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Talking Images

Episode 47 · 3 months ago

Best Films of 2017, Part I (Our Top 10-3s)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Are your favourites mentioned? What are the most glaring omissions? Will we convince you to watch some 2017 films you still haven't seen? Join in as Clem, Matthieu, Tom, Sol and Chris break down their favourite films of 2017. 

You are listening to talking images, the official podcast of ICM Forumcom. Welcome back everyone. I'm Chris, and this episode, Clem mature soul and I will be counting down our five to ten favorite films of two thousand and seventeen. First, each of us will quickly go through our ten to sixth place at lightning speed, and then the main event, our top fives. We will open each film up to the panel for further discussion. The structure is simple. We will go in a circle where each of us presents our fifth choice. Then, once are all done, we move on to our four choice, third, second and finally our number one personal favorite film of two thousand and seventeen. If a film happens to be a multiple lists will skip it for the lower spots and allow the person who loved it the most to present it. This is also because, as I were, low for the film grows, they will get more focus and more time. However, this is possibly our personal best, as there are only two single overlaps. So, with that all out of the way, let's just jump right into it. CLEM, kick us off. What are your favorite films that just missed out of your top five? Hey, everyone's is clem okay. So from ten to six, we have at no Buttin Sarah plays were world. At number nine, we have a Chinese documentary, Mrs Fang, at Number Eight. We have the killing of a sacred year. That's number seven. We have the documentary in praise of nothing, and that's number six, barely missing. We have the Chinese animation film as a Nice Day at potimate. Your okay. Well, I've got the Israeli Film Fox hots, know, this drama about a family learning their son has died in military service, and then it kind of goes into a very different direction, very Greek style direction, and a lot of different tunes in there. Then don't Kirk. I don't think there's much need to present that. So I think it one loose know that film, and then atomic blond film that I don't know. I don't get the delve for John Week, when this exists and it has an actually charismatic actor at the center and like a new leaves. Anyway, then I'll get Itonia, the Margo Hobby film about the Ice Skating Scandal, and then obscurity with Micaela, which is a documentary about Congolese guy who has to sell charcoal and has to kind of carry this Tarcol to the city. It's very, very affecting documentary. I really recommended if you can confind it, and so all R it's so from Australia in that helps well. or Put rubbon, Austlin's the square. Here is palm or winning film about a here write of your museum or glory and they basically put out an ad which is really in terrible taste and he has to apologize for it, something which he didn't do. And yet he won't apologize for something which is his faults. As a few different interesting dynamics going on there. In Ninth Spot I put the shape of water, the GERMO adult Toro film, basically a love letter to the s UPP monster movies, but that probably doesn't need introduction either. In a spot I put good time, great film from the softy brothers with a whole lot of knee and on there, which absolutely love. I love films are really bathe and Neon. In cetain spot I've got baby driver, the Agar right film, probably doesn't even much of an induction either. And in sixth spot I've got the endless, a great film about an abuse of cult with a bit of a sci Fi twist. It's probably, I'd say, pretty much everything that midsummer should have been. So if you haven't seen the endless I recommend checking it out and, without giving away too much, at least one of those five films will crop up later on in the podcast. Very good. And on my number dad we have Darren O Nolski's mother, which is does, an incredible sensory experience of maddening proportions. And my number nine is the floor of the projects by Sean Baker, which is just yet another incredible mistrial experience here, balanced with getting the heartbreaking, even the incrastness. What's striking is that the captures the world of powdering through this the sense of childhood playfulness which it hits you really hard. My number eight is a ghost story which, just to do spoiled, we will talk about a little bit later on. The seventh place, like saw, they also have the square by Ruben US blond which is a nerving, awkward and are is at are of the art world, diving deep into the pretensions, prejudices and securities of this self absorbed museum curator, and it has all the Dyna makes that...

...soul just mentioned. And on sixth place, it's a film I'm really sorry I couldn't include in my top five, which is Mrs Fang, which is this unnerving and pleasant, claustrophobic and just emotionally challenging documentary by being whang, where we simply watch Mrs Fang and all the woman who can no longer speak or move, the slowly slipping away. The family is around her, discussing her debt, drinking and even partying by her bedside, and just all of this are the knowledge that this woman is actually alive and conscious, but we are left studying your eyes looking for any kind of emotion. It's just so incredibly painful in these moments when the camera actually focuses on her face. It's just lingers there and it can really feels earned. So this is the film I would love to discuss more with you, but I had to make some cuts and with that we're actually arm to clams fifth favorite film after the seventeen list. Take it away, climb. Okay, so at number five I have the movie good time by the safety brothers. The film is about the story of two brothers, one played by Robert Pattinson and his brother who has a mental NDICAP. The film focuses on all but Patterson character struggling to go through one night as he tried to get his brother out of trouble, the brothers that he got in trouble when they robbed the bank and it went wrong, and we follow him through a night meeting different gallery of character trying to make the best out of situation as best as he can, often with disastrous results for him and for those around him. The main strength of the film, as soul briefly mentioned it, is the visuals, the neon drenched visuals throughout the night, where he is indoors or outdoors. You can you see him in apartments, you see him outside and different location and there is always this dark red neon atmosphere that really gives the film a great look. As I said, main character is bigger hold of Pattinson, who does a pretty good job as well showing that well he was able to to distance himself from the twilight movies made a decade ago and by putting on this film and a few as the films that have absolutely nothing to do with playing a vampire, as he did earlier on, he shows in this film. That what he can act and yeah, it's hard to talk about it too much without boiling. But I will add that it's one of those films that just grabbed me from the from the beginning and just keep me booked from beginning to end. So yeah, that's my number five. I absolutely love good time, as you can probably guess because I had it in my top ten. I agree with everything that Clement said about, especially Robert Patterson's performance, and it's a really great performance because it's a role that constantly requires him to manipulate, convince and buck all others around him, so he's always playing an extra character beyond the character that he is as it tries to get his brother in the safety. In terms of the visuals and the audio of the film, I don't know if Claire mentionally turn dream, dreamstop houseting score, but the music is just, as you know, effective for me as the visuals with it. But the main takeawrade, that I took of it after watching it, as I described it as being a more serious after hours as directed by Nicholas Winding raife and and it's just amazing to look at or the kneel and they're like Clem said, almost every single shot there has got some me and in there. So the esthetics are just amazing and it just works really well to create this powerful tail of these brothers who sort of get pushed down this rabbit hole after their plans, robber bat, doesn't quite go to plan. And I remember when I was discussing the after our stuff on the ICM farm afterwards, I said it's just amazing our similar it is. And apparently it's not an accident because one of the posters for the film, which Carmel, one of our users on the forum, showing me, is actually starred on the after hours poster. So it's been of like a love letter, I guess, to the man Scott Stacy film or so, and after hours is actually my favorite Scor sazy film. So yeah, I just absolutely love good time.

