting that sort of journey from uncut gems also, and forever reason it didn't quite deliver it. But was interesting, though, is that after our seeing uncut gems, I was talking to my best friend, who had seen it and thought that it was a fantastic film, and he said, you know, so you extra remind me a lot of the Adam Stanley character in and cut gems. I'm like not really, and he said, yeah, we're it's like it's like this slow it is that. This is how you win the's like, so you like this with these movie challenges. You keep watching all these tons of films or whatever and deliverately picking ones it could do from more the one challenge in one on with short a leg you could fit them all. It's you sort of how that same mentality. And I'm like maybe I am sort of like that character. I don't know, I didn't see that at the time. Would be interesting to rewatch that without in mind, but I just couldn't like the Adam Sound, the character at all, completely different to Robert Patterson in good time. I really got under a skin and felt from every step of the way. Yeah, I'm sorry, Tom I was another disappointment that the film in your top five that unfortunately underwhelmed me. I suppose I had the advantage with uncod James not to have too many expectations one way or another, because I had seen good time but didn't love it, and I don't think I've seen an Adam sendra comedy. So I've got an advantage to day as well as supers. I did like it's quite a bit and I think it's one of those films that's really all about its final scene. Right. It's very much attension rising throughout the film to culminate with this this game, and I think that scene is really good and basically it makes the film work. I think sender is good and but to me it's really all about that scene. So my number one film of Two Thousand and ninety is a film that I saw in July of last year. All that I knew entering the film was...

...that it about how managed to win at the palm door, at the car film festival. So I actually went in to parasite with the blankest state of pretty much everybody out there. There are so many people who've seen it, including people that I know who aren't film buffs who see it, since it's managed with the Best Picture Oscar, and I'm sorry, I will stop talking about our Oscar buzz or leap. And I saw this before the height of its popularity, and I don't know if parasite would have the same effect on me if I watched it for the first time now, with all the hype being built up about it, about it being the number one narrative film and letter boxed and so on and so forth. But when I went to see it was only one official as listed. I check movies the can't feel Vestibal Palm Door. Anyway, parasite really blew me away and I think mostly because I had such low expectations for it. I didn't know what to really expect from it. I don't want to spoil too much of it, because it's all those films I think is best edited into with as little as possible. But if I was going to sum it up, I say that it's about how circumstances bring an affluent family at an impoverished family closer together. It's a very dark black comedy and it varies very effectively from as a hilarity to now buy any feels and suspense, even some parts which are quite sad, as it compares on contrast the two families and manages to examine class divides and the necessity of working classes to be parasites as such the wealthier classes in order to be able to survive. If the other hilarity, there are sub parts of the field. I just couldn't stop laughing. There's one part of note sounds crazy if they ever see the film, but this woman is coughing and throwing up and the father's squirted some Marto sauce onto a Napkin, holding it up but telling that it's blooder, and just the reaction his face, the reaction of the person has reacted to him. The scene ended and I couldn't stop laughing for another one or two minutes after it's I think was really embarrassing as try to control myself a film and moved on and I couldn't get over our hilarious that scene was put together. But I also liked about it was it's about the strength of the bonds between the family who stick together and support each other, and that's contrasted to the richer family who could not control the children and they are only suffocate their own children. So it's actually showing that even though they're impoverished, they've actually closer together. Are they stick together throughout the stick and thinner the ending of the film. I don't know. That part over there maybe a little bit weak for me, but the field just kept going in different directions, that unexpected things kept cropping up here and there was constant surprises for me. I wouldn't quite say that it made me laugh and cry and equal measures, but I did cry a little bit, I did laugh a lot and I have enormous respect for films that are able to make me laugh at by equal measures. If I think about my top films of two thousand and Seventeen and two thousand a dad saying, which is our three billboards, and black clansmen, those are both films that I was laughing a lot in, but I was also crying a lot in a parasite took me through the whole gamut of emotions or really making me think about class differences and what it really means to be a power site and how it's sort of necessary in society to day. And I set on somewhat the film in two words, or those has been more than two words. By two words would be it only with a bit of a colvet see reading up as little as possible. I'd imagine people not being impressed. It's a bit higher with the reputation that it's build up, but seeing in July last year before all of the bus came out, absolutely amazing experience. It's really hard to replicate. I think. Similarly to so, I had the advantage with parasite of seeing it's rather early in its life. It had one pundo already, but it was claimed, but not as a claimed this is now, obviously. I think one scene that sort of wings up is really key. I was going to bring get up, as when it's that seen with the Napkin and the features, it really shows the film's greatest strength and really the directors, Bondon, whose greater strength in general, which is total control. It's absolutely hilarious that shot, but it's also mortifying, and the whole film is like that. It's goes from one emotion to the other and really it has both at the same time and that is so different. E could to manage so difficult to for Fim to succeed in all of those different areas are differently. I agree with salt on that. And the parasite manages to do it while still being this very engaging threater and also be a commentary on class, much like knives out. But I think posite is a more humanistic film right it's it recognizes...

