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Episode 33 · 1 year ago

Best Films of 2018: Our Top 5s

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Get ready for a flash from the recent past! In this episode Chris, Matthieu, Sol and Tom break down and discuss their 5 favourite films of 2018 + their runner ups. What were yours? 

You are listening to talking images, the official podcast of ICM Forumcom. Welcome back everyone. I'm Chris, and today is extremely exciting as we're doing our second ever rank down. This time we're talking two thousand and eighteen. Materia, Sault and Tom are back to break down and discuss their choices of the five best films of the air and, just as last time, the structure is really simple. We will go in a circle where each of us present our fifth choice, then, once we're done, we move on to our fort th, second and finally our number one, personal favorite film of two thousand and eighteen. If a film happens to be on multiple lists, will skip bit for the lower spots and allow the person who loaded the most to present it. This is also because, as our love of the film grow, they will get more focus and more time. But, just as last time, I'm extremely excited to announce that the overlaps are minimal. Of the twenty possible slots in this episode, only three or on two lists, and none or on three or more. That that means will cover seventeen films. Will also change one thing. Last time we did not set aside time or space to even give us the less. A shout out to our other ups. An absolute tragedy. So before we get into the sectual full arm ranked down we will and number this will be quick run down our UNWRAPS. So, without further ADO, Matia kick kick us off. What are the films that missed out on your top five? Hey everyone, so the first that missed out. The first one would be me high, the animated him by memo, Whoo Souda. Really love his swims in general, especially Wolf Children, but be high has that same warmth to it, which is the topic. We've talked about it. Yeah, it's about this boy and his sister and the classic thing of being scared of another child coming anyway. A great a great animated. Then I've got first man, which I want to get into because we talked about it on the space exploration episode already. But great film. The favorites, which we talked about later. Hersman, which is a thing that I think sort talked about another episode, is hating it. I understand that it's very abrasive them, especially the first parts, but this kind of Foren wise narrative redy worked on me, especially because of Elizabeth Moss performance, which is just great. And then I'll also mentioned M to be my neighbor, the documentary about Mr Rogers, someone have I was not super familiar with, not being, you know, American. Yeah, it's a very thoughtful a documentary about this guy from what did you don't American TV, is really quite special and it's a very emotional documentary which we recommends. That's my on themnions. All right, thanks, materia so soul. And then we have some films you really want to shout out. Okay, so it was really hard to go top five and then try and find five runners up out of the hundred and twenty three and a half films that I've seen so far from two thousand and eighteen and a half. Yeah, I don't ask that that's going to really annoyed Tom but I'm actually in the middle of watching a Belgian film from two thousand and eighteen that I've had to pau so we can do the podcast, although it's been going to be stocked. It's quite intriguing so far. I don't think I'll make my top ten, but is quite interesting. But Anyway, I digress. Of the runners up, I've chosen to go with a movie cord am the I am, which is about a Webcam model who finds that a dopple goinger has taken over our account and she's trying to like regain online identity, and I just thought it really tight well into the fears of being, I would, unable to control your online experience, but also is about the risks of going too far in terms of getting fame, because she was doing more and more and more good things to try and get more viewers. Yeah, just a very interesting our horror film. If you like horror, think it's a good film for you. If you like me, and it's a great film, or so. It's got a really excellent color scheme that really makes the offline world look very different from the online world. Pronounced Pinks, purples and blues, or night spot. I've got a similar sort of film in away coured searching. It occurs all on screens. Camera occurs partly on screens, but you're searching a sort of like the whole unfriended open windows dynamic. This man's looking for here is our...

...lost daughter and he's hacking into a social media accounts will get for clues and everything that we're seeing as occurring on a screen and it's a incredibly well done, really great forwances from John Show and Deborah Messing Bake spot. With my obsessive compulsiveness I've gone for eighth grade, but it is a great film. Also just a film about a teenager who is very worried about entering up high school from middle school without having a boyfriend. Just a very denitt performance by Elsie Fisher. Most of the most telling moments are actually when she's diverting eyes away rather than looking at the camera and I just thought you're the actor. Thing was Josh Hamilton imposed a father, very good performance, also very funny, really good music choices. Or seventh spot, I went with the man who killed Don Quixote. They Terry Gilliam film about the trouble production of the DON quote film and it's a bit of a Meta quality in there. That's what about a trouble film production and Jonathan Price is just amazing in it as an actor who's actually become deluded into thinking is Don Kyote after previously acting in a film that the Adam driver character made about the Don Kyote and all that. Adam driver is good, but there's also a whole lot of blurn between fantasy and reality, since really a lot well, alongside doctor Panassas and a few other really cool films that Terry Gilliam has made. And for number six, I've got the favorite, but again, that's a film that we will get too shortly, so I will pass on to someone else. All right. Thanks, soul. And finally, Tom what that of films that would have kept you up at night? It's in the into delirium of guilt if you can not present them right now. Thanks, Chris. So I've seen a hundred and thirty three films from the year and my honorable mentions. They're not in any particular order, but I've got three excellent horror films that I like to recommend and too, weird and wonderful films that I think a lot of people would enjoy. So, for the horrors are asked, has brilliant film hereditary, that came very close to making it to my top five. Then we've got John Kazinski's a quiet place, which is the creepy film where the main characters are unable to make any noise for fear of being assaulted by these vile creatures that have taken over the earth. Then there is Gareth Evans Brilliant Cult Film Apostle, which is quite a different direction from his previous work on his films is martial arts films, the raid and the raid redemption, and I think it's a great change of pace for Gareth. Evidence with that. The other two films are David Robert Mitchell's under the silver lake, which was a brilliant potential cult classic in the making. I feel it's got the feel of it, and midnight movie. It's really surreal and strange, weird and wonderful. It's a great follow up to it follows. And then finally there is another weird and wonderful film, sorry to bother you, by boots Riley. This was very dark, very funny and goes in some very strange directions towards the end. So highly recommend them. So hope that, you know, you enjoy all five of those if you get the chance to check them out, and I'd love to hear what your numbers tend to. Six our Chris, thanks to Anser on my number ten is the dark and brooding. Then met again big an elephant sitting still, which is just wristling in existentialism created by WHO BOO, which unfortunately will never be able to great and not the film again, because he committed susie just as the film was finished, before it was released and became quite international success, which is an absolute tragedy. My I'm more positive note, still a little bit of a gloomy film, is my number nine, a Portuguese woman by Rita Asaba, the glomer's which is just stunningly beautiful and it essentially feels like large portraits coming to life, the way it stage is scenes and dialog with detail. It's just absolutely fantastic. My number eight is David Lowery is the old man and the gun, which is Robert Redford final starring or role and serves as just a wonderful way to not just commemorating his past career but also bring back the kind of fun se s crime adventure film in an atmosphere that is going to updated for today. My seventh is called war by Pavel Polyakowski, which is a shot in stunning black and white in the Myatography and highlighting a tragic romance in cold Warshakos Lokia. And finally, my sixth place is the visually arresting Long...

Day's journey in tonight, which truly lives up to its name, with the last half being again doin dream like Odyssey. I think can be is undoubtedly one of the best directors working right now, and the only reason that this did not shoot into my top five is because of the slightly more comprived plotting in his first half. So I would say gun be fantastic at creating immercy visual experience, is still needs a little bit of work on his storytelling. So, with my sixth place all out of the way, and take you so much, everyone for not just diving into and dissecting each other's tend to six choices. You manage to get through this in just about ten minutes and we're ready to actually die in a lot deeper into our number five, number four, number three, number two and finally our first choice. Let's just get started a gamut your what is your number five film of Two Thousand and eighteen? Well, this would be quick because my number five is higher on someone else is list, and that is Spikeley's Black Lensman, surprisingly fun film about the KKKA. That's all I say from now we get back to it, all right, and so what is your number five? One, number five of two thousand and eighteen is a film. Is Tort I'm probably going to butcher because I'm not sure exactly how to pronounce and I think it's cord and had done. It's an Indian film. It's in the IMDB top to fifty and it's sort of bucks a trend as being maybe the one Indian film that does actually belong in the IMDB top to fifty. So, in a not shell, it's about a blind pianist who learns about a crime but is unable to report it. I don't I want to say too much because lots of twists and turns along the way, but the film really maybe think a lot about human decency. It waves a tapestry of morally conflicted characters and some who act less honored be honorably than others. There are several suspenseful moments throughout, especially as his love comes into danger and as things further further spiral out of control. I mean, some of it is a little bit goofy, but in general I thought it was a great film. I thought it was really in the mold, are they hitchcocky and thriller and I found it absolutely rivetting from start to finish. I just would have never expect that of the Indian film. In the imd we talk to fifty. So not all Indian films are like three idiots and this is one of those films that proves it. Yeah, I'm how doing is. We do a crazy film, you bring a hitchcock. I see what you mean there. With some scenes that's what's came to my mind. was more the coin bothers and it kind of has that kind of nonsensical energy of something like that. After reading where the characters are doing wild things with also the very dark view of humanity, and it's also all put together in this body with package where you have a bunch of different genres and different tones being mixed. I don't think the way the characters behave really holds up. It seems that that they mostly behave in the way that will advance the plots in the most kind of crazy often way. But I do think it's a very fun time. I think the director, but you managed to keep an energy throughout the film that's that kind of works for this this story. I agree with Matthew. It's got a very conesque brothers feel to it. It's quite a far fetched film and there's a mix of genres, has been mentioned, but it is engaging throughout, even the handful of Bollywood style songs that are in their their phone. It's very twisty and unpredictable plotline, which keeps you engaged, and so I did enjoy this one, although I felt it would have potentially been better if it was played completely straight as a pitch black comedy. But for what it was, it's still a fun time. Yeah, I can pretty much agree with what you guys are saying and I can understand the view point. The current brothers reference is interesting because Adam from New York is not with us this week. He actually also watched the film I recommendation. He said it had a very kind brothers film and apparently the filmmakers wanted to do something that was modeled after Farg the original likeninety six film, but the TV series. And Yeah, look, I think a lot about and had done it from pronouncing correctly a lot of was just the way. I totally taught me about surprise. We had an Indian subcontinent challenge on the ICM forum and it was just a film that was available all or to watch. Who Car Watch should. It's on the...