Yeah, I was thinking about after hours, after good time through and it works so well. pappens in this absolutely incredible and it did, the intensity offered and just how unlikable yet interesting intriguing pattern meagers is to make this character. It's unlike most, let's say relative and mainstream film. Felt that I think it was grouping the spot up and enjoyed the esthetic of good time but any times I found it to bits exhausting, which I guess is a feature not about, but I guess I couldn't hold on to it. I didn't find Pattinson. He wasn't bad but, as I suppose, I didn't quite empathize with his character enough. I like the film best when it's slowed down the bits, with that scene with the girl when he staying at the girl's house. Tyer webster is a because so that's my favorite seen in the film. But yeah, I had a bit of trouble really really emotionally engaging with it as she was. I've got a question for your Matthew, if you don't mind. So you said you've found good time really exhausting. I actually had the same reaction with uncut gems, and I can't remember off hand if you participate any podcast where we discussed on cart gems, but I gare play was. Wasn't quite against it, but I definitely for how a lot against good time and I just found it, yeah, absolutely exhausting at the end of every as good time I was in trall right until the end. Yeah, and Good James is definitely exhausting, but I do, I do like that film. That's why I highlight the kind of emotional engagement. I think the structure of Uncle James is something for some reason I really responded more positively to. Maybe I just Adam Sandler is is was better shooted for me for this kind of role than Pattinson. I don't know. But yeah, I did like a good James, but it's definitely the same. Yeah, definitely even more exhausting possible. So, Muti, what's your number five of the air? My number five is Knie. Usually just means or so help me God. Documentary by Benjim, filmmakers you know, and John N boom, and the latter of whom is mostly known for a cult docu series from the s called structies, which explode the underbelly of Belgian society in humorous but also sometimes very dark manner, showing US taboo and uncomfortable things that no one else would, at least not on TV, and this documentary is very much in that vein. What it adds, though, is a focus through its main character. We are following a judge in persons who has a very peculiar personality. She's bit of an Oddball, but a very endeering one. She's both passionate towards the people who come before her but also capable of recognizing the absurdity in some situations and that cutting right to the chase, and so she's perfect for this disapproached the dock series, which always verged on feeling exploitative, but this to me, avoid that trouble thanks to that focus on this judge, who brings her warmth and humanity and humor to all of these situations, makes us feel directly involved rather than passively observing these sometimes strange and wacky people, and it's all very enjoying and often funny. Again, exploring some of those taboos, like the lives of sex workers, with light touch, before the film takes a real turn for something much, much darker. And that's what I find great in this film, the unlikely balance of tones, that capacity to look at all the complexity of society and finding ways to show both the absurdist and funny aspects of it as well as the grim and howifiing it. So help me all this is the definitely a film I really enjoyed watching and, as you say, the judge has just the incredible charisma there. I mean she's delightful in many ways, though I do have a bit split opinion on it. I'm just not sure how professional she's actually coming across, because she's actually mocking many of the people coming here Inter office a little bit like a slightly more lovable their duty in a way, which is just the shooting off at every single person, which there with bitter off the cup, politically correct, the remarks which which are firmly and then the stretches are that, you know, we see her driving around in her in a cute little car and she has this like bubbly persona. It's a really nice watch. It has lots of great exchanges. I think some elements of it are light there. They mix in this criminal case which they don't really complete and it feels like it might have been shot over a relatively short period of time and assembled together. It's not necessarily that cinematic, or some part of it do feel a cinematic and I think it's really just carried by her personality. Another thing that made me a little bit on that suit it is that I'm not sure how much everyone's actually acting for a camera and how much is semi faith it was one of those things I was thinking throughout as well. But it's an absolutely delightful filed my I would recommend to pretty much anyone who enjoys this type of documentary. Yeah, absolutely, it was a sh and documentary to watch.

I didn't know those who made it were the one who made the script is back in the S, but it doesn't doesn't really surprise me. Also, I am not I haven't seen many script is episodes. I noticed that it was about the same, this way of showing things without truly commenting on them, from what I remember, as as was said before, the judge as an eccentric personality, let's say. I guess it's a way for her to, or so cope with the hard things she is dealing within this on a day to day basis. And Yeah, I also agree with you, as you matured this capacity, that the film has to go from minor crimes, that say, to bigger cases that include things that happened ten or fifteen years ago, was quite quite something. I also wondered if you would explain the the play on word on the French title. I guess you didn't because you wanted to keep her keep it familiar. Friendly, but the other I wonder if you would do it. And Yeah, I guess the title is actually I mean it's funny. It's usually s means. It's a plain word and on a feminist slogan from the S, I think, which was good. This SUMIS men means neither or nor a submissive, and so this title means neither a judge, no submissive. But I don't know, it's a funny title, but I don't know that it makes that much sense with the film. I mean it's just kind of a funny play on words. And just to get back on something Chris said, yeah, I didn't find myself one doing too much about to reality. Any time there's a camera people might be, you know, overplaying things, but I guess from larity with the Docu series, mean that's you see, they are really weird people who just don't care about being weird. So I guess I took it for granted. But yeah, I don't know. So. So what's your Fr favorite film of two thousand and Seventeen? So I really don't like Guy Madden. I've seen a few of his films and shorts over the years and I've never managed to connect with them. So it's much to my surprise that the film which I'm putting in as fit for this podcast is actually a film by Guy Maddener. It's a film called the green fog and just some history about it, it was commissioned by the San Francisco Film Society for the s anniversary of the San Francisco International Film Festival and I asked Guy and madden to do it, as well as the Johnson brothers who worked with him on the forbidden rumor. And knowing that going down and sitting down and watch the get I watched the film with a lot of trepidation. The thing which intrigued me about it is that from what I had read, it was a tribute to Vertigo, and I absolutely love Vertigo. It's my favorite hitchhock film. I've seen it seven or eight times. So that intrigued me and made this silently about we will give the film ago. What I didn't realize, though, is the film isn't just a tribute to Vertigo. It's actually pretty much a remake of Vertigo. And what they've done it is they've taken all this footage from various films that have been shot in Sana Francisco over the years, so dating back all the way to the night in s up until more recent films, and they've splice different scenes together and effectively have recreated the story of Vertigo. The first, I think fifteen minutes of it from memory is without any dialogs. When the dialog with the people about to speak, madden cuts that part out, but then as the film progresses along, We actually see bits of dialog. As per the title, there is some Green Frog effects used to sort of give it a little bit of extra atmosphere, I guess maybe. But what's really interesting is there's so many people seen from Vertigo that he just seems superbly recreated just by using similar shots from other films and sertle reaction shots. There's all these clips from films with Chuck Norris in it and he gives an amazing performance, or at least in the green fog, the way it edits together, with all the sorrow and regret he seems to have. It's a performance. It's almost as good as James Stewart's in the original. It's just a matter of the way of their material was spliced together and I look it does get a bit confusing, but the more you watch, the more you get used to. Things changed between color and black and white and the whole way. The bill I was seeing at the industry cright. It's just absolutely mind blowing. So I didn't totally love the green fog. I do have some minor problems whether but it's a film that's just ever since I watched it. It's a film that's constably being in the back of my mind, shaking my thoughts and I just can't get the film out of my head, so to sade. Look, I do need to talk about it for this podcast. I don't know'm other people who are fans of URDAGO would check it out in if they're not fans of going mad, and because I'm not a Mann Fan and I absolutely loved it. That's the guess. That is the trade of...