...the humanity in all of these characters, right the which people. They're not great, but they're mostly oblivious. That's ignorance is their biggest problem. And I'll protagonists. We are rooting for them, even though clearly they are parasites. I mean they're not the only parasites in the film, but they are. I think it's a great film just all around. It's it really deserves what it gots because it is in accessible to everyone. I think like sold I have been sold said his to world with you would be see it. I definitely agree with that and I've been recommended to everyone. It's not my number one thing of the year, but it's one I would most recommend to the random person. I think one thing that's interesting is that it kind of plays around with WHO with the parasite, because at the same time as the most obvious look is that obviously it's a poor family trying to earn money and get a better condition from Richard family, there's also the added where, you know, the poor fable the actually changes themselves completely for the richer family and getting golfed in their life as well. So the so there's at all times this kind of duality of who is actually the parasites. I think for me, we weakness is of it also shines a little bit there because even though it had does so much well and it's a very powerful and great film, it plays around the metaphor is a little bit too obviously in terms of just what it wants. What it does is striking. It kind of interesting, but balance and comparison to sort of we mistering the way with kind of wants to beat home it's points with everything from, you know, the poor people living submerged in the earth and the richer people living on top of hills and all of these very obvious visual elements to this drive home that message which, it was obvious, also ties in really well with not a very hierarchical film snoppiers that bond did just a few years earlier. So it's a topic and a TV keeps returning to. I entirely agree about appears being a great companion piece o Pis. So was also, very luckily, a film that, even though I didn't see in cinemas, I entered into a very few expectations or that I really knew about. It was what was happening in the first carriage on the train and, without spoiling it, there's more to the film than that. So that's took me on a really great ride, the same way that parasites did and I have been recommending stop here. So to the few people have said our so Parasila, really liked it, but none of them have actually watched it yet. I need to get back onto that. And that's pretty interesting too, because obviously it's no pairs. Is actually an English language films in Pretty Major Stars and it's actually an action film as well, with a lot of fantastic battle scenes. So it's just really are that people would be jumping to see it after slightly mortistic, slightly more message driven Brahma comedy like parasite, which, even though it's quite powerful, it's certainly not an action film. To cuishes this point, I would say that parasite is a blunt film, but I don't think being blunt is necessarily bad. I think subtlety is sometimes a bit it's a bit overweighted, and I think parasite manages to be blunt and subtle at the same time. With the characters themselves. I think the characterization is somewhat subtle in some ways, even though the finmaking is extremely blunt. I agree with that. That's a great point and tying this over to my favorite film of last year, which is terrence malick's a hidden life. And I'm not sure how most of you feel about reason terrence malick, and know that his reputation hasn't always been dropping as it's been pumping out more and more and more films and come further and further away with narrative cinema, but I did personally go as far as calling him the greatest director of the past decade, or at least placed him in the running. And making seven films in nine years, the more soul and head and four decade career up to that point, and each of them, except a hidden life, going further and further into perfecting his style and vision. This is something incredibly interesting in seeing an artist perfect his style and strip more and more and more away until you end up with something as pure as song to song. It's certain of this best, but is still fantastic, and I think that Malik, after stripping away the narrative for poetry and emotion, this flowing consciousness and narrative, the story really is the emotional core and the emotion that's presented. It was so interesting to see him return to his origins. We had a talk about temperati cinema recently and I can't believe I did not not put forward Malik as a candidate for director who will be able to bring something news to that medium, because I can't think any other director, with...