...ird we talk to hundred and fifty and no expectations and the just enter within our expectations. It just blew me away. I have no idea if the impact would be signed the same second time around, and I think if I did watch the second time, probably would pick up a little bit more and a few of the waknesses that sort of you know, maybe went under the right for me, because just amazed about how the quality of film it was. So my number five is another film that channels the energy of the camember of us. It's a plat comedy from Australia, Groves Nest, but it is ranked higher up in souls less. So will talk more about that later. And I suppose that brings us to mind number five, which is Christian pets transit, the final part of his cetematic oppressive systems trilogy and essentially pants. It is a philosophical, taught experiment. In a way it takes it to a never world, which is does by taking a book placed in occupied France piece and adopting it for today, with no real alterations except closed weapons and making it look like contemporary France were essentially facing something we have not quite seen an echo from the past, and this film really feels like an existential echo throughout, and it has the Classic Office scation and minimalism pets sold is known for. It the brutal in simplicity and the ways of finding suspense, a plot and details are largely vague and known. I would go as far as to call it beautifully vague. It can even feel like a tragic dream where we see characters simply trying to escape, get transit to another country and another life. And because there is this echo, because it is close to our world that's so far away, the experience almost becomes a real and hellish I mean, I think it's an absolutely wonderful film and I'm really happy that pets old managed to find this type of material because, even though it's so good at setting up suspense in its film and setting up the atmosphere in this film, I think he often struggles with finding material that cuts a little bit deeper. So I think this really is a film that allows him to show off exactly what he can do. I was a bit on the fence with transits. I was hooked throughout and I was curious to see what was going to happen, though. I felt that the decision to film it kind of in the modern day, where and it's based on a story sets during the war, was a bit jarring an unusual. It was certainly interesting they were didn't think it was wholly successful. I feel that the director missed out on the opportunity to focus on a mysterious, gloomy story set it to a port in in France, something like port of Shadows, for instance, which is one of my favorite fields. Instead of there you know the gloomy, Shady Port, you've got the industrialized port and I don't know, I feel like it would have been a stronger film if they did kept to the original setting rather than placing it in contemporary times. But it's certainly an interesting watch, so I was glad that Chris recommended this one. I really disliked transit, and I hate to say that because I know it's when it's just hot. Five films and I did watch specifically for the PODCAST. For the most part during transit I was like, well, you know, this is okay. The part that Tom found jarring about the modern day and the older frats put together was actually probably my favorite part of the film. I like the fact because it also like a modern day setting, but they had like a lot of old school technology, like the old transistor radio. I found that really interesting. But I breathe what Tom said about they're not being that much doom and gloom. I guess I also just thought there wasn't really that much tension. The other wasn't that much suspense. There's a great part early on where one of the soldiers asks to see the main guy's page is doesn't have any, so he runs away and it gets chased. And why? Al It's going to be a really good or annoyed thriller, but it never really amounts to anything. It became a bit of a Sarah get far the Sun Story. It became a little bit of a love subplot with a refugee woman. None of that was ever as interesting to me as the whole Paroi of the Times, which is what I was expecting. There's some stuff with bureaucratic red tape and he goes and see some officials, but again that's a very small part of it. So I guess for the most part I just thought, you know, this is just such a missed opportunity, especially with really interesting things going on with having the modern and the old mix together, and it...

...was pretty much going here, this is a really too great but then the end credit song came on and I'm like no, this film's disc like, I mean the incredit something is kind of like fun, the Bit Ironic. I don't think it's going to be a spoiler say what the song is. The song is road to nowhere by talking heads and when I heard it I'm like yeah, this thumbs up the film. So well, it just just goes nowhere. So yeah, sorry, it was a dislike for me, very so. So. Well, defend the last little dop talking head song and I think it's actually very appropriate for the them I do agree that it's a little jabbing because the thin ends on the bit of a melancholy note and it's a more it's a looking head song, so it's more happy, but the message of the song is we appropriate for the theme. D It's it's the famous titled Transit, because it's kind of these people are in transit and in the way we are all in transits and that sounds a little silly to say, but I think that's really kind of the point of the film. It's a thing that I enjoyed. I think it's got the shots. In particular, I would say Marx say is a very, very cinema friendly city, but one that doesn't get used that much for a bunch of reasons, and so it was really nice to see it shot this way. And it also helps when you have power bearing your film in terms of beauty that's that suppressed. But I think I had a little trouble with the device write the conceits of this being seemingly in Modern Day France. I think that's very interesting idea, but I don't feel that the film does much with it. Maybe I don't know. I thought at first there was a political point being made, but it just kind of goes away. I don't know. It feeds artificial and to me it ends up distracting from what the film is really interested in, which is this idea of displaced people and how they leave, which is very Casablanca. That's coffing. That came to mind most for me, especially with some of the data plot developments regarding who gets on vehicle, not to play in this case, but still kind of the same idea, and the woman's suspects also. So I like the thing, but in the end, I thought that what the picture of it do, what should be the most interesting part of it, ended up being kind of bitter destruction for you know, that's fair enough for me. I do think that the vagueness of key drink because it makes it peel so much more dream like, essentially, and it think. I think the fact that it is so vague leaves your mind open to wonder about these things far more as well. But moving on to our number four choices, because that's right, we're already finished our fifth choices. What's your number four favorite film of two thousand and nineteen my job, so my number four is actually the year spend or winner, shoplifters, by Hill Gazukhida. Is Hard to describe what makes Koreed as films in general work so well for me. He's a pretty sentimental director, which is generally not what I prefer, but he really earns that sentimentality to writing characters that feel real and by filming the environments, especially in tears, in ways that makes them feel lived in. And that's really the case here with the House that this makeshift family is staying in. And maybe I'd be more appropriate to say that he's an incredibly empathetic director, rather than sentimental maybe, and that is exactly what you need for this story of this family that, when looking at the facts in a Colde de touched way, may appear to be despicable, but when not framing comes into play late in the film, it's almost like ice cracking under your feets, because how empathetic again, great us in making is and how good a performances are, especially bicycle under as. The mother mustly makers and for some reason can which comes to my must have made this tragic caution everyday about hopefully, people are treated in modern safety. But because here that makes it into something more humanistic, he has the social context of the film. We informed by the characters rather than the other way around, which to me makes it all the more powerful. I did really like shoplifters. I thought it was a great film and a great look at how strong the family ties are in a family that sort of in the marginalized part of society. I thought it actually had a bit in common with parasite in a way. And of course they're below palm or winners at the Ark on film festival. So I wasn't quite a strong for me and shoplifters, but I just thought the connection between the characters were great. I don't know about s sentimental, but yes, I think a great empathetic it's a very empathetic...

...film and I really like the the actress who played the young girl. I thought she was excellent, as well as the one who plays her dropt to brother who begins to question his theeving. If I add one criticism of the film, though, it's probably that for a film called shoplifters as not a whole lot of shoplifting in there and I would have loved to see more of the sounds funny. I would have loved to have seen more of the clever raising shoplifting at tense. I mean there's an amazing one. It's in the tryals. It's probably nice small as well, as we like unplug the part that sort of like beach when somebody walks through so they could take and shotlift something out without the shot, without shotkeeper knowing, and just those sort of schemes just so really cool, so clever. I would have loved have seen more that film called shotlifters. But I do agree that it's great film and it's easily in my top half of the films that I've seen in two thousand and eighteen. So I've seen a number of films back creader, and I've got to say that I have enjoyed them all, though I don't find any of them particularly remarkable. He's got this brand of contemplative human drama that he seems to present and he creates these fascinating, brooding storylines, but they never seem to really grab me or engage me the way that a favorite film would. Sarah, I enjoy shoplifters. It's a good watch, butts I found it nothing particularly special, and just want to say that salt comparison to parasite is really spot arm. I hadn't thought about this before, but it's kind of the dysfunctional way it just playing around with the family elements in the in the early part of the film. I think that shoplifters is a good film, not necessarily a great film, but it's really well acted, is really immersive, and I completely agree as well with what you said matter in that when it's shifts gear from being this more UN nerving film with suspicious about the family relations and then you suddenly become more empathetic. I think that's that's which completely worked. It's surprising that it worked, it really did, and that also things that their performances are spot on and that, yes, that house truly feels lived in. That such a great setting for a story as well. So I think that it really nailed the atmosphere and the kind of world it was establishing, though I will also completely agree with Saul. For a film we'll shoplift shoplifters. There should have been more shoplifting and those things were some of the best ones in the film. Yeah, I mean that's I say. I mean it's a pretty memorable scene when they do that. I don't know, I don't feel that the foce to do to spend forty minutes on shopliftings just because it's the title. But yeah, the comparison with parasite was definitely one that came to my mind when parasites. What I saw outside, I was like, Oh, they basically gave it to the same film twice in a row. I mean two different takes on the same on a similar story. So so what's your fourth favorite film up two thousand and eighteen? So the film that I've selected for my fourth rivorite is an Australian film, which is quite unusual for me because a spot living here, I'm not really big fan of Australian cinema in general. This is really good one. It's from the team behind Kenny, which I don't know if many of the listeners would have seen. It was very popular down here. Sort of jovial comedy about a sad guy that's with toilets and one every works with toilets for a living. But it's a much darker comedy than that and involves two brothers who arrived and isolated cottage early one morning to plan a crime. Now, as the film progresses along, we learn more and more about their crime, the intended victim and the motives, and they're not all that it seems to be at first. First Act of the film is absolutely terrific. There's great coke battamage when the brothers as they meticulously matt their actions. Some really clever parts here they got to be sitting their phones over to another, I'm city and then back, so we've got trucking on the phones that they haven't been at the place where they're going to commit the crime. Second Act of the film gets more interesting as the plot becomes more twisted and the third act was not quite as good as the first two. But you know, I still thoroughly enjoyed the film. It has a very Carter barluesque music school, if I can coin a term there. It's very much like the music of Carter Burwell, and with that in mind, I really thought I was watching a bit of a Coen brothers film, with the whole experience and just away things played out and just all the dark common vibes that come out with this crime story. I'm so pleased that I'm not alone in loving brother's nest, because...

...it is a brilliant black comedy. I mean for the first half of the film the Brothers are the only characters on screen and the morbid humor of their interactions builds and builds, until events take it in for a worse and the situation begins to spiral out of control, and the director bridges this change in mood with ease. The slow burn of the initial setup enables the audience to connect with these two brothers, Terry and Jeff, leaving us fully invested in their plight, and the crescender of violence makes you question how far the siblings will go and, as the tense situation escalates, their graphic scenes which vidge dangerously close to horror territory, and I feel it it's refreshing to see such an original take on the downfall of a dysfunctional family, especially it seemlessly blends elements of black humor with it a playful streak of brutal violence, and it still manages to have a profound emotional effect on the viewer. So I think that brother's nest is a destined future court classic and one that there is of a taste for the darker sider cinema would do well to seek out immediately. Yeah, we enjoyed the brothers nest. I think it's funny that we have all of these grand brother's connection again. I guess there should really have made them filming for the night and there would be an honest but that. Yeah, I agree with strong with escalation. I find that quite quite entertaining and one things I will want connection, I would add, is it made me single little bit of breaking bad in the sense that it is very process focused, especially at the start and even the setting. It's Australian, of course, but it's, you know, small town will and actually, if you familiar with us, a few episodes of working bad, the fact that they're kind of in this house and after deal with a difficult situation it did. They are connections there and possy ones. I quite like the eye, the acting and the humor. I think it's yeah, it's a good thing. Maybe I don't like it was as much as you guys, but definitely something I would recommend. Products. Nest definitely won me over and it's a great our comedy. It's beautifully suspenseful and it's one of those films that's just really enjoys being dark, which is something my number four does as well. But I really felt that, though, with all this dialog and man the rhythms just poking fun, that the concept that this kind of very morbid way, it's almost like a bit of a modern day rope tie you to a little bit to hitchcock as well, notice the Cohen Brothers. It's thoroughly had this that's fun with the dark concept that I think that there's only two issues I have it at personally. The first one is that a lot of the dialog feels a lot like exposition, and the sect one this that like Salt said that the third act is the weakest and it feels a little bit like it suddenly wants to try to be struck cool. But as a film that's set in one single location at, you know, this family farm and just almost entirely done through dialog with such a small cast, I think it's just very well done and I definitely agree with Tom that this could easily become a cult favorite. It's interesting that Matthew does mention this is the second comb brothers type film that's popped up in my list because the battle of buster scrugs, which is there are two thousand and eighteen film, almost may my list of honorable mentions. It's got an amazing first part in there. The other stories aren't quite as great as the first part, but it's still a really cool film and I guess like the corn brothers a lot, so I guess come brothers influence films do tend to impress me the right connections. Interesting. Chris, I hadn't actually thought about that before. I get what you're saying with the singular location, but I suppose with Royp I guess I've always seen there's a bit more of a gimmick film than anything else, whereas brothers in nest, as a film, I think, really does something really interesting with the story beyond having a Gimmickrle let's try and make it look like one continuous take up. That's just me. Well, that that's perfectly fast all. I think brothers is definitely doesn't have anything close. So that type of Gimmick I might just mentioned with the other dark there you look. I did from the third disappointing. I don't know if it's trying to be too cool, but I think it was just the way it's sort of like ends on a drug. I mean there's one one at the end. It's sort of made me Google. I'm sort of like, I don't know if I should be laughing at this point. So yeah, I don't know. Through went a bit all outcome with it there as well, with a lot of puns and dialog. That was it was both cool and fact to be cool at the same time. So I think it's it is still successful, quite like the end, and I felt that it was. It was fitting and it makes sense for the development of the character arcs. And I've just got to say that matty's...