...fair because I am mad and fan, a really big mad and fan, and this is probably my least favorite feature work he's ever done. That it take. It does speak to just how different it is from everything else. I mean he's traditional style of, you know, creating this never world using conventions of real silent and early sounds cinema. It's just not here. This is, like you said, a compilation of scenes all around San Francisco to recreate word ago. It's good, it's a pleasant viewing, but it just feels so light from madden and just this green folky effect just pearing in there. I just don't see the whole purpose of this. It didn't really speak to me in any way. It's just rough, MES relatively cute experiment and that's it. The Green Shug is a show my liked. I found it extremely impressive to be able to take parts of films from here and there to just manage to recreate the vertical story. I thought that was quite an impressive achievement. Wondering something, since you guys, Chris and soul have different opinion on Maddin, to say the releast. The thing with the green fog is that it doesn't feature any material actually from Medine. Medine didn't direct any of the film that were used for the movie, so I guess that's probably why I have personally, I have trouble calling it a guide. Madden film obviously made it, but I don't know. We just took parts and, you know, pieces of others work to create something just like another film that was released a few few years back called final film. I think it's also word pointing out that the man did not direct this alone. Does that's really previous film to Evan Dnson and and going Johnson, two brothers are call directing and unlike the previous film, they're actually credit that the first. So you can also wonder how much of the film is Adams. Whatever the case, maybe it is an editing job, not to directing job, but still, you know there is still obviously someone making it. I had a bit of a weird experience with leaving frog, because I like to know the least about films before them. In this case it might have been a disservice because so obviously I got that it was a venture films filmed in San Francisco. And then about ten minutes and I went, weird, we haven't seen any images from actual vertigo. And then I went, Oh, there are a lot of things that look a lot like scenes from Vertigo. That's weird. But I don't think I exactly put it together, especially because then we get the Catatonia part with check nois, which I agree, saw great performance by check noise, amazing, definitely the best part of the film for me. But yes, so I was more I was kind of trying to find the plots that was not vertical in there. So with the green fog I thought, oh, yeah, the green fog is making people mute, because you have all of these dayock scenes where you know it's cuts before they speak every time, which is a kind of funny. So yeah, I had trouble with him just, I think, because I didn't quite recognize what it was. I recognize all of the Vertigo or marsh but I thought he was doing maybe something else. So yeah, it's an interesting experiment, not one that entirely worked for me, but maybe I can visit it one day after I watched the Togo, which is the thing I absolutely know. Yeah, it's definitely quite dear for what Guy Madden's doing there. The Johnson brothers. I did not like the FIR bit in room, which is the other film that Mat I did with the Johnson brothers. So I don't know if it's a matter of the Johnson's having extreme port because absolutely hid the forbidden room. So I'm not sure. In terms of whether it's directing or editing, I think there is some directing in there. I mean, yes, they need to edit all the footage together, but it's edited together where they specific purpose in mind and there's actually a narrative beyond it. And films that do that it's all like take different clips from other films I just think are incredibly interesting. The director of the artist did one in the nineties called the class America on, but he did that with or different clips from films from like the S and s s and managed to create a narrative out of it by splicing it together and putting some voiceover on. And of course woody Allen did that with what's up tiger lily and record a different voice over to make his own film. But just the whole idea of taking footage and being able to create something with it even if you haven't shot it, is just something which is so dynamic. Is a great director, Cord Craig Boldwin made a couple of films. One of them is called Tribulation Ninety nine alien nominalies under America, and the other ones called specters of the spectrum, and they tell like complete stories just using...

...various found footage and splicing it together. And I guess what I found even more dynamic with the green fog is it's not just splicing together as footge to create a story, but to retell a story that most of us, as hardcore cinephiles, know very well. So it's like seeing like one of my favorite dreams or whatever unfold again in different eyes. So yeah, I don't know, I mean I can I know it's not for everyone and I think, yeah, if you go into it knowing nothing about it, would probably like it even less. I guess I was fortunate enough to know that it was about Vertigo before going in. I just don't know. It was a remake of it. I was just totally surprised and knocked off my faith by it and I thought, of all, this is just a film that I have to put forward and try get some more people converted into watching. Talk to that, because I'm again, yeah, that's it's a come to favorite in front. And the thing that I really like, I think, generally his technique and lends itself to comedy, particularly when, and I think that's why the parts are like the most in the green frog, where again the checknal, his spouts and the kind of awkward, absurd discomedy of people getting interrupted all the time, kind of a Benu air field to it almost one thing I don't to mention for people who like this kind of thing is there's a youtube channel called blow up and it's a French thing, but they have a playlist cond Hecut, which is exactly this be cutting the things from different films and kind of sitting small. So his it's not as ambitious as the Green Frog, but you know, it could be of interest and I'll just throw in defense for people who read it, feels because this is a standard part of documentary filmmaking, an essay filmmaking as well, and you can exercise a great degree of artistic control with that. I mean just look at the films off Adam dirt this for instance, and several documentaries throughout the ages. So I think that you can still definitely call some of the director for finding interesting and exciting new ways to reuse old my thea a real to move it on to my number five, we have the killing of a sacred there by your goals Lumptimos, which is everything you can expect from a lumptimost films, especially at this point in time. I mean it's called clinical, brutal and, of course, unnervingly stylized. The acting is called and Dead Pan, the bleak, almost real humor we know from dog to it and the lobster is here. But, fittingly, as this is a lot of hospital and clinical work, it is far more clinical in its darkness, not to mention far more restrained. It creeps under your skin with its warped logic and takes it to unyieldingly dark and uncomfortable places as this, this family is take into the depth of self preservation and muted the privity. It's certainly not for everyone, but the niche is quite clear and I think that if you're in the in this niche like this, called brutal, dark SMO's really films with which I am it's a sure if I are hit. Yeah, I also was very impressed with the killing of a sacred deer. Like Chris said, it's very much a landmoss film as no mistaking it. It's an extremely atmospheric film. There's are a whole lot of a lingering sense of dread in the air, especially because it's so and clear exactly what is going on. There's a great industrial like sound effects, lots of Anglo photography, some overhead shots looking, you know, straight down, as some of the characters faint without giving away too much of it. But yeah, the whole film just circles around this father who has to make a decision that no man should ever have to make. And there's a few house and wires. They go a little bit UN answered, but just the whole tense relationship between Colin Farrell and Verry Keygna as the teenage boy who he connects with, shall we say, is just had a really well, very dynamite performances and a film that lingered in my mind for several days after I watched it. I like that you make it sound like a great connection between a man and the teenage voice. That's fascinating when you see the film. Once again, going to be a distanting voice here, and sorry about that. It's the only daunting mustream I don't like and I think it's but I think the way he do acts his actors. It was very well in something that the lobster, but it doesn't work so well for me in this maybe because I don't see the comedy in it. I don't know. I don't know if it's supposed to be there, but I just I don't see it and I find that the monotoon way of jointing his actors is kind of hurts the inherent tragedy here. I think the only...