...the possible exception of maybe don't look good oar, that has done more to create a this beautiful expression of shooting on digital. A hidden life truly is more than a portrayed like any Malik I wish will symphony of emotion is just this way he paints with emotion that makes him so incredibly special. But here for wants and just to say this again, it is all centered on one story. On one human person, a real story, a biography. Yes, you get in the wonderfully beautiful full shots of what they can call it the greatest hits of Malik in the from fields and farming and grass, hands on said grass. You know it's all there. But you know, after freeing up his camera from the plot in his previous films and learning to hold on two emotions, even into the abstract, is able to pour all of that into the tail of a man willing to lose it all what he believes. I don't think anyone can shoot scenes of simple dialog in the same way as Malik, where there's such power, such perspective, such flows, such movements, the angles and the focuses, the way he creates emotion from voices, the objects that the way people's hands move, the way the cameras angled and focused in. You know, it elevates every single second and makes this possibly one of the most emotionally strong films that has ever been made. I mean just look at this in for instance, with Brune Ugans, the fertility that he and Malik brings the rules of the judge. You can see his fertility, you can see his feelings of uncertainty of remorse just so tenderly and deeply this film. It's such a contrast of watching the night of cops or sound to song, where the relationships are so obscured and time does not even seem to matter in those cases. Truly becomes, you know, the poetry of emotions. You know about all else, and well that works in this film. He's really managed the poor all of that in and sent all that emotional power towards one single individual protagonist, narrative and story, and that allows you to just feel this character and just feel his life in a way I don't think you've ever felt a life portrayed on the screen before. I quite like a hidden life as well. I'm not the biggest fan of manic but I haven't completely fallen off with him as many people have. That of caps, I think is finally looks great. It's way weird, but I like it. He in life, as you say, is a much more grounded film, much more narratively driven film, and it retains all of that wonderful style, the amazing shots of nature. I agree. The way he should humans is quite unique and quite communicative. I think I do have where two issues really with the films. One is again the language issue, but I want dwell on that. The other one is that it is hey geography right. It makes its central character to be a saint and which is, of course, what make being a very spiritual filmmaker. That makes sense and I guess I have an issue with that. You talked to earlier about obviousness and I think that bothers me because no one is a saint, that that just doesn't exist. And I mean, I don't know how you feel about it, but especially the end of the film, the final there's a cart at the and I don't remember what it says, but it's really made me think that this film was about that's about to saint and that's does better me. I think there's more complexity to it and simply telling the story of some of the malexies as the same. But it's clearly, as everybody knows, the deeply fairtual person and he brings the spirituality into his film. Personally, I didn't feel that as off putting anyways. That I think the way he can just direct his feelings and his all creates this all that, at least I felt as well, and he does. That's just so incredibly well. I guess maybe it says something about me that I have is an easier time when the OH is placed on nature than when it is placed upon single human being. But maybe, again, that's more about me than about medic and with that said, they have gone through all of our top five favorite films of two thousand and nineteen. We would love to go through with our horror eleventions as well, but I teach this will stand for now. Thank you so much for joining guys and talking through your favorite films. It's been a blast and I hope all of you will come on as in form a share your top five favorite films, or even go further to your top ten or twenty as well. Once again, thank you for listening and join us again soon. You have been listening to talking images, the official PODCAST OF ICM for...

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