...reference of breaking bad is a great, great thing to point out. I think if you enjoy breaking bad, you definitely enjoy this. And former early on the two brothers addressed in these suits, almost like Hasmat suits, and I can see why that immediately the calls memories are breaking bad. So yeah, if you like breaking bad, check out brother's nest and let me taken usitly, forgot about but I don't a scrubs as I like actually, but yeah, not, not, not, maybe not the best from from the GIN bothers, which, yeah, I thought, I thought they hadn't make many of him. Incredibility this the races. But to get back on the topic and the continuing with our number four films. What your for favorite film off when dyteen Tom So, sometimes we need to switch off with some undemanding, escapist entertainment, and my number four fits the bill for me. quickly. It's ready player one by Steven Spielberg. For those who are familiar with the storyline, ready player one is set in the near future. I think it's two thousand and forty five, something like that, and it follows an often teenager on a quest to discover a fortune that is being hidden in a virtual world by its Creator Spiel bigs playful adaptation of the classic Sci Fi novel is so much fun. It's full of nostalgia for Classic Video Games and homage is to some of my favorite films. That made it impossible for me to resist its charm. The huge, explosive action sequences transport you into a futuristic vision of multiplayer gaming. There is absolutely mesmerizing and will undoubtedly strike a cord with anyone who spend far too much time playing video games f when they were younger. But I think it will also appeal to a new, younger crowd who were not necessarily familiar with all the video games a references, but can just go along with a ride and enjoy this entertaining slice of fun from Spielberg. So I was really another fan of when you player one at all. I want dwell into it too much, but it felt a bit to me like an old guy trying to play with tools that he kind of didn't have mushre of for it's feels. It doesn't seem to me like much of the celebration of video games at all. Not that I need it to be that, but it sounds it's a moralistic in the ways that I didn't quite like and I didn't find the characters very, very, very written. One thing I will say, though, is that I think some of the action sequences work well. I think the whole whole marge to the shining is quite a quite fun, definitely, and seeing what the player once soon after, I don't remember which mather film it was, that I thought well, yeah, you can see that there's a real director in terms of action. I mean I like come album, but Spinberg definite too does much better with it. But yeah, I'm not not a fan of all. I think ready player one was quite the enjoyable. I was really unsure about the heading in because, like the real world seemed almost as digital as the world of the game and as you get this kind of narration, it was like essentially like seeing wreck it Ralph narrated by the kid from the Goldberg. But I think it grew on me as it went along and I did really enjoy the shining part. They literally go into the Overlook Girl Hotel and it does have a lot of fun in it. It plays around a lot. I think I completely agree with my tour that it's really well choreographed. The action scenes are quite quite good. But I will also agree that it didn't feel as much as a love lend to these games and films, but maybe except the shining in a few others. But more like this an endless a degree of just quick cale marches and shout out we often with care. Is this literally shelting out the type of character marble and said out I was coming in there with this it. It didn't really work that that well for me, but it was perfectly endurable. I thought that ready player one was okay. I didn't think it was a great film, I didn't hate it. I know that some haters out there and other people like Matthew, disliked it. So I didn't hate any play one. I didn't dislike a hordeor's okay. But then again I'm a bit of a spill Burg apologist. I guess I really like Spielberg Films in Journal and well, and I actually think is a is a quite a skilled filmmaker and I guess with that backgrounds expecting something, I guess, a bit more entertaining. I guess maybe like a Jurassic Park type of you know, or war of the world. There's a little bit of depth in there as well. As being a bit of a blockbuster. And Yeah, I don't know the depth there was really anything too great. I mean there's a tire, so you know, spend more time in the whirlword message in there shining. Like my cohosts, I agree that the recreation of the shining is the absolute high point of the film, although rather than it being something...

...where I was and able to resist the charms, like Tom said, because of the whole Shining Rocation, it actually made me wish I was watching the shining instead. And and since any player by my I've actually had doctor sleep that sort of done the same sit thing and try to go back in the Overlook Hotel, I think sort of did it in a bit more of interesting manner. Look, there's some good things about really play one. The visual effects or excellent. I thought Mark Rylance was our great in it, as they are creator of the game. I thought it was really interesting performance, really interesting character, even there's not in it for a lot of it. The most of the cast or thought on and maybe acceptable at best, I thought by I thought Tye Sheridan was very unharismatic as the the character. And Yeah, I guess I just didn't find it are too interesting or really to original. I guess, other than the shining recreation power, enough interesting elements in there that I wasn't bored and I didn't hate it, but I guess, coming as somebody who does dury like Spielberg films, it was a bit of a disappointment. I think. Just one more critique, and really sorry the this time, but I think one if you have it. It was it didn't really feel like it's that that prop parody off like these conventions, but it just had all these s conventions just mimicking teams that would be fun in an eight these film and this bring it all back, but without really adding and the extra to it is didn't really work the way it otherwise shouldn't have it. It's just felt a little bit false, especially when you have people you know in the t s and you have these teenagers. We are all obsessed with e s pop culture, which is also seemed a bit bizarre. I will say more Thur Islands, despite in some of the scenes looking a lot like you, was costplaying a character from the big bank there. It's great. I think Mark Islands always is great, so it was a nice seeing him in the movie. Definitely elevated it. I think he raised a good point about the nostalgia for the S. Then, for me, added, you know, it had in the sense of Pahn and the magical feeling, because the nostalgia was relevant to me because I grew up playing these games, and the references to the Easter eggs and their secret levels and things like that, and they helped me to overlook things like the not particularly great acting from the lead and the other flaws that you pick out, because I was having such a fun time with this and I think that anyone who, you know, was obsessed with video games as I was ron growing up will love this, and you know, that's why it hits such a street spot for me. They really good. That's definitely a great defense. And moving on to my number four, which is the favorite by your goals, loved them us and honestly, ving for all the extra organza and the naked, weaked up Toror politicians in the sixteen hundreds, this is probably his most conventional film to date, certainly since his earlier films, but but all the same it has the absurdity of excess and decadence, I mean, which centually just turned into a good has fantasy in the proportions, but fitting Peter Greenaway film. It's what is so striking is just how much this film just seems to love existing. It loves the Games in the brutality, the dark cruelty and wrail threats. It's colorful teasing and you know, it's like, oh my homage, like it's just how much is just loves the clothes, weeks, mannerisms and the manners, not not to mention breaking them. I mean this is the kind of film that just has so much fun, that winking at you as the traps are set and the hands and the value of the cars and people hands change. And then you have the camera work, often at extreme perspectives, and it just loving the fish islands. We giving just this sweeping perspective. We may be close to the floor, otherwise just feel at the edge and it really puts us into the unstable mind of Queen Anne and just the volatility of the game that's being played here as well. And let's just put like this, Olivera Coleman is simply incredible as Queen Anne and as someone with, at least at this point in time, limited health and seemingly even limited mental abilities. Almost with the mind of a child, the way she acts. And then, you know, explore how it is essentially push the manipulated by both the racial life and I'm a stone, while she is...

...the one with ultimate power. Makes it all the more intriguing and just above all, darkly comedic underving and just it really delivers this tour the force of playful emotions and what well not, you know, the usual cold and bleak world were salts go to die with, we've come to expect from Lamtimus. I mean this is pretty damned dark all the same. Yeah, I love the favorite. As I mentioned, it was pretty close to making my top five, and I generally have a soft spot form historical films that don't feel grand use or don't try to feel self important. Right. That kind of deflates the weight of history, and I think the favorite is a great example of that. The performances, I agree, Lisa Colman is great and she wanted us her. Good for her, but for me the standards was actually in my stone. She I would say she's the lead of the film and she really anchors it's she really gives you someone kind of true wood for I mean everyone is kind of however, in this film, I mean it is a yourgostensible swimming. It doesn't have that yeah, the eyes thing and super monotone acting of his previous films, that you still have that kind of lack of faith in humanity. That's it's extremely fun. Yeah, I really enjoyed the facts. I'll so really like the favorite. It's such a fun quirky vision of British history that perhaps you could only get from a Greek director tackling the subject. And I think one thing that that helps the unique vision is, as Chris mentioned, the brilliant camera work, the unusual angles and the fish is lends that really give the film a distinct style all of its own, even though it is clearly influenced by greenways work and there in the draftsman's contract. Now there are a lot of great forces in this film. I like how we're all picking out different actors, but for me I really enjoyed Nicholas Holt's performance. He's striking out to make a very interesting career. He started out in about a boy and then skins and then he's moved on to things like Mad Max, Fury Road and the favor and he's staking on some daborous roles and I thought it really showed a maturity that he's come a long way from me his origin and honestly, I really enjoyed the favorite. It was quite close to cracking my top ten. Maybe on a rewatch it would be pushed up a bit more, because talking about it now as certainly got me excited about the prospect of giving it another go. So I'm going to carry on the trend with the flavor and single out another favorite actor. I thought that Rachel Vice was by far and away the performer in the favor. I mean, I enjoyed all the performances, especially from Olivia Coleman and Emma stone, but just what Rachel Vice manage to do? I just thought she came across as more sympathetic maybe than Emma stone, despite being equally as cunning and manipulative. I don't think I've seen the film recently enough to be able to come up with key examples of it, but I really felt well routing a bit more for her throughout, even though we could see that she was being just as cutting and just as manipulative. The whole film is just incredibly well acted and it's just a great look at the shifting power dynamics between these three women who have all this power in a male dominated world. But you've got all these men around, but the men don't really do anything, they can't really do much and everything is being controlled by these three women. So it's really great sort of historical maybe even revision of the dance moves and some of the dialog definitely doesn't seem like eighteen century England. So it's a bit of an unusual taken things. But yeah, I just loved this. The out shifting power dynamics. I thought there was so much going on there. And the camera work year just incredible. Or the fish eye lensing just makes everything seem very, very rustic, which I thought was absolutely perfect because we're looking at what may or may not have transpired between behind closed doors way back then. So yeah, I'm so love the favorite. Very close to put in my top five, but I had to give that shout out to that Indian film in the IMDB top to fifty. Absolutely acceptable. So now I it's completely agree. All of these performances are spectacular and the Nicholas Walt I completely agree. Like he's such a what he even use describe in this film is at the same time childish and nerving, and this this almost horrifying scheming plotter, and I also see exactly where you're talking about. So in terms of vice ending up being more sympathetic, because I do think that as the film start, you know, obviously we do have Emma stone as this underdog, but as the film progresses you can see just how far she's willing to...