...of his actions who did those we do really with it here is Nicorn Kidman. I. Yeah, Bo key can. Everyone loved his performance. I don't really like. I guess I don't really get it and I don't love also, the way he kind of name drops the if Eginia myth, which is what this is kind of based on. It kind of feels like, Oh look at me, and retelling a Greek myth isn't kind of astive, as if it legitimizes the film. And maybe that's me just putting intense into menty Moses words, but or his him, but anyway, yeah, I didn't really respond to this. It's I like the first act, like the beginning of it. I actually like the way he says of the mood to a forboarding, but then the thing kind of went on and kind of lost me. I might just respond to the comedy in the killing of a psychodia. I don't want to get into too much spoilers territory, but there is definitely one part in there where I laughed out wild where I didn't think I should look at such a grims howl and I'm not going to reveal too much, but there's a part where, basically corror Colin Farrell is spinning around in his living room towards the end, and I'm not going to say why exactly, but just the whole white set up. It is a very comical but it's unusual sort of comedy and what to have in there because it is such grim tail. I'll probably agree that it's not very comedy based compared to the favorite or dog to with or the blobster. It's definitely a laugh out loud funny film and also, I feel, probably even a very groom film. But I do think some of thees see some comedy in the still the killing of a sacred hears a film I really liked as well. It's a very lengthy most films, as as you get said, which is a real tribute to his talent to have been able to create his own visual identity like like this a few in just a few films. It's a film that is extremely called, as was mentioned, in the visuals and also in the performances of the different characters. The music is extremely Yuri. I guess which makes the films even more dance and very strange and almost oppressive atmosphere. I would say. You know, the camera angles also that were shoes are quite unusual, I would say. I mean when I was when I was watching the film, I look, I've only see one film of it, but I was thinking of a Roy Anderson Songs from the second fold and in all of the films the camera where the static throughout the different shots. Here we have some stat it shots, but we also have travel cameras just foring the the actors around and usually when when the camera do it, it is at actor's height, let's say. And in the cases, well, sometimes the camera was putting the actors but also sometimes it was filming from from the floor or from down, which makes it even more strange in a way, I would say you, because it's quite unusual in in this type of film to jump from quite cross sometimes and yet managing to keep a distance from the character and the general extremely cold and dark atmosphere the film manages to create. If neverite this, see they really bringing up to the comedy is not as self evident as ln the most previous films. It is more strange, but you know this extreme awkwardness. The character still liver their lines and their lines themselves in the extreme banality, this hardness. It's it's darkly humorous, but it's more under the surface and it's equally airy at all times that they don't you mentioned the overpowering soundtrack either, filled with the classical music, music which maybe both strength and the weakness in some ways, but it's yeah, I was talking about how clinical it is. It's also about how the toached it is from all of from everything that's happening and shooting, you know, from the roof and seeing them little small on the floor, or just taking that degree of separation...

...from the emotions and not really humanizing them to the way that you another approach could have done. I think that works really well in making it, like I said, eerie and unnerving. It will certainly be had in a completely different way, with far more realism and emotion, and maybe also had a really strong impact on me. But I think that there's the way lundons did it in this like horrors, dark comedy style that really got under my skin network incredibly well for me, and with that all of our number five are out there. So let's continue to our four favorite films of two thousand and seventeen, starting once again with clam. Okay, so at number four I have French film lissions in each other, or ORSO none that it's English type title led the corpses ton. It's a film that was directed by Inn catty and the Bohio shows any well, since my number five film was about eyes that gone wrong, this time it's another rice to film, but this time the ice actually goes right. The film follows a gangsters who just stall from bank truck which are now hidding at a alcoholic writers place by the sea, in very role, let's say house, and later on in the film Arather quickly the film the police start investigating for something else, for the disappearance of two women and children. They eventually comes to the House and then most of the film will focusing on this kind of jewel that the police and the gangsters will be having. So I think the main strength for the films is, first, easy editing. The editing is quite fast paced in a lot of lot of cases that it really just keeps going on and on. That extremely fast, while there are some other parts that are a bit slower, but he usually doesn't really ask for too long. It also uses not exactly flashbacks, but it also comes back very often to a few minutes earlier in the day, let's say, because we have different characters that eventually split to hide in well, pretty much everywhere they can, and the film goes back in time for a few minutes very often to well showcase what the different characters are doing. So I thought that was that was quite quite interesting to see, because you know what you can, you know what happened, you can hear what happened, but you don't really know what really what we happened. We did it and by showing the different characters after one after one, it allows the story to just slowly unfold in front of us. Another extreme interesting thing is also the visual black in good time, while it's not a kneeon like in good time, but the esthetics is also quite reddish at a lot of points. These are a lot of shots of them smoking sarettes and up in their faces illuminated with red yellow and the sluff like that, which is quite nice to to look at. I think overall it takes a lot from exploitation western I was reminded a lot of I don't know just in these setting and the story and the way the film is made. It just reminded me of a something someone and exploitation film director could have could have made them. Yeah, I think overall it's different film, especially in this day in ages, that really should be seen by more people. Yeah, this is a film that's all about the location and the style. So the location, you mentioned it. It's a remote thing, but it's this ruin in Cossica and it's just you can see how Cattine, for the NY, found this place and I may feel with that the film is just then finding this place and figuring out a movie to shoot in it, because it's just so inherently cinematic and great location and almost all of the thing, isn't it? This kind of old ruin and the style. You mentioned the editing, and that's of course a huge part of it, but another part of it is can is how fetishistic it is. Right, it's old inserts and extreme close ups, kind of like se Julio style close up some faces, and also the sound design.

Right, there's the sound. The sound of leather on skin is basically a character in this film and I think all of those stylistic elements are very cool. I do it. It's another case of the film being just slightly too phonetic for me, but I definitely appreciate this kind of sales. Really only on stoids style. That definitely a unique film and and something that I did enjoy. Yeah, I thoroughly enjoyed the corps the Stern. I went to it as a fan of the directors previous films. I'm there and the strange color of your body's tears, and similar to those two, it's a very stylish film, but less horror based than those ones, where those ones have a real horror slamp or it, whereas this one, like Clem said, it's more of a western and with the whole idea of the stolen stash of gold. The film that I reminded me of the most was the good, the bad and the ugly. So if you wanted to see the good, the bad and the ugly, as directed by the directors of the strange color of your body's tears, this might be the perfect film for you. But yeah, and I absolutely loved it. It was so stylished, as the others have mentioned already, the rapid fire cuts, the alighting in there, the angular photography, it has a real surreal nightmare flavor to it and I think from memory there's I get bits of dreams and fantasies in there also, so it's not just all straightforward but yeah, very powerful. Some of the fetish stuff which Matthew mentioned is definitely in there. I had no idea before going into the film what exactly the poster for the film represents, but it does actually represent something which could be considered a sexual fetish. So it's quite interesting, but I'm not going to spot for people haven't seen the film yet to just judge to that's I did think of. That's when I said finishistic. But it's also maybe it's not the same English, but finishistic is also just kind of being obsessed with objects and there's definitely a sexual element as well. But yeah, I'm suthing the way the thing is is obsessed with with objects and a lot of insul trucks that that's where where it comes from, is that it used to be about the focus on objects and then the world kind of took on a slightly different meaning. It's definitely both meanings in this case to bear. Yeah. So, m dear, what's your four favorite film of two thousand and seventeen. Oh Yeah, my my number four. It's going to go very quick because we'll talk about it later. It's higher on someone else as lists, and that's the death of Stunin. Very good and Soldam. What's your four favorite? So the film I've selected for my fourth favor for this podcast is a thriller from Thailand. It's called bad genius. What's it about? It's about a lonely high school student and she is really good at school work. She does are very many friends. She feels sorry for one of her peers so she helps her peer to cheat and after she does that, she ends up becoming roped into a wide scale exam shating scheme. And the film for me worked on a whole lot different levels. So it was partially about how the lonely people can be easily manipulated. I thought the lad actress and the supporting act t were both great in it. I'm not going to say their names because I'd boocher them, but just relationship ship between them or really interesting. And you are sure if the one students are only interested in her friendship to help, but che it was. You definitely wants to be a friend or not. On the other hand, I thought the film was also about standardized testing. It because the whole thing is about mordiple choice out to test and the film sort of looks at the way that they find to cheat and sort of give out these abcd answers so that other students are able to do it, and then they find some really interesting sort of musical and tapping ways to communicate it. So for me it's about also about being against standardized testing, which, as a teacher I'm I object to. ORSO the whole moderate choice thing doesn't really test what you know and what you don't know. And I thought, and yet another level, the film was also about this teams themselves and their warped view in life that cheating is the way to succeed in education. So I thought they're a whole lot of different interesting things going on in there. But look, above all it just worked really well for me as a now biting thriller. Constantly we're in suspense about whether or not we're going to get caught. There's an amazing part where they end up going to another location. Don't want to say too much and they're trying to like hide the answers and communication tools. You don't know if they're going to be caught or not. And whole thing did remind me a bit of an Ocean and eleven film and I think it's being a...

...pears that has before. But yeah, just very informing film. It does get a bit weak towards the end. I don't really like the centlement a way that it turns, but generally also flowed throughout. Yeah, bad genius is one say. There's a really, really fun and Exciting Watch and I think, like so many other films and I guess a similar vein. I mean the excitement here it's just seeing how they do it and just watching how the film essentially use the suspense mechanism to show the workings of a brilliant mind and and building up this scheme and building up the excitement and anticipation of if it will work or if it won't. Yeah, I think it's not really just really died at deep int it. It's like the Queen scammit little bit which you know, population popularized ches and just short excitement of chests without really diving that deep, deep into it. You have these techniques just making sheeting that exciting and this the ways of doing that in this little these little ideas that she comes up with and ties everything together and it's it's really suspenseful, is really funny. It has lots of twists in there. It's it's jumping back and forth with in various different things. Everything is not exactly as will appear either. So and you have this large fum character gallery with a lot of different the motivations se yeah, it's a twisted, fast paced fum thriller that I Tain't to be far more popular. Really it's the kind of things that I can see work for essentially every single demographic. Yeah, definitely I agree with that class, but it's something that really is quite accessible, another thing that uses fast and it's to do a fairly good effect. Obviously agree with what you guys said. It's it's a fun it's a fun fellner. I wasn't need to let down by the ending, which tries to make it into molistic story and that doesn't do work. But that doesn't take away from the swadder aspects, which are well done and ingenious and often clear at one point boost the film. Sorry, Tom to checking that. SWALEO. How the set's work? And Yeah, it's it does you could cheat that way. That's could be a mannure or somewhere the watch out, I guess. And yes, I think what the pin point there of the ending is is my least favorite, part two and the thing that perhaps stopped it from being a g great film for me. With this is a really good film and it's it is lightly easy and accessible, but it works really well. It's exciting throughout. So yeah, definitely recommended. I'm really place to hear you guys like that genius because, yeah, it's a film that I am, like Chris said, I'm surprised that's not better known. I think it really would appeal to worldwide markets because it's like so well done as a thriller and likes to have an exciting one and making shooting so exciting. So, yeah, I hope it does get a bit more exposure sometime into the future, something which I will mention, though, as I haven't actually seen the queens GAM but the comparison has now piqued my interest. Yeah, let's see if all loves the Queens Gambit and that that note, they can go out to mind number four, which which is Western, which just hits you with the beer. Both minimalism of Velasque Greece about. And what is so striking here is the way she manages to shoot masculinity, in particular hyper masculinity, or even this downright toxic masculinity, in the way that captures incredible vulnerability. Everything here is infused with a sense of powerlessness and sadness. It's, frankly, darry. We have all seen films that, you know, either revel in this behavior and characteristics or the shoals is as dangerous, scarier and nerving. But but this is not quite that film. and to make it even stronger, it also dives into national shauvinism and communication, even as some German work good was essentially stranded in Bulgaria fort complicated relationships with the locals around them, and this is enhanced further by this, this powerful central performance and the attempts at communication, with communication without word, and it's relationships that are for it's, like I said, really beer bond. You get trapped in this very sensory experience, which is something I absolutely love. But this, this vulnerability,...