...go, and they got quite close to see the it's kind of sociopathic willingness to play act and be deceptive there. So it's I can definitely see that. Of even with all the things she does, Rice and the ends up being the most empathetic of the three and with the favorite summed up, we're actually on to our top trees. So I'm not sure what's your third favorite film of two thousand and eighteen. manyously is no he big is say Dan's Alex. I guess he all the White Tree. So we to potential Turkish listeners, if I butcher that. I was familiar with say Dan to his true fusions, which most used the desolate landscape of Anatonia. But this most takes place on the Mediterranean coast, which means it feels quite different visually, literally much warmer in every tense of the world than something like winter sleep, for example. This is mostly focused on the young aspiring writer and his relationship with his father, who's played by Muhat Chemshire in a very charismatic performance that's really key to the whole thing. This is a long film that goes on a lot of tangents at times that the father's presence is felt throughout in how it influences every decision the main character makes, and the complexity and depth of emotion of that relationship is what holds it all together and culminates in a pretty powerful and thoughtful ending. Say Down is an extremely talented writer and it shows a here with the dry humor that's presents throughout. But what makes this film special for me is the way he uses editing, especially in a scene featuring two imams discussing ethical issues. And you know, the discussion is interesting enough as it is, but Satan enhances it in the way he frames them in the environment and especially in his use of almost non continuous editing. You know say do and often references check off as a model in terms of writing, and you see that here with the way he can he kind of incorporates short stories into the main narrative and he manages to make all of those different threads of this young man's life add up to something that feeds coherent and even veratory. It's essentially about nothing less than a man trying to learn how to live, and that sounds like a very lofty goal. The setons writing really is absolute task for me, and I should mention that it's also a gorgeous looking for him, as with all of his films, really again that that Mediterranean sitting is used so well, that transit which we mentioned earlier, and the main character who he's at times not very likable. You really feel for him because again, the writing is just just so good. Yeah, really really enjoyed the Wolpert. I think it's a great film and possibly even set once the best film. I think it's definitely interesting contrast with the film immediately preceding it too, with just had this kind of stripped back minimalistic no are essentially, and then you get this which is just almost all carried out through dialog, and I think the dialog was what really impressed and immersed me. Here you have this struggling ropter filled with all of these self pretensions, essentially, and you kind of get both a look at where he will go with his life, but then also just the society around him and the world he kind of wants to leave behind, and I just loved how natural it all feels like. You mentioned that theme with the amounts, which it's probably my stand out seen as well. I think it goes on for about half an hour. It's really just their meeting on the road and then just walking through the landscape talking, both arguing, having fun, having more general conversations, just sitting down for a coffee, and it's the way that conversation evolves. It's really immersed. Really feel it brought in. It's like you're walking along with these friends almost you have these discussions. Is just feel so familiar and I really think that it's I'll manage to do something really special. Yes, I completely agree. The actor a place the father does a phenomenal job and it really anchors the film as well. So I just think it's a wonderful film. It's almost made my pop ten so I'm really glad you included it here so we could talk about it. I'm having to see that you also mentioned this scene with the Imams, because I haven't we watched white the tree. Yeah, I probably should have, because I don't know what it is about that scene. I think it's maybe just what they're talking about, but yeah, I don't know what why it is so special and should we watch it to try and figure it out? To while Patrie is the only film in everyone's topless that I haven't seen. Unfortunately, I'm not being particularly impressed to assailants films up to now, but I am intrigued by your claim recommendations for...

...it, so maybe I'm around to giving it the chance one day soon. I mean not watching three hours films basic makers you don't like is really kind of Madam John, I don't know if, when you're sure what you're doing in this podcast, really you've had the nail and the had the the room time was quite intimidating for film. I wasn't sure if I was going to enjoy enough, but who knows? Yeah, I get that. It does just to suit a little bit. It does feel a little bit different in that dialog is so heavy. I mean I don't think it's fair to for instance, compared to roamer. But all I didn't think a little bit about the three, the mayor and the discotheque in this where you kind of have a similar kind of just long sets of dialog that becomes immersed when I do think that just the way he uses this semi dislikable lead, I mean he's very flawed. His is filled with these pretensions and he just meets these people and some of his interactions like especially one another. One stood out for me was the one W he meets a popular author and it's just sits down the force itself. It's at into his life a little bit, all while critiquing him, kind of doing this mini digs that his writing style, because he's successful and he thinks he has something special, but he hasn't even, you know, properly published a single book yet. And just really love all of these little set pieces. They feel like they work incredibly well as a story on their own, but at the same time they really fit into this greater whole of this just really wayward as semi tragic character and its growth. So moving on. So what's your turn? Favorite him? UNC is quite interesting because I only a few minutes ago I was saying that I don't usually have a drilling films at the top part of my list and I've order gone through brothers nest. I'm now going to mention another Australian. The film if this third place is a film called upgrade. It's by Lee one all, who recently did the remake of the invisible man. So came out a couple of years before that and it's a film that I really liked the first time around, but I found even more interesting at re watching it because actually plays out in a very tragic sort of way which you don't quite pick up the first time. You don't know where it's going to go. Look, my basic oneline description for it would be it's like frank and a lot his brain damage coss with a David Kronenberg body horror film, and I mean that in the best possible way. It involves a quadraplegic who gets an experimental chip installed in his neck which allows them to move his limbs and there's a symbiotic relationship that he develops with the yard ship, because a ship starts talking to him and that relationship soon goes awry, and I just found it a really enticing film, without spoiling it too much, from start to finish, because it goes a lot of interesting directions and turns out to artificial intelligence, but there's also a lot of genre jumping in there. So there's some laugh out loud funny parts in there with some of the things that stem, which is the name of the chip, is able to do inside the host body. And the film just looks absolutely amazing also. So it's set in the future but it's not the far off future and it's just got all these amazing saturated colors be on lighting, all these new fangled sets. The labrary gets the chipping stored as more of like this underground cave. So it's just doctor lives underground. Everything's on the ground. It's got this amazing sort of lab where has these x Ray Parts where I've go through one parts, extray go through another part. It's normal see through. So just lots of really interesting art setting things going on their great art direction, really great unusual music, Scho and just such a haunting ending when you finally work out what's been going along the whole way. And it's just absolutely so tragic and so heartbreaking watching a second time, knowing everything to come. But I guess it just makes it even more of a richer experience knowing everything and diving into it a second time. Yeah, I really enjoyed upgrade as well. It actually has Clayton decos and who place the all the brother in the brother's nest in a smaller role. That I thought it was really fantasy, but now I completely agree with the world here. The world building is great and it looks great and one thing you didn't mention, which I really enjoyed, is just how robut it almost it makes our lead appeared to be, especially the way it it moves around and fights and act it's kin tempered on his back. It is this very darring effect, using darring in a positive way, and it really works. I think my only negatives for this film would be that the plot really feels a...

...bit assembled from s and s tropes and friends and it does like does feel like a film that would have been a very fitting for the early two thousand or even late s. It just the way it looks at the future, the way it's plot the type of plot tools it uses, and I do think that there's elements in just how is the plot is set up that didn't quite work that well for me, but it's a very enjoyable film. It has a lot of actions, it's a lot of fun and, yeah, I really enjoy how this film was made. Yeah, such a grade was a good time sun be almost exploitation fin but I wish it had maybe more leaned into that. And, as Chris said, I think the showy tries to kind of have this twisty story which is pretty predictable and that's not the most effective part of the thing. What's really effective is all of the the action scenes are great. The way whenever it uses tilting of the screen to kind of sell this very robotic move to the natural way his body moves. I think that's great. And Yeah, again, surely as a are so we of revenge. Really I think it works quite well and it's very dynamic and just think of the writing is perhaps not quite there, and so maybe let's focus on look actors without actually been better in this get, especially with the kind of comic book style. A bad guys through a little bit over the top. Leading into that a bit more could have made the feel better, but it would also been a bit of a different film because I really liked how grounded the field was. That the earlier that you didn't necessarily know exactly where it would go either. So I do think it it still works quite well. It's a slick and stylish thrill it. There I I struggle to relate to the main character. Couldn't empathize with the protagonist and while it's certainly inventive, it plays a lot from s films. Like Chris said, it doesn't seem to break any new ground and the standard seemed for me is probably the moment in the bar, but I find the rest of it quite forgettable. I'm struggling to recall many of a memorable moments. So you know, it was a bit of fun at the time. They didn't think it's a film I returned to any time soon. It's very interesting to hear yours talking about that right and especially how matthew went on about it being a revenge film, because I actually forgot to even mention that in my intro to the film. The experimental ship, the sides that it can help the protagonist like revenge, and I guess was it respect. The me is that that was really people took for me when I was first watching it in cinemas, but I really watched it knowing the ending. The whole revenge plot seemed less, less important, but it seemed less of where maybe the focus of the story was for me. I mean I was originally all going, this is a really cool revenge story with this chip it's tearing up with its host to try and get back at the people. But then when I was doing at the second time around, I was much more interested and I guess maybe the chips motives, and I don't really want to spoil it too much in terms of emphasizing with the character. Yeah, I'm not sure about that. I guess I found it quite thetic because the police don't seem to be able to do anything. For me, I guess there was enough of emotional book that I could get into it. But, like I said, the second time around I was really more focused on the chip personal relationship rather than the revenge part of the story. But yeah, I don't know, I think it's incredibly everything film. It's quite interesting how you guys keep saying about all these chrystals, saying it's not sort of like late s early Zeros. I mean I guess it's sort of got maybe similaritius to something like maybe dark said you, or the Matrix, but I guess just with the whole Cronenburgersh vibe of it and just the way that it's got this chip that's tall in him, just reminded me so much of s horror, especially brain damage. But I know I'm digressing here, so I will let somebody else take over. Well, that's perfectly first all, and it does a lot of really interesting things with the world it's in, even though it's just the background. So interesting pick, and thank you for introducing me. Do it so, Tom what is your dread varied film, after when they didn't so earlier on? Chris, you mentioned ballad of busses shrugs and how it had a Netflix release, and the next film in my top five is another film that had a wide Netflix release, and not the only film in my top five to have a netflix release, which just shows the kind of transition that the film industry had been...