...this weakness, this softness at the fit in these characters, especially I will lead mine heart, which the rich the film eaginees find it. It's just absolutely spell binding for me. Oh dear. Okay, so it looks like I'm the only co host night. He was also seen Western and unfortunately I didn't like it anywhere near as much as Christed. I didn't hate the film, so I liked more than transit, which as another billion school film which didn't really do much to me, which we discussed in the two thousand and eighteen podcast. Western look at has got a really great performances by great performances, especially the lead act, my hard newman. I thought you had a really great quiet intensity with him. But the film for me didn't really do much. I constantly had this sense that there was a tension that was about to erupt. But then nothing significant ever seems really happen, except for something with the Horse, which is probably the best left unspoiled, but otherwise it's sort of liking it. It's this fight going to break out of the village, is going to turn against them? Is the person he tells off harrassing that will girl going to get into a fight with him? Is this going to happen? Is just going to happen and nothing actually really goes anywhere and I mean I'll probably the clinch of me is as a scene where they're sitting around a bonomfire and they start braiding each other's hair and I'm just like wow, these guys are just really bored and they've got nothing to do. I don't know, as Unn Watch the Christ's the one who is staying me from the film. So yeah, I don't know. I mean look, I like the title Western. It is kind of interesting how there are some parallels with there, because, you know, he likes the Horse, he rides into a new town, he sort of saves this girl friend being harass. Is being a little bit heroic, but, you know, for a film running for a whole feature length, yeah, I don't know. It's just I mean the characters are really bored and that sort of like the I guess the whole Raisin deptor of the film is depicting this board and but I didn't feel the direct to manage to make their boredom to exciting. Fair enough, I think that this tension is ducking above a bitch, builds up and up and up, with all of these different loose threads and again all this vulnerability tied in there as well. It is part of what makes it soul, spell binding and even exciting for me personally. But I can definitely see why it would not work for everyone. So that's none. Also see that. Let's just jump right to our third favorite films of two thousand and seventeen, starting once again with clam. Okay, so my personal number three is a French film called Janette Montan sousion doction. It's about join of arc to be more precise, childhood in for Shepherd Village in friends and the movies and that adaptation. Actually, you're a book by your French ordor called Charpiggie, who wrote it in what released it in one thousand nine hundred and ten, so more than the century ago. I think it's interesting to notice that the director uses the same, the exact same text that the book album. I say it's interesting because the film is made in a peculiar way. Let's say you know it. On the one end, its features text that is well quite were written, but at the same time it featured the music of the French artist you go on if you don't know, is an artist that has been and seeing for about fifteen years, I would say something like that time. That mixes a lot of different style of music, going from electronic to classical music to death the black metal type of music. Here it features is electronic, I would say, material, even though it does some blast beats here and there, and the contrast between the two is, injury, extremely interesting to see and very peculiar, very unique. It works extremely well, I think, and it gives a certain taste to the film that has probably never been done before, especially on Joan of arch who I mean we all we have, we all have seen her in other films, whether it is...

...the higher film or maybe the one that look be did or the one that we bet did, and it's never have this almost comic feel to it when you when you look at it, because there is this contrast ten well, the subject that is extremely classic in a way, let's say, and on the other end, the music that is completely all over the place, even though it's not his most weird material or it's still it still up there. And Yeah, I said, I found it fascinating to see two words collide, one very ancient, let's say, in the way to speak and the way they dress and the way they are, and this very modern type of music. I haven't seen the sequel yet too, I have to say, but I definitely have to get down to see it, because this first thing is definitely an experience that everyone should should see at least once. Yes, Jane, it is a very strange film. You mentioned o region of it, the piggy text, but it should also be mentioned that piggy was himself kind of referencing not something specific but medieval genre which is called the medieval mystery. And that's not like the name of the Horse. It's it means something with that kind of has magical realism in it, and so the sum duck story, God of is good for that. And Yeah, it's just a strange film. I mean the choices are a kind of insane and sometimes they dire great, I think, like when you have the nuns kind of headbanging. That's just a unique image or it's yeah, I mean that's what kind of what we go to the cinema for, what to see something we haven't seen before, and I definitely haven't seen that. I do think the dialog is very tough on especially the age old actresses, the children, because it's very is both really it's kind of a mix between really on eight and really naturalistic and yeah, that's just a very tough balance to strike for a chart actor and I don't think they managed that well. I think the film gets about better with the teenagers. I think the acting gets better and it works. Yeah, just works better and quite good. I'm quite curious to see the secret that you mentioned and that reason they also missed it. But it's a really unique film. I don't know that's entirely works, but it's to me it's well seeing just because it's so strange. Yeah, it's a bit like this. Then then that is an experience and it's a pretty daring film as well. I really respect a lot of the choices there. I think the nun dance in particular, it's a standout and the fact it, know, it merges in the wrap and the heavy metal and rock rock, etc. Into this very sparse and environment. And it's just the fact that it's so stripped down, like large portion of thing is just essentially shot in two, three four locations, most of it out in nature. Like you think. You get twenty, thirty, forty minute scenes like in warm area, with long drawn out the music choices, very little laborate setup. It's sparse minimalistic and they have this kind of extrem with the on the other side and some of the music is quite catchy. I didn't love it personally. I can see really, I can really see why some of the would, because there's so much uniqueness, there, so much scaringness. It's ristually interesting, it's creatively interesting. So while it's this jarring excercise but a little bit wrot for me, I think it's something most people should definitely see this discover the self if this is something they would love, because it's it is truly unique. Think of it that way. Do you want to see Jen back story told in the side of the Papagehoule with heavy metal? I mean, if yes, please do watch the Sham. Yeah, that's such a good description that you I think I should mention I am huge fun you go the guys who made it, the music. I knew is work before watching the film, which I guess really really help L so appreciate the film as a whole. I also agree with you create so style of the film is very minimalistic in its setting. You needs characters, because we don't. We can see that making characters throughout throughout the film, but I think it works. I think it work extremely, extremely well this case. So mightia. What's your third favorite film of there? So my number three is call me by your name. To get back to something much more conventional, fame that I think is defined by sensuality in the fullest sense of the word. Obviously this is...