...making of late. So my faird film is roaming. Now I'll fonto choir and stunny, beautiful film roam. It follows the life of a middle class families made through a tumultuous period in Mexico's history during the S. it's presented in stark black and white due to choirn's desire to set a mood and ambience that evocative of memory, and the film certainly achieves that with its semi autobiographical tail that feels incredibly real. Even their ROAMA is a skipped back human drama, it is far from devoid of the spectacle that choir and has delivered in his fantastical outings as a director. The unforgettably emotional scene on the beach towards the film's finale is both I shattering and life affirming showcase in the work of a truly talented filmmaker who consistently tangles with my emotions. I haven't Been Rama or Roma, as people know if they've been listened to a few podcasts. I don't have an extremely high opinion of our funds are quorn and everything that I read about the film so suggested to me they wouldn't be out my alleyway. So it's on a Netflix. I've go on Netflix account when I feel more on the mood I will sit down and watch it's not something has become a priori for me yet. Sorry, Tom So. Homa is a film that's kind of feels that an esthetically exercise at times and it's got kind of is somewhat troubling putting. That's, you know, is this is a from so go on making a film about his made when he was a kid. But I think the FAM really gets fast that. Who especially to really beautiful with the impressive sequences, one of which is the birth sequence and the other one, of course, is the end with on the beach. I mean Quan is great at doing these long, long shots, long takes, and that really tell very emotional story and I think it would get in those cases it works great well. So I have a somewhat of a limiting factor with this film, but I think those two scenes alone just deffinitely make it worth it and it's a remarkable technical achievement if nothing else. Yeah, I quite like Roma well, especially the way it felt. Well, it feels limited, little bit of sill gorgeous black and white photography. The camera work is great. I think it's really strong and just evoking emotions. I think my own real issue with the film is that it feels a little bit displaced. It's, like you said, the major it's a little all that this actually have thrown making a film about his mate and it's just seems like it's focus is just how great is for the family rather than really getting close to her and seeing her aspirations or life. Essentially, even though we eat, tries to focus on it, it just feels like you can't really do that and it's essentially this becomes this kind of Legend and myth of his own childhood. But it's a really well made film. It was really interesting to see him do this. After feels like gravity and just ground it so much more. So definitely film I think most people enjoy. Well shot, well might films should see, but not necessarily one of the greatest films of two thousand and eighteen. For me that's it's a flip one for me between is it great it's a just good kind of film. So my number three is bird of passage by CEO Guada and Christina Gallego, which does something to the traditional gangster story I had not seen before. It actually stage it as part of a fulk narrative or even a Fort Song, blending together traditional customs where it viol with a violent tail of Columbian drug trafficking in the S S and e S. it's simultaneously grounds and elevates the narrative in just this tribal life of the clan and just immersing you in the culture while it still has, you know, this fairly traditional plot elements of drug trafficking and crime. It's really interesting to see this how it opens up just not with not with Mafia activity, not the drug trade, but just a woman's right of passage off that private life of those traditions and the slowly easing in the other elements are of just this gigantic rise and fall. And yes, it does have the gang violence. But it's also interesting what the shoes is to show and focus on, which is rituals, hierarchies, that the cold of tribal honor and how it's respected and broken. I mean it's almost lyrical, with beautiful images washing over you and the idea of dreams and legends merging with reality. It's also stripped...

...bear to the bone, yet colorful and expansive. It's uses elements of poetry, beauty and even minimalism with pure brutality. It can it can be genderingly suspenseful, but also beautiful, with the sense of wonder in all the oakliness and melancholy. It's stuntlingly shop wonderfully director that perfectly restrained and it really creates a fairly unique experience that semal pain, this little beery at full, simple yet complex, ugly yet beautiful. I had quite high hopes for bits of passage because I was a huge fan of guaras previous film in brace the serpent, which channeled a lot of his dogs work and a great wrath of God. Now, bits of passage didn't quite live up to embrase the serpent. As Chris said, it's a familiar character arc but it's placed in an unfamiliar set in and that in itself is a very interesting aspect of the film. It is beautifully shot, the visuals and the Satin, they're all very mesmerizing and it's an engaging storyline, but it didn't quite reach the heights that I was hoping for, but definitely worth checking out if you're interesting or unusual films about the drug trade. It could have just been a scale face in the S in Colombia and that would have been kind of enough for me, but it turned out to be so much more than that's one thing I would add. Should you what you said, Chris, is that it's really has this epic feel of these families battling and get a really uses the different environment they will and it has this this Shakespearean kind of I don't know, read to it if it's grand, if it's like a dis grand tragedy, especially in the way it shots. The colors made me think a hundred to take another Shakespeare d direct she's been another dation this time. But yeah, I felt that's those are passage was a really, really special from actually I think it took this Pretty Basic Pif amidia story and when he made something grand with its. Yeah, I really enjoyed birds of passage, or so I actually think. I liked it more than embrace of the serpent, though that was a very striking film, with the way little shot in black and white. I guess I found the narrative more embrossing and birds of passage just the way that it's trying to be lost, all this epic story of the other start of the legal drug trading Columbia and just the way it expands where from the S S up to the S. thought was really great insight into customed superstitions, beliefs and, like Matthew said, just all the different locations. So we get to see. We get to see the vast desert, the jungles, the urbanized areas. It's just a very engrossing, very sprawling tale and thought most of the actor did a really good job and there I think, from what I was reading at the time, most and more non professionals and they just were did a really good job of it. And it's really sort of like told from the perspective of Columbia's indigenous peoples, which I thought was quite interesting and not something that I've seen all the time in films out there. Well, I don't that incredibly positive, not that don't really not been to refute or fight for it. Or let's all head over to our second favorite film of two thousand eighteen, starting once again, wait at here right. So my number two film is a thing we've discussed at some length on the ICEM FFF episode, so I won't dwell on it too much, and that's Huben bunt. I used to or been bound collector. This is an her gay Hungarian animated film by Middle Had Gustich about a psychiatrists who uses arts to treat his patients but is himself haunted by art related Childhood Traumas. And this is a highst film, essentially, but the plot, the effective is not really the point. The point is the animation, which uses characters in the side of cubist or surrealist paintings, so some have a face. I could also three eyes or the purely two dimensionals, etc. And the whole film has that energy of early twenty century art movements like Dadaism, movements gone, of escaping the horror of World War One, who embracing the absurdity of the world. And it's filled to the brim with Easter eggs and animation is extremely natic, making this an and falling fun ride which also explores the transformative power that art holds over us. I'm also a huge fan of Ruben Brandt. I love how the art world and the realm of psychological trauma collide in this strange, ship Wonderful Hungarian animation, and it's a dazzling highest film and it's...

...heart, which incorporates influences from artists such as Picasso, Dari and Clint to produce it a modern take on the world of fine art. And one thing that is worth mentioning is the inspired pop culture references throughout, in particular their lounge covers of Britney Spears and radio head. They shouldn't really work. It's such a strange algamation of music and animation and although it should be jarring, it's such a unusual, unconventional film and it just works and it tied it together really nicely. And the only thing that add had point out is that the ending doesn't quite satisfy all of the questions raised by the intrigue and storyline, but it's still an unforgettable film that really showcases some impressive animation from some talented artists. Yeah, the animation is definitely high point of Ruben Brown, especially the character designs that both of you have talked about already. Those of the character designs, I don't know. I actually thought they seemed a little bit like horses, the characters, but obviously cross a little bit with a Picasso Painting. Very interesting. My favorite part of the film was the nightmare sequences. so much of the film revolves about the room. It brack character having all these nightmares about painting is coming to life and a taking him. I really love this real element of that, especially when we see really classic paintings there and the characters reaching out and try to grab and smash his space in and there's an especially funny part where it's a painting of a woman with the cat and then the cat goes and sits in a lab and the cat jumps out from a lab and attacks rum and which made sort of like her pussy actually literally coming out and attacking it. So some really interesting touches like that and there, and I do have to say the his office with the aquarium wars and flaws that, you know, absolutely blew my mind of what's amazing animated art direction there. But other than the nightmare sequences, the film didn't really work that well for me. The Detective Investigation Angle felt very by the books for me and there's sort of like a little part where he's chasing after female robber and suddenly breaks into a bit of a sign and so like it was just like a scooby doo episode. And Yeah, none of that really ground me at all, unfortunately. And I also thought for a highest movie it was very short and characterization and the best highst movies, you know, to the characters, like in the oceans films. Order got well and Jeff, where's a Ruben Brown? I just felt amost the patients other than the female one, I thought were very interchangeable. So may not part of it didn't work for NABOR whenever the film was in nightmare mode and then the characters coming out the planning and attacking him. Ever in the film was a nightmare mode. You know, I absolutely loved it. Yeah, I mean I I've already the song the prices of brand collector in the ICMFF episode and it's it's a great work. I'm completely agree with sold that the story is quite lackluster, but this is story is really just an excuse to play around with his style and I think what I call at the time was his titch and loving it. It's a story about archives, with characters essentially looking exactly like pieces of art and just having fun with that, playing with the visual style, and I think it is pulpic and it could easily, with normal animation, even have been a pixar filpy though, something something like the incredibles or, if it was threebrook, something more akin to despicable me. But the arched I really just makes it calm alive and it feels unique because of it, and that's the reason why we were talking about it not really anting else, even though it's it is a fun film, it's a perfectly delightful film, but it's the art style that really makes it great. So soul, what's your second favorite film of Two Thousand and eighteen? Okay, so the film after side of the shows for my second favorite is a film that I recently re watched. It's popped up on movie so actually, no, on same other time this fas it's eded, ifby won't still be streaming there any longer. Look, it's an excellent film. Where you can find that it's called unsane. It's Steven Soderberg Film and, like upgrade, it's a film that I found even more chilling and, I guess, even unsessling upon revision, going the plot, going into it and seeing it unfold. Basically, you've got this unsuspecting woman who goes into a visit at a psychiatrist and she ends up signing some forms that she's told is just general paperwork and she...

...ends up accidentally committing herself to this mental institution. And it's a very interesting film because I was sort of sits well, alongside side effects and contagion, which are other films that Soderberg made. Last decade about the health system and the flaws within it. So it sits well as alongside those, but it's also just a really great thriller. The film does have a few convenient coincidences and even second time around I couldn't quite get my head around but I just found absolutely rivet riveting, right down to the final threes fame, when I first saw it, I saw it when it came out in cinemas and it people don't know, it's a film that Soderberg a shot on an iphone. But as we know from Tangerine, which Sean Baker did, son of the best looking films can be shot at an iphone and the film just looks absolutely a squizz exquisite. Like usual, sort of burk has this great eye or stuper saturated colors and the film looks just as great as that. And when I saw in faters I was sort of like oess, is really cool, because the unusual aspect ratio sort of gave the feeling of being watched and really high on the paranoia. The second time around, when I was rewatching, I was watching going to movie on the APP on my ipad and of course you know iphone film watching the IPAD. Didn't even notice aspect ratio at all, and I don't know if that's more of a testament to watching on the IPAD or just being so immersed in it, but yeah, really didn't bother me at all. I just think the film is got some really interesting and really scary things to say about how the way health systems can operate, incredibly well acted to by clear for and am irving as her mother, and it's just really very I don't know, I would like to say contemporary and films feels like a very applicable to these days and in this ever incimic interconnected world, the way that the film looks at stalking. It's about medical institutions, it's about our annoy it's just about all these different things and I would just found it even more what I'm settling the second time around when I watch it. So I was like, this is a film I'm going to have to put down as my number three for the podcast, and saying is if in my sew in theaters also, and I felt it played really effectively on this very deep, extremely strong fear of not being believed right, of everyone thinking you're you're insane and you're not, and after a point you just can tell who is right, and I think that's really anchored by clear voice performance. For is an actress I really love and I think she's great in this film and it's yet another example of her range. Right, it's not a not the kind of role we've seen her in since all before then? I don't think so. So, yeah, I think I'm saying is a thing that works quite well and I do think the plot is each wonky in some places, it works in the moment is what is important. And Yeah, we would really emphasize clear voice performance as making the film worker. Yeah, this want to say that I just really love the style of this film. I mean, shooting the whole thing on I phone, it's not just impressive, but it really gives you this unnerving angle because characters are not quite shown as you used to when you use regular lenses. It feel a bit like this older digital cameras as well. Like I say, as a demon lover, it's really unsettling just from the start. It feels more raw and the bare bone and it just immediately set you into this atmosphere of an easy even before anything else has gone down. I absolutely agree that clear, for it is great in this and it also belongs, like you mentioned, that you're in this tradition of films which essentially makes us question the nature of reality. I mean we can think back to to, you know, go the fostering flight plan or or the right hardland film, very with spudent and the remake, British remakes so long at the fair, where it just don't exactly know. You think you know, and it also plays just with with you in terms of it's not just that you're watching this person not being sure if she's insane enough, but you're not sure if she's insane or not, and I really enjoy that part of it. I think what did break it down, I won't get into it because it would spoil the film, is that there is an element in the film to me that just was too hard to believe. I thought that one large part of kind of climatic action that kind of tying it all to get a kind of story all together. This was so unbelievable to me that it couldn't reach greatness for me. But aside from that,...