...a love story and one that certainly doesn't shy away from the sexual attention and release that entails, but I mean sensuality also in the way that got anymo films. This Italian summer, you can almost feel the sum on your skin and the breeze going through the trees. That's a basic escape steppe to this film in the sense of being immersed in this very pleasant vacation. But of course we also get this great hole Romans with the slow buildup of tension as the character's secret each other, and one shots to truly the release of that tension and then the consequences, which culminates in a melancholy but hopeful ending as we watch Timota Shal I may process it all on that great final shots while the credits whore. It's a simple coming of age shell really, but it gets everything rights, especially in terms of the performances, with shallms vulnerability, you Hanna s Charisma and confidence, and Michael Stool bags compassion and understanding, as as the father. Add to that the Sophian Stevens score and the s pop soundtrack, which I both used they were and you've got a film that really captures a feeling of a youthful summer. There's something else that I specifically appreciate here, which is the multilingual aspect. But this is mostly in English, but we also get some Italian and French, and that's just something I personally always enjoy. When so many films eraise language differences as much as they can. This even use it purposefully in seemed between shy and a girl he's rejecting essentially by him choosing to use a language instead of another, and yet I just love that kind of thing. That's a more detail must be. This is just a bitch perfect coming of age horments funny, I think. What's the out a lot to me, I must do out a lot of people. It's also the way captures and shoots the EIES and how it capture and shoots the summer and creates this very visual and the central, like you said, experience of this. I think it's a great film. I think is filled with really strong performances and it's certainly one of the biggest hits of the air and for a good reason. And it's not all my very favorite films of the air, I do think that it's the it's sometimes the drives on a little bit. I'm not sure how I feel about the other very extended ending but it's definitely a great film. Yeah, calling by your name is probably a good film. I'm going to say probably because I saw under very high expectations when it came out of the like the very height of the Oscar ball season. It's definitely very well acted, there's no doubt about that. Timothy Shalam is excellent in the film and up until I saw good time, it was actually my favorite Mali performance of two thousand and seventeen. I was really invested in his character and I thought he just knocked out of the park. In terms of the rest of the film, yeah, a little bit disappointing. I guess what I found the mostestapointing about it is that, you know, Matthew described that it's obviously a love story, but I didn't really get that takeaway from it. Part of the issue might have been that I had only a few weeks beforehand seeing Carol, the Todd Haynes Film about a lesbian love affair, and with the Todd Haynes Film Me Get all these great subtle looks and stairs and reaction shots to convey this like intimacy between the pair before they even kiss, and I didn't get any of that. And call me by your name. Pretty much the Army Hammer, timothy charmie stuff is left to the final quarter of the film. If I remember correctly, it's definitely in the second half of the film. Most of the film was about Charlemaig were working out, you know, when he should go all the way with his girlfriend. So I guess I was going into it maybe expecting this amazing gay love story, which it really wasn't. To me it was an interesting character piece, I guess, for the Charlemagne character, but as a romance of any sort, I thought there was only sort of like dropped in at the end and I didn't think it was really built after enough to the fact that I really didn't really fills built up and after the point of me really seeing them as absolute lovers. And when I started off my review of the film a few years ago I wrote for the first sentence titled after the Most Ridiculous Line of Dialog in the movie, because I just think that whole like dialog exchange, call me by your names, the worst part of the film. Yeah, I agree. I'm sorry, I hate to break it to you, but I just thought that I thought the part was that ridiculous and not not very romantic at all. But look for Charlotte's performance and for the ways characters built. I think yes, it's definitely something worth looking at. There is an unforgettable scene involving a peach which I don't think anybody...

...who's seen the film is ever going to forget. But was it one of the item or twenty best films of two thousand and seventeen? I would say no on that account. Yes, that's interesting that you don't see them. I'm your hammer Vanderhman's between the two old as, attention between the two as being that present in the fit, because to me it's really right there to I kind of agree about the title. I guess it's realiculous in the way that's teenagers can be ridiculous, so I think it works within the fin that yeah, I guess it's in Madi quocks better in another on. So yeah, to just to be clear, I don't hate the film and I don't I don't think the film's over right or whatever because of the title. Not going to put too much emphasis on the title, but yeah, I mean Army Hammer says it, not Timothy Charlome. So it's not a teenager saying. In the first place, it was just a really weird, offbase, strange thing about a film that I wasn't quite enjoying as much as expecting in the first place. Then of that dropped into me, I was like, well, you know, people really think this is one of the timpest films of the year. I'm not so sure. Oh yeah, and just remember it's yea, the feeling. It's something about but the best parts of the QUICCT. So, Sol what's your dread favorite? So my third favorite film of two thousand and seventeen is one of actually only two films that I've seen three times from the year. So I saw this once in cinema and I've seen it twice by myself on DVD, and I wasn't quite sure if the impact would be the same on the small screen because seeing in the theater and considering that it was a comedy, I thought maybe that was a part of it, but no, it was equally hilarious for me the second third time round. So the film is the death of Starlin. It's a film from Amando in Youtube, probably pronouncing an incorrectly, the director of in the loop and recently did the David Copperfield Film. What the film is about? It's about the manness that ensues when start and dies unexpectedly without a clear successor so. It's based on actual historical events, but in you see takes a delightfully exaggerated view on it, emphasizing all the petty squabbling of Stars Leadership Team following his demise, as they all suck up to his daughter, they argue about where to stand during a funeral and generally just backstab each other in a way of trying to get themselves up to the top. So the film is done with a whole mix of accents and twenty one century dialog. So it doesn't really capture the fly of my fifties Russia, but it's just worked amazing thing still as a looker, the instability of power structures that are based on single individuals with our succession plan as just so crazy. It's so exact dry, it's so funny and even though the characters wouldn't talk anything like this in the s Russia, you just imagine some of the squab and that would have gone on. One of the fun one of the most favorite lines of dialog of the film is I've had not mares that make more sense than this, which sort of sums up the film really well for me. Yes, this is obviously also a thin my notes. It was my number for interesting. You mentioned the language. It's something that I'm usually really picky about a current language, and this film obviously just goes with it, and I think that works, in fact, because it's a comedy and that only highlights kind of the absurdity of many of these situations. And I think the choice to let everyone have their own accents is also a good one. Please don't do like comedy Russian accents. That's just betterfy everyone, and yeah, this is just a day. Use Fim and I think I generally tend to prefer films that approach history through the Lens of humor. I think often historical films can have the make the mistake of kind of arguandizing the movement in history they're talking about. In reality, I mean, life is often simplesant hats. I think this is just a great approach and up the death of studing is just right for absurdist comedy and Yannucci really really goes into it with a lot of enthusiasm and it walked light. When I think see Bushemi as could chef is amazing. I mean she buschen is one of my favorite actors and exception here. Also Simon Hustle Beale as the yeah, they're basically to the true adversaries. He's great and Jason Heysac side of he has just a small hole as a as Juka from military man. And Yeah, just he walks into the film and owns it for five minutes. Yeah, it's just a great comedy that actually even do. It plays fast and loose with history and with actual facts here. I think it describes kind of the the absoluty of Tortary Tianism. Quite when. Did any of you mention that it's actually based on a comic books graphic novel as well, because I think that it does show a little bit, like you have yea lute and the comic book. Sensibilities just merge together into this mad mental image and it's a very visual film as well. The...