...is really immersive, a matter of experience and I just love the style and it's just an extremely impressive project. I agree with a lot of your comments there, Chris. It's definitely got a really immissive sense to it to their way. That it shot an iphone really adds to their sense of paranoia and one's like you said, and it does start out with quite an eye opening next pers a on their health system and it has a lot to say there. But it does sadly descend into what feels like a bit of a schlocky thriller towards the end. I really like how Mattie described it as the plot goes a bit won key, you know, which it does sadly bring down the enjoyment to the film for me. But I do really enjoy the sense of ambiguity around films that deal with mental hospitals where you're unsure if certain people are actually saying or not. That aspect the film really appeals to me because things like Cookoo's nest shutter island, two, are the greats of the genre, really build on that and that aspect works really well. It just doesn't quite deliver there the final payoff that perhaps you're hoping for from quite a strong build up. Very interesting comments there, Gres, because I didn't actually talk about that much about the Holland sign or not and fear of not being believed. But yeah, that's obviously a very strong element of unsaying and one that sort of Berg handles extremely well. You're not short. First, if she really is just this unstayable, and then the right that she reacts to the other patients and just such a rational ways makes you question, you know, is she really seeing the store or not? It chose of becoming hate one key thriller. I'm not sure about that. I think the thrill an element sort of work for me well because there's a lot of conversations. Without spoiling it too much, towards the end we're get a bit more of a psychological edge or release the for a character gets a bit more of an edge on psychologically, and I thought that was handled very well. It was just maybe some of the cool incidences building up to that that put me off a little bit with it. But I love the way the film ended. As I mentioned before, it ends on a phrase frame which I think is absolutely pitch perfect and, without spoiling you too much, the whole final scene does those so much to me. Our with any sort of trauma or bad experience you can order get over it, but it's always still got a linger there a little bit. So yeah, I just love the film for that and the way it's sort of conveys that. Yeah, we definitely does that really well. Soul and moving on to palm's second favorite film. So my second favorite film of two thousand and eighteen also happens to be matthews number one favorite film two thousand and eighteen. So we've got great taste in coming there. And the film is annihilation. So we look forward to talking about that very soon. That brings me on to my number two which is happy as loss Aido by a list robucker, which is and incre readably difficult film to describe really be almost feels like it's portrayed of a saint with with that degree of gentleness, and I don't really know if there's a better word for it than that, perhaps naivete or innocence, etc. That can just be felt like this gentleness in this character, can this really be felt? Its unsettling and saddening. I think what speaks to me most in happy as Lo sorrow is the extreme contrast between innocence and the real world. I think there is something almost perverse in the visual contrast between the four community of farmers to which lost area belongs. I mean did. This world could almost be believed to be a community at the turn of the of the twenty century, with muted colors, the mixture of realist and romantic exposition and that of the to use a slightly antiquated tern that doesn't really jump that smoothly of the lips anymore. The rulers, with the Marquisa in the castle and perhaps most thoroughly symbolized by young marquis, can create the with his bleached hair, rocked and roll tshirt, skinny deans and this, this gloriously red jacket. It almost feels like an insult to the census, but it becomes something greater than life, especially as we see this socalled friend and ship between Losaido and Dancin di grow. and honestly, it's painful, I mean love. SATOW is entirely subservient and he'll follow any command with just this purity of acceptance, to the point of even drawing...

...his own blood without flinching, always with the same earnestness in his face. It's truly truly painful to watch, and this complete willingness to serve and the complete honesty, and it's incomprehension of anything immoral and in the ability to truly understand the world around him, believing essentially anything he is told. It comes true beautifully. To just give one example at the very beginning, where is taking advantage of by a farmhand tricking him to take his place watching out for the wolves. And it's not even deceiving him properly. He's just tells US sorrow that he doesn't have to worry, he'll come running if it falls out. And when a sortow, here's the rules. He calls out, they calls out and they calls out, but no one comes. And without this rocking his world, you at Ull Oh, it's simply just accepts it and sits down and stays there watching out for the wolves. And I can't really get into all of all this film does without spoiling it, but there's elements of magical realism here which makes the film feel even more unique, an incredible and allows it to study the poverty and the situation of the poor in a much larger way, giving it a power and a punch, and I really think that this film should establish. I'll list rock as was the most intriguing directors working today, as I can't really think of any films that really truly compares to happy, astill side or, unless you want to bring our minds to something like Ressan's, my friend, Balta side. I mean there's really nothing like it and it's a film that days with you, at least day with me for a long time. It's interesting that he mentioned Chris, that you can't think of any films that are similar to happy as Lazaro Beau was one actually sprung tomorrow while I was watching it and watching they not in a good way. Okay, I did likee happy as. Those are a lot. Overall, I thought it was incredibly fascinating his journey and some of the stuff that happens in the second half of the film, which I guess it currently discussed without spoilers. But the film that sprung to mind me was being there, the Peter Sellers film, which was a film that when I first watched, I thought was incredibly funny and then when I really watched that, after watching, after working with autistic children, I realize actually it's not very funny. It's incredibly mean spirited that they're making fun of this spotistic character and with Laz our, I guess I wasn't quite sure if he was meant to be a simpleton or someone who has trouble understanding the outside world, whether it's just benevolent, like nobody else is out there. And most of the readings of Lazarre seemed to say well, yes, he is just incredibly kind and and unkind world and I think that's an amazing dynamic. But just some the stuff in the second half of the film, especially when he gets outside his village, and then, I can say that without too much of a spoiler, just under the experiences. They're just brought to mind being there and thought all this is a character hoping in a world that he doesn't understand and just made a bit uneasier for me. Or wasn't sure if the film was, I guess, similar to the Peter Sellers film, whether it's making fun of him for it. So yeah, I enjoyed it overall. I thought it was well done. I liked the way that I didn't know where I was going at first with the fake kidnapping. I was like, I was an interesting wonder where it's going to go. It can't out on edge the whole time. Yeah, I wasn't sure if there's a bit of a nasty on the current or just the structure of it, which are brought the film being there to mind. I mean, I did distance say I really don't like to being there, and I think it's partially for the same reason. But being there, it's also a bit of a forest dump type of film. Potentially, this character with limited ability goes through this incredible experience and in last sor it's kind of different. It's not good things or that they technically coming to them is essentially more and more twists of faith that turns against him, and I do think that it would say it's kind of a brigrade of I say, they do think that that's where plays. There, with the magical realised elements, began to really get into, but the way it deals with the character, I think it's quite clear that it is does singly Amilt for his unique innocence and it does in a way rewarding for it, but not with the consequences being exactly the best. Without really spoiling anything else, I can certainly see the comparisons to being there. Well, I'd like to draw on it a comparison a bit closer to home with the Italian classic neo realist fantasy miracle in Milan. I feel like it shares a very similar vibe to...

...that film and also focused on it a poverty stricken grouping in Italy, and I feel like the directors channeling a lot of the energy from the film through that reference point. I really enjoyed happiness lets are. It's very quirky and charming drama. As Chris mentioned, there's muted natural colors throughout what it actually works really well in the situation it kind of changed with the presentation of Lazarro in this plane outfit he wears throughout, stripped back so we can just focus on the the same lie nature of the character and I think that the subtle fantastical elements work really well for aroughout the not to darring or overbearing the way it naturally and it's it's really surprised me to learn it part of it was based on it true story, and it's also way of noting that the lead actor was plotted from thousands of hopefuls who never acted in a film before, and I'm going to quit look and IMDB. Not being in anything since and I think it's a really impressive and powerful turn from someone who's moved to featuring so prominently in front of the camera. It's interesting that you bring up or as Amadas are Chris, I haven't seen being there, so I can I can't comment on that's all. They're good in me land for that matter, but I hadn't seen as about as that when I saw that's our feach. But I think the composing is quite telling in what didn't work for me in its because, I mean, it was about desire. You the main character is a donkey, but you also have and Yasm Ski, who is giving a performance right next to it, and I think you are kind of lacking that anchor and happy as as a and other feature. And I also think it's setting that you've been going it too a film, whether man, characterism, animal. You also mentioned you and Tom How saintly that's out is, and that's I have a problem with that. I think the way some stories use people with mental disabilities as being kind of representative of innocence or goodness, you know, it's kind of necessarily centralizing them and making them more into objects than subjects. And Yeah, he's really an object in terms of soy setting. Everything happens to him. He doesn't do anything, and I guess that's okay when it's a donkey. I have more issues when it's a human. I suppose I didn't hate the Sim I think there are some interesting performances in it, especially by ton Credi. I can't really get into that too much, but yeah, I think there's definitely some good things in it. I enjoyed the magical realism of it's what happens in the film. That was being specific, but yeah, I have an issue with that use of the main character. I love how you point out that I'm essentially comparing him to a donkey and that's not really didn't have though. I do think it's characters. They they are actually quite similar in that my friend belts are is also an attempt at a bar trade of a state. There are characters who are treated horribly throughout, and that finishes up all of our peaks for fifth, two, second place and we're finally on to our number one, favorite films of two thousand and eighteen. So we kind of got a preview of what your choice is already, Matt R, but do you want to present on elation and why it stood out to you the way it did so, as some mentioned, my number one is annihilation, and the fame has been compared to stalker for its basic plots of a group of people going into a forbidden place where my serious entity is affecting reality in strange ways. But I feel it's actually closer to another tack of Ski Film, Solar Is, in the way it uses an alien presence to explak character and tackle existential issues. We talked to bits in the space exploration episode about the fact that so many of the greatest science fiction films are thrillers in one way or another, and of course the best out the ones that really succeed at booth, being visual experiences as well as intellectual explorations of SCI FI topics. This is a shining example, exploring, as the title suggests, the notion of self destruction, both on the very personal, intimate level with naturally Boldman's characters and some of the others, but also on the level of life itself, constantly adapting and imitating what's around it, and Garland uses the ideas to create incredible sequences. There are two scenes in this film. They would come amongst my favorite scenes ever. The first one I really talked about in the what scares US episode is the scene with the bear of the they're like thing, which has incorporated human elements in its voice, and that's one of the most terrifying, Boon chilling inventions...

...ever put on screen. And the other one occurs near the end of the film. Let's say it's a confrontation taking place in a lighthouse, and it's still remarkably imaginative sequence, using visual effects to create a scene that's twitting, disturbing and thought for walking or at the same time. Now I don't think the firms perfects some of the characterization for the secondary characters is admittedly a bit shadow that gallons is able to use even those characters in remarkable ways. I'm thinking specifically of there's a Thompson's character and her last scene in the film. It has some roughness around the edges, but delivers more unforgettable, even profound moments that any more other film from this year and bids this ward hoaks quote about a good film being like freeway scenes and no bad ones, and I think an addition is a is a good example of that. That's a wonderful prescription of annihilation by Matthew. There I'm going to cover a lot of the similar ground because I feel just as passionately about this film is as he does. I mean it's in an intelligence and unpredictable science fiction horror centering around a mysterious meteor. It is is landed near and abandoned lighthouse and has a strange effect on the surrounding area, and we are introduced this idea through a team of female scientists and military personnel who head into the strange zone to discover more about what is happening, and they encounter unimaginable horrors along the way. It's visually stunning and often breathtaking science fiction film. Alex Carland is done an exceptional job of translating source novel to the screen, and it culminates in a credibly emotional sequence centered around the lighthouse. Now, it's not quite as revelation or transcendental as the final sequences in, say, two thousand and one, but it comes pretty damn close to that with its strikingly imaginative depiction of the life form that is traveled to Earth with the meteor. Now, I also think that this is a brilliant film anyone who enjoys science fiction horror and wants to take a punt on films that not afraid of trying something different and new with the ideas. It doesn't follow the Trans tested path, which is a great thing. So yeah, I think everyone should check out this film. So I guess I'm the one who has to bring you negativity them, because I'll I did like an alison quite a bit. It also came as a colossal disappointment. After all, the scoreland's last film, x machine, which managed to create does this incredible personal pension and allowed actors to shine on that very tin budget, and an elation, on the other hand, does not let its stars shine at all. I mean it might disagree on this, but out this field, that portmant just it's flat, and Oscar Isaac, who gives such a great performance in Golan's previous film, has no presence whatsoever. That's slightly more excusable given what's happens to his character, but I really think that the level of attention to acting in character here is, I is, almost a kin to a aliens or at were arrested evil film. I think you could, Yo can say it's, you know, starker, and so they aris meets misresident evil because like in terms of characters dialog it's really tin and that that can work really well if you go further all out on style or beauty or mystery or action, etc. But to me at least, an elation felt like kind of from middle ground where it didn't really dip its toes into any of this and it just feels a little bit flat, especially with the framing. It looks really good. It has some great scenes, which Tom and mature mentioned earlier, but as a whole this film is just a relatively good one for me. Very interesting to hear Chris described as a colossal disappointment another people listening can't see the little chat, but I should say Tom's reaction when Chris said that look annihilation to me was a mild disappointment. I do think it's a very good film, but then again, I absolutely loved x Markener and I don't think this one's anywhere near in the same league. What I really liked about anihilation was the whole build up to it. So, like other people have said, it's very toughhome ski and approach there. You know, all the whole mystery of the zone or or whatever they call in the film. I thought once the film started to deliver answers, it actually became a lot less intriguing for me. And I know some of you guys have talked about the characters already, but it's sort of like we're told these people that been volunteering their volunteered for the suicide mission because of these...

...voids in their life. And yet I've found that the SCI fi content was pushed much harder than the character drama, whereas it gets something like so last which is being compared to that, very heavy on the character drama, perhaps even more so than the sci fi content, whereas the sci fi content always gets much more focused and annihilation. But look, I thought it was very well done film. I enjoyed it. I enjoyed the whole mysteries of it. I guess just the way that we was elbrated and acclaimed when it first came out gave me very high expectations, especially coming off a film like x Mahina and then sitting down watching an elation, I thought this is a good film, but it's a film that I thought well, maybe if it was a bit more maybe mysterious spend more time in the builder, maybe a bit more time the characterization. I might have warmed two slightly more. Yeah, I can see what you guys me with a charactors or Christopher the performances. I think the Bodman, it's just Akay actor is very claused off when it's not very expressive. So I performances really understated. It's maybe not some it's not a great performance, I would say, but I think it works fine for what the film requires. However, I would say Jennifer, Jason Lee and Genero Driguez and even just a Thompson then perform so I thought were quite good and it's should have. The characterization is a little shadow it goes a little fast, but again I mentioned that key scene Misterella Thompson would like. I can really describe, but I think you know what I mean and I guess the film and like x macing X, I can that it was visually gorgeous, but a lot of it's required the conversation right to develop the characters. I think garden is trying to be much more visually focused here and again, when I think of those characters I think more of where they go eventually and what happened to them and what that means. I mean, I don't disagree again that that the characterization could maybe have been a little deeper for those the second or characters, but I think he makes it work and again I think those standout scenes really elevate that true degree that I'm willing to forgive some shadowness in that aspects. I would agree with Matthew on that the performances are serviceable and, whilst the not impressive, they do a perfect job of conveying more call and just going for here. The spectacle is in the visual fiece that were presented with rather than the charity development, and I think that works perfectly well in terms of this story. And one thing I forgot to mention. This is the second on that sadly went straight to a netflix release, and it's really frustrating to think that it didn't have the opportunity to view this on the big screen, because I think it would have been perfect to watch it in the cinema. I enjoyed it in my home cinema and my set up got a great set up, but nothing quite conjures up the the magic of seeing it, and I a big cinema screen. So it is disappointing that this seems to be the way that things are going for a lot of filmmakers. Moving forward. Yeah, I can definitely imagine no relation being even stronger on the big screens. Definitely a laugh. It does look great. And moving on to Thall, what's your number one favorite film off two thousand and eighteen? My number one film was already mentioned by Matt Ducause, also his number five, and it's black plansman, spikely film. It's about a black undercover detective who manages to infiltrate Cohu Klux Klan chapter and the s and the film is just a really great mixture of anger, comedies, suspense rules. I mean, spikely is never been known for a subtlety and this isn't as an especially subtle film. But it's not just he is anger at racism and other things going on. It's also mixed with lots of laugh out louder comedy, lots of suspense. And the film's not just about the African American character. It's also about the Jewish please officer who helps be his face when he infiltrates the movement, and it's about him recognizing he his own Jewish roots that he never embraced himself when he is forced to deny them in front of KK came members. So not going on the film. It's very dynamically edited. There's quite a bit of split screen across different angles, but even just some of the way two scenes are cut together. It's very dynamically done. It's got a great music scored by Terence Blanchot that actually finally got him an Oscar nomination. But the one thing, the one thing that really sells the film for me is the ending. And when I saw it in cinemas I...

...was not preferred for what not the you know physical ending where puts down the phone, but the actual part that Lee taps on after his narrative is finished and absolutely devastated me. I left the cinema in years and I thought it was just amazing how, after, you know, Spike Lee had kept me laughing out loud pretty much for two hours, he managed to emotionally shatter me also and just leave me in such a day's afterwards. And I was a bit nervous going in and rewatching the film, and I did rewatch it for the podcast because a lot of people were playing at the time or what? Such a dated ending and you know it's not going to have the same I am effect, you know, and trump is no longer at office and I just rewatched and the ending was still in probably powerful for me, just the footage that spike Lee managers to put together, the way he cuts together. It's only a few minutes long. It might even be less than two minutes. One would all the clips he puts together just makes you really consider the fact that even though his film is set in the then he's on the stuff to do with racism and way different institutions like the Kkke a still range to exist, that it's still a part of society to day. This is a film that's said in the past, but one that also recognizes that certain problems of the past are still problems of today. Yes, obviously black kinsmen is also a FEMA. Loved it was making number five, and I think it's remarkable achievement on spike Lee's part that he manages to do to balance these stuns right these to make a comedy about the GAK is just such a difficult exercise and I think I will agree with this sort on the score. In particular the turns Bend Shot Score, I think is amazing, in really key in maintaining that balance and as well as the central performance John David Washington. I think his performs him like endsman is one of the best performance in recent years in terms of the lead performance. He's effortlessly going from well, he's almost always in a comedic style, the that you always keep that kind of identities struggle behind it as a cop in this in this context, and I think he's absolutely brilliant and I'm driver is is great. As when about the ending, I'm not a shooter fan of it a soul. I generally dislike when historical films end with and then this happened or all. They kind of Shaw reality in your face. But I think in this specific case it it works. It's not what I love about the FIM. I think it works precisely because of that command of tone that's likely has throughout the film. It feeds back an appropriate button to this film that is both about visicarizing the KKK as a bunch of idiots but also showing that even the Vunch of idiots can be very dangerous. That I think. I think the own hitting I'll disagree with the in terms of what you guys said is that I don't really think s likely managed to balance the styles as well as he could have. You have several kind of tie INS with blackloitation. At the time we kind of switches up the style. Those things are really fun and they stand out, but they don't really match that well with the rest of the film. That I agree completely with. The performances. They're strong. It's a pump of fun film and in Nervingly Fun Film. I really like the kind of Home Panther and I also really think that won't party did not mention well the way that hope for grade but raised David Do, which is this which is as essentially with a bumbling the food with a lot of self confidence, and I think it works really well that they namic on the fall and in real life works. That for relationship between Dun David Washington and over graates is one of my favorite parts of the film. I think some of the other elements are a little bit lack luster. About the it's a very enjoyable film. I also really enjoyed the film. As so mentioned, Spike Lee isn't known for his subtlety. And it's very blunt social commentary about law enforcement and racism in the use of USA. But it still manages to be an exceptional crime drama and it still manages to be incredibly funny and it's impressive that Lee manages to balance those tones quite while. I agree that John David Washington is excellent and the lead and Adam driver is also brilliant as his partner in the undercover operation. Now lots has been said about the ending and I agree that it's a total surprise and and quite jarring. And sometimes endings like this do you feel like cheat tactics to manipulate the audience's emotions. Though it does feel quite fit in...

...here and it hits particularly hard and you know, I feel like it's it's a fitting ending that really helps to get these message across. So yeah, really enjoyed this film and the cooking. I'd like to add, Chris, on what you said managing different styles. One thing that spike it does hear that I think is remarkable is the way he uses birth of a nation, you know, the the silent film that was used as equipment add this inentury by the KKKA, and the way he shows that that the game members are watching it and then he uses the editing techniques that are famously used in the birth of a nation to kind of show both the black and well white farmacists communities and to make a powder there. That is very bold, I think, because it's clear that these are not the same things, but there are also commonalities. That's what I really like that it is blunts but it is not simplistic and I think that's that's montage, that that's moment of editing is is really a great moment in the fam yeah, I do have to agree with Matthew. That's probably one of my favorite arm edited sequences. They're ust, you know, John David Washington watching with such horror as face the birth of a nation in the cutting against the black folks talking about the history, and yeah, that's definitely a very powerful part of it. I also agree with Chris About the twelve for grace scenes or the telephone conversations. Those were definitely very well handled and even Ross type of rice. The first time I watched the film it was only afterwards one looked at out her even realize because of, I guess, by COPM is, the scene in that so many show but I thought he now the performance there. I probably agree with Chris about the black waitations star. I'm not a big fan of exploitation cinema and I would so probably those parts towards the beginning and the work so well for me, but I thought the part towards the end it. I thought that was incredibly well done. In general years a lot of different times and styles going on, but I guess it just really worked for me. So we've made it here. We are. My favorite film of two thousand and eighteen and it goes to gasper. Now. He's excellent film climax. Now, the first time I watched climax left me feeling like I just come back from the most disturbing headistic weekend my life, but I'd only been to the cinema. It was intense and hypnotic and sickening and everything that you could want from a gasper. Now a film now climax and folds close to real time and follows a dance troupe who's night of parting to secluded location tins into a devastating nightmare when they're Sangi is laced with hallucinatory drugs. There's a striking one shot dance routine at the start, which is utterly mesmerizing, with the choreography and camera work working in perfect harmony with the entrancing music. Now is right now for his transgressive cinema and continues to push boundaries from his challenging films that are not for the screen. FAMISH and twisted in graphic violence, in climax is incredibly memorable and paints a lurid picture of the most extreme group fueled party imaginable. It's the kind of film that leaves you absolutely reeling and stunned with the direction it takes, and this is the kind of reaction I cherish the most when it count in a new favorite film. I mean I really enjoyed climax. I mean it just missed out on being in my personal ton and I just love the way know just shoots his films. Really a completely agree with what they're talking about. The decadence is feeling dirty, because he really just draws you in on this dance or in in this essentially this desolate one compound. It really is a single location filming so many ways. It just makes it feel so large, so alive, and when he goes into that final shot which I think is about forty plus minutes long. It just becomes totally nerving trip into complete madness in a way that we rarely see. So it's just absolutely spectacular work really. I also really enjoyed climax. I thought it was really interesting and very creative, and what I found especially in traguing about it is that it's been labeled as a horror film and it's not really one on a traditional sense, but actually thought it worked very nicely as a bit of an alternative take on the zombieism. So you've got these characters who just continue to instinctively dance or others lose control of their faculties and sort of a bit like a guest from a row's dawn on the dead, except, you know, saiding like a party or whatever, just keep going on. The...