...way they introduce the characters, in the way they play around with history in this very sarcastic way. It's it's always visually striking and the comedy elements there are really great. It's it really trucks in the energy style as well. There all of this you know, wobbulling and bickering and pettiness, but also this higher the level intrigue. I think, like you said, all of the actors, shine Bridgemmi is particularly extraordinary in this, and it's just everything comes together. It's Hilarious, it's petty, it's it's bizarre, it's it's a bit too silly sometimes maybe, but it's over the top of this off it all. It works really well and it's does that really great film. No questions really. You know, I agree thoroughly about the character introductions. They work really well. They seem a bit, you know, often at first, but they actually get really funny. Like there's a part where a couple of silent staff members come in after collapse in the ground and they're like ohly light and the whole things like sort of slow down as they come in and they titles pop. I've been introduced the characters. So yeah, and I thought it was very well done. I'm not sure about having the titles at the end which sort of explain what happened to all the characters afterwards, because I guess this is the exaggerated one. But, like I'm Matthew said, it works good because it's a comedy. I generally don't like historical dramas. I find them quite boring and stuffy. If you put a comedy slap on especially absurd as Slat, whether it being in a film like the death of Stalin or the favorite, it really makes me perk up and it makes me a bit more interested to learn about the history rather than having a boring costume melodrama. Yeah, I think Goustromo dramas can have that place, but yeah, it's that's so many of them for starters that is harder for them to distinguish themselves. And Yeah, I think history and community should mix more often. I mean my Kleinsman is another example. I mean it's not exactly the same kind of history, but that that's also another thing we both loved and that's can has this lighter approach to it. They say your subjects. Yes, I think you're absolutely right. Comedy in history should probably mix more more often for these kinds of experiences. And moving home to my number three, which I guess you there are some darkly communic elements in there. But if it's not, what most people would think about is happy end by Michael Hanique, which, you know, it's often called a lesser harnique and given the power of his best work, it may very well be that's that. That's the case, but it's still an incredible, unnerving experience and, frankly, equally as in yielding and bleak as killing of a sacred there and just before I continue, don't worry, but my next two choices won't actually be aspect soul crushing as these two. But what strikes me as the most wisterally riveting here is just how it makes the tached footage stand of than even more powerful. It's films on smartphone screens like literally everything else is black. We just see the smartphone. They shoot the computer screens and just that alone. We have security camera footage, TV footage, and it all ties into this tense of absolute detachment and alienation from what we're actually watching. And even in this more so, it shalls in natural stages. They can bur Mari and its angles are often entirely static and purposefully obscured, leaving just so much hidden from the frame. We obviously many films are dissected the the upper classes and power relations, and I don't think this is necessarily even the most striking part of what Honeke does here. Even as you showcase, it's noticed largely damage family in all their splendor, including their lived in servants, which, you know, the Grandsun essentially at one point describes as slaves. And it's just startling from beginning to end in its simple mendanity, not not to mention that the tie ins with the refugee crisis. I really think that the existentialism and relative in humanity is even more striking completely this look at modern society. and not to mention this the powerful chem industry, with between the old Louis thinking...

...now and his granddaughter in the The dactor destruction of the grandson, played by the wonderful France Rogolski, who is in several Berlin School of Films From and just the ending itself and it's just so many great performances there. Upper is excellent as always, and the film that fills so multilied with so many damaged and discomforting human beings and experiencing at the center and the soul crushing area underbelly of the existential doom and despair ever present throughout. Yes, I agree with you, Chris, IP ended multilayer film. We have all these characters interacting with one another, whether it is as grandfather or is a daughter and son. It's really hard to really know what everyone is thinking. In this film, as I said, we have all these characters who have their own issues, sometimes very serious one, including people being in Chroma or a work accident that took place at is a value pere construction site. You you can you can tell that they try to, you know, Co communicate with each other, sometimes communicating by computer and text, text chat, rather than talking directly to one another. Yeah, it's quite sad in a way. The film is probably not, I thinker's best movie. I would I would say I'm huge fan of most of his films, but yeah, I would reis this coin is a lesser I maker, because I feel like he's trying to tackle on the subjects that you already talked about in in previous films, and I feel like this is a mix of well, seems he had wrote his old filmography, but it gives the sense that nothing is really developed enough. Let's say it was done already in other films, but it looks like a patchwork of seems he likes to film about. But yeah, I think it like sometimes details and maybe maybe I would have appreciated if the film went a bit more into some some of the subjects that are talked about in the film. So yeah, both claiming. Chris talked about the description of happy and as I Lesser Manica film, and I would agree with that description, although I know I Chris doesn't support that outside that's fighting our curate description of the film. I thought there was a lot of interest going on, especially, like Chris said, they are opening of it which is on a smartphone screen where always see it's text messages, and then, like Clem said later on, you've got some characters who would prefer to talk via computer to each other rather than speak directly to each other, which is really interesting and I thought, okay, so Hannaka is going to try and explore maybe some social media and the way that communications are changed a bit over time. But these parts are any really as a very small part of the overall narrative and it really POPs up on occasion. It's not like an unfriended thing where everything's all I'm just on one screen and the other thing is that and it might just be the print of the film that I watched. But the subtitles for the smartphone only came on the smartphones or rather than at the bottom of the whole wide screen frame, it would just be like narrowly on the smartphone. So I was having a lot of trouble actually reading the translations of the French. I mean some of it I can guess because I've done bit of French and high school, but I found that a little bit distracting. So I mean, if you compare to something like the unfriended films or other films that have been on a computer screen, they've taught of tender zoom in on parts of it, on bits and pieces, so it's not just all like long shot and I guess the way that Hannak has done it because sort of get that long shot of the phone. We've got that long shot of the computer screen, so sort of squinning to see what they're writing, which I guess I found a little bit more intimate thats or a little bit less intimate. The probably be more into and more involving for me if I could clearly see what they're typing, because that's just a really interesting process. But look beyond that. The only part of the film that really struck a quarters with me was the whole grand daughter grandfather relationship. I thought there was really well handed. I thought both actors were amazing and the roles they're especially the young girl, whose name I could try and say I'll be end up porchering it fantine hard doing anyway,...

...she's she's excellent in it, as well as trigging a dub't but it's probably pronounced NAM also incorrectly. But the chemistry between them, the way they eventually bond realized they've got more in common than they thought because they both have a bit of a sadistic street to them, without spoiling too much, was excellent. The rest of the film and all the dramas about the workplace incident, yeah, just did nothing for me. I think if the film was really about just a grand or on the grandfather. Had A bit more social media in there, I think I would have loved it. At the moment it's more of a like for me. So not a bad film, I'd say it's a good film, but yes, a less a Hunnoka for me. definally, a great film for the French promocisition, but he's this one. This is not the kind of fam I love in general and its just perhaps way I haven't seen much Hanneker. There's something that fuse a little smoke to me. They can look at these puppets how we did us they are and they never feel to me like we are characters. Definite truth in the satire that Hanaken Wings, but I think I just don't really believe in these characters for the most parts. But again, I haven't seen much. Yeah, it's a thing that I, you know, I appreciate on just a technical level. I think the way he uses screens, as you guys mentioned, is, you know, quite efficient and I like the end of its actually the final shots with the watch is involved, let's say. But yeah, it's just not the kind of thing that I love in general. I just have a little trouble with it. I do agree that the performance is also quite good. I mean you get see any better joid Conte, know that just always going to be very good. And Yeah, the chat performance by frontenaw giy is also also quite quite good, very good. And with that to actually covered our our number tens and number three of two thousand and seventeen. And looking at the clock here, we're already well passed the ninety minute market. It's probably going to look a bit shorter when it's all edited down, but this might be a very good and natural place to just pause the discussion. Let this be part one of what looks to be a really excellent to partner here. So thank you so much for listening, everyone, and join us again next time when we continue the countdown revealing our number two and then finally, our number one, favorite field of two thousand and seventeen. You have been listening to talking images, the official PODCAST OF ICM FORUMSCOM.

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