...instincts even when the drugs take cold everything goes out of control. The camera work is absolutely amazing, constantly circling overhead of the characters, camera gradually turning upside down to mirror the effects of their drugs. It's just an absolutely breathtaking film to look at and film tribes, even going as far as film credits, they're all turned on its head by knowing in during the course of the film. So yeah, no, I absolutely love climax. I thought it was very good and I was very excited when Tom said earlier on that it was his number one film for two thousand and eighteen right. So I'm going to be the outlayer here. I mean there's no denying just Bao is a remarkable visuals toighte and stylist. I wasn't as impests by the first dance long take as many, like Tom, were, but maybe because I had heard of it before. And I still did enjoy two lots and found that noise long takes genuinely they had immersing you in this environment as it goes more and more crostrophobic and when things they've Alve into this, you know, ultimates bad trip. I am, however, troubled by the content here. It seems kind of reactionary in the way that it punishes hedonistic characters for, you know, enjoying life to extreme degrees. Now, I don't think that's necessarily the intent and that doesn't really seem like noise thing, but it's like a statement that it maybe life is worth living to its fullest, even if the consequences are dire. But that's not how it comes off to me, especially because it's framed in this horror genre that is often conservative, or at least in slashes. That that's what made me think of any way. Of course, if you bring up zone Zoe seems and novel, it goes in a different direction. But I guess that stop the Vibe I got. And another thing I found troubling, and I don't I would hope it's not on purpose, but basically all the violence committed in this film is committed by black people and all most of them, most of it on white people. And like the most shocking moment of the film is black person committing radiance and on white person. I I don't think, no, I intended that, but I couldn't escape it. I guess because he has such a diverse group of dancers and I guess, yeah, it seems crazy to me that he didn't notice that he was doing that and the whole thing it's made me uncomfortable in ways that I don't think was intended, even though I can certainly appreciate the the artistry and the technical achievement of it. He makes some very interesting points, then that Ta and even considered that about a violence, suppose, because you know, every time I watch I just become so messed in the film that that kind of thing doesn't jump out to me or strike me. Is, you know, something so noticeable. Another thing I thought was interesting was how you said it's, you know, about living life to the fullest and the heading mystic style. I would see it more as kind of a cautionary tale behind it. You know, I would say that it's, you know, relates the dangers of these kind of substances to people in a way that is kind of very blunt and obvious, and so it's interesting that we have different perspectives on that. But I think I was more drawn to the film for its incredible visuals, wonderful soundtrack and vivid horrors than the kind of social commentary aspects that perhaps you've uncoveraged during your viewing off it. Now I think I agree with you. You're take that it's a questionary table, but I guess I don't really like that. I guess, I mean you shouldn't do like super had drugs all the time, but I guess I don't need guess bad the way to make. I don't know how do you call them? The ad don't, don't do drugs. I don't know. Yeah, if this three from madness of twin, they didn't. I'm sure that's so funny, Chris, but I don't have that reference. Sorry, re from Maders, you know the film about the dangers of more on the IT. But but no, I mean I completely didn't notice some of the things you brought up. My do that's there. For that lie some potential things I could harm a re Wakship if that seems alarming anyway the way, I wouldn't expect that to be nos intention at. For me, I think what really worked there is just that trip into extreme madness and paranoia I think he captured so well with his colors in his camera. And there's the way he creates horror. It is bought unusual and again unnerving. So I think this is a very visceral film for me, not really a film with that much focused on character or content. Is just that the visceral experience off leading into a truly truly U and insane world. And if it has the message of kids don't do drugs, I mean I don't really mind too much. So, Chrish, I'd love to hear to your favorite film with she fousand in nature. Thanks,...

Tom So. I'm actually really excited as truly, I do not care if you go down history as barbarians by all the you that it is the kind of cinema I'm really hardwired the love. I mean, how could I not? I don't look at ourt is, after all, my favorite director, and this has so many similarities to what I love about good art, from the multilayed commentary comedy to Social Dissection, coded and sarcasm, just an overabundance of Meta. That that this characters observing sweets, there's the camera shooting screens and TV's. It just and playing with the call on text of what is and isn't real. I mean it truly has it on, just served right up on a clatter as this kind of extreme wonder of brickity and imagination. I just love it. So let's just immerse you in this experience of seeing it. We start with a recorded court session, the setting the stage inside a TV, with a kid stamp letting us know that just the context of fascism and for right nationalism, and then the lead actress introduces ourselves. She mentions her co stars and starts exploring the similarities and the differences between herself and her character, all in a major, proper room with guns and uniforms around her. It is place with this met the reality is so much and it has a lot of fun with it. But I'm not sure if everyone will find as amusing as me. But just the idea of a director making a film about Romainia as fascist passed by, following our director staging a play about Romania's fascist passed and then just letting us rest in this kind of purgatory of its execution. It's just immediately appealing to me, and this is where, just did this type of bracktanism becomes both entertaining and revealing. So yes, the film actively engagous in how Romania is not face is its own history and fuses to engage in acknowledge it's past. And we get long lists of letters, facts, accounts, including the nutzis actually finding the remainings too extreme and eager to murder use. But it does this beyond a second layer, so to just to look at one scene where they decide which hateful banner to essentially display above the hang bodies of the victims of the massacre and Nodessa. They read out all of these horrifying, horrifying slogans off that time and you just hear this more banal exchange between the production where they is choose not to go with certain slogans because differ, instance, just too long. But by doing this, you know, we are exposed to all off the slogans if we just get this much greater image of what is happening. And second, and this is where just the humor and darkly comedic elements come into play, we see the disagreements on set. We see the discussions that happened, from participates being furious at the place and the Romanian including shouting hate speech or dubious speech, to this charming micheviest devil character. It is leecy bureaucrat which just eager to censor the play and just spouting of any what about this? Them arguments in the book. And by the time we then get to the ending with the play starting, you have heard all of the arguments against it, at least quite a few of them, and you've seen the awkward it changes. You have even gotten distance from all of this by seeing the flaws and messiness of the director's own life to the point that it doesn't actually feel preachy. You are adequately detached. And let me just say that when it flows into the play, it feels real, painstakingly real. Even the camera work changes. It's like you're watching a real play, and that's what makes especially the reactions of the audience, which I can't really get into without spoiling you too much, just so unsettling and horrifying. So I really think that I do not care if you go down in history as barbarians. It's just this extream immersive, almost this beautifully breath breathing and film that this has everything. I love it delivered it up, but it's also a really important film because it really assault this selective Amnisia and it really dives into what is increasingly dangerous today, which is just the emergence of this kind of for right nationalism. So I really just think it hits everything at once and which is what made it...

...my favorite film of two thousand and eighteen. Also, they love the shame, so basically agree with everything wish I said. So I will say that the charming devil I did not find so charming. I thought the conversation between him and the main charactor was a great example of how what about is m is like this truck to which all we call device. Oh Yeah, and it just kills all discussion, basically, and I thought as well as all you said about the boating aspects and I didn't think of good ar but you're definitely right the whole discussions on memory and what is it to memorialize something. I wasn think it's work. It worked quite well as a character is. I think the the central character played by you and the Yaco is a very interesting character and of this woman who has to deal with this whole mediu right and sexual harassments of all it is. I think that's also worked quite well on this level. So yeah, from I really love but I do not care if we go down in history as barbarians. was a very unusual film. Absolutely love the title, by the way. I think that's a brilliant title for a film. It didn't reason it be as much as it did with Chris or Matty. I'll learned a lot from it. There remaining culture and history. That was fascinating to find out about it, because the things in the film that I had no idea about. One thing that was quite difficult for me was to understand the stance of the director certain parts, because there's so many meter metal elements going on. You're not sure who he's poking fun out here, whether it's their people are ignorant in the past, the people are acting superior because they're embrace in the past, and there's just a lot of things going on there aren't quite clear to me now. The ending was probably my favorite part. They're re enactment of the past and it kind of brought out these images of the film waiting for government by Christopher guest. Now, although this isn't a mockumentary, it kind of had that playful sense to it towards the end and I did enjoy that. So it was a fascinating watch, but not one that would consider among my favorites of the year. Other that's perfectly fair time and for my part, this kind of way that it kind of pokes from, that everybody involved. That that's the type of extra attachment that I think really worked there, because what makes people think it's less preachy, because everyone is essentially put beer. But then you get that final climax and I think it's it's really eager to discuss this history, but also discussed the reaction and, given where room mania is right now in terms of the political landscape as well, I think what it really does is hold up a mirror to this society and it was to see if people are comfortable with what they're seeing, and I did. For me, I think it does it really, really well. It definitely does do that very well, Chris, and it does make it uncomfortable when you think back to it, because obviously it's quite a humorous situation that is presented, but then again, where an acting kind of a place in our reaction, as the audience at the Ayre acting out of fair line with a reaction. So it kind of plays on that and it makes you feel quite uncomfortable when you consider what the situation and what you kind of finding a music. So it is very interesting film. So I think that's a that's a great way to recommend the film topic because it feel really hasn't gotten the exposure that it deserves. So I hope that any were listening to this will be tempted to get around to it. Well. Yes, it's definitely is interesting hearing both of you discuss the I do not care film because wearing. Chris gave us is list of top five films the year, and I was looking at which one's I was going to watch. I was going or a half hour film in Romanian. I don't know if I'm gonna put that on my watch list, but there is definitely something that I will try and prioritize now. Really great to hear. That's all. I'll count that as a success and on that note, thank you so much for listening everyone. I remember looking too. I see I'm fromcom right now, and just share your favorite films from two thousand and eighteen. Tell us if you agree or disagree with our choices and why. And Yeah, hit us up, let us know. So thank you all for listening and doing us against you and you have been listening to talking images, the official podcast of ICM FORUMCOM.

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