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Episode 48 · 6 months ago

Best Films of 2017 - Part 2 (Our Top 2 Choices)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Join in as Clem, Matthieu, Sol and Chris reveal their second and number one favourite films of 2017.

You are listening to talking images, the official podcast of ICM Forumcom. Welcome back to part two of our countdown, or shall I say count up, of our favorite films of two thousand and seventeen. In part one, we discussed each of our individual fifth, four and third favorite films of two thousand and seventeen in detail and even included five runner ups. Now it is time to jump into the top of the crop, revealing our second favorite films of two thousand and seventeen, before we move on to the crown duels of them all, ending this two partner on the bang. Don't mind you with quite a few disagreements along the way because, as you mentioned in part one, there are very few overlaps between our lists and our tastes do very so without any more I do. Let's just get right into it, and, just as we didn't part one, we can start with it. You met you. So what is your second favorite film of two thousand and Seventeen? All Right, so my pitch for number two best film of two thousand and seventeen is a film by Davy Glory, which is a ghost stories. The film is about a woman WHO's trying to cope with the sudden death of her husband, who seems to have become a ghost. I remember I saw the film in theater when it was released and there is a scene toward the beginning of the film where, you know, we end control the ghost for the first time, I who's just man, you know, under a bed sheet, like on the the post of the movie. I remember that quite a few people were laughing when the let seem even though per personally, I didn't really find it funny, but I guess it was unexpected and that's why I also believe a lot of people worked out in and after a while, because I believe they were expecting kind of horror film and they were disappointed to see that it was not not the case at all. But it was a very slow film instead. On the film is extremely poetic, I would say, Lake of a better word, it's I think it's a beautiful description of having just something, let's say, sticking with with you that is always, always present, no matter where you are and what you're what you're doing. It's always there, but at the same time it's slowly, I would say, fading away, and I think the film shows that extremely well by well this disciplaying this ghostly figure that it's a very famous image of a ghost usually looks like. You know, that's what everyone, everyone does, you know, as a kid you just hide on't theer a bit sheet and good your ghost, and I thought it was very clever to help this very child like image of ghost mixed with this very well dark subject, to know, a studdent death of young husband. So I think overall the film is, as I said, a bit slow. So some people describe it as extremely slow. I don't the case at all. I think it's a bit slow, but honestly they are way slow film than then this song. It's once again a film that is extremely poetic and quite unusual it in its way. It's been seen by your quite a few people, but maybe not appreciated enough, I think, for what it is. So hopefully it's a film that will be rediscovered a bit and talked a bit more in a future, future years. We knows. Yes, the story is also my number two and yeah, I also remember seeing people walk out of its in the theaters. Now that you mention it, it's a hard film for me to talk about. It comes down to, I think, what differentiates films I like from films I love is often a sense of transcendence, of a film reaching something I couldn't quite express in any way, which is exactly why the medium of film is survivable. It can explore things that language or all the forms of expression sometimes fade too. And Yeah, this film, they openly goes for that and for...

...me it clearly succeeds. Anything I could say about this film in terms of theme would feel kind of trivial or pretentious, but in the film's only slight misstep is when it tries to put those ideas into actual words as a Monologu at one point. I think it's much better when it's just content in making us like, look at Rooney Mara eating pie for an eternity. So yeah, it's a fambout time that grief but love and about death and you know nothing less than the meaning of existence. And Its main character is Casey Affleck, playing a ghost in a little sheets, which all sounds like a recipe for disaster, but low is somehow makes it worse, and as much as I wish I would know what that somehow entails, I just don't visit the aspect rashow is it's the mournful and affecting score? Or is it the precise way in which loy and his cinematographer and Will Palermo, organize each shot? Or is it the promances of when you mail and gas Acacia flick, who brode this emotional grounding, that all the themes too kind of Wax Lim call and metaphysical about the passenger of time? I don't know, but for me it's a it's a really profound experience and when I'd recommend to two. So, in talking about a ghost story, I would like to say that these people who walked out of the cinema. But but I'm not. I didn't actually see it until I came out on DVD and I didn't walk out of it. But I did find the first half of the film to be a bit of a sure ideas. Definitely very slow paced for a reason, but I guess I felt that it was lingering a lot on shots where nothing much was happening. I did really like the second half of the film, though, where it comes a bit of a mischievous polder geistand listens to conversations about memory and wonders. Two streets at night illuminated by bright signs and lights I thought, you know, those parts in the second half a really good but the first half of the film really frustrated me. So I liked it overall with reservations, but it's definitely a film that in the months since seeing it, has kept playing the back of my mind and it kept going. Or maybe I did under the value it. It has, like Matthew said, got a really great Moody Music Score, and I mean the second half of the film works so well for me, but I'LL SOO put off by the first half. But that I can definitely understand why people might have walked out of the cinema. If I pay money to see it. Well, I love I go stories. It was on my top ten, obviously, and I think it's just so full strong a year two thousand and seventeen was that are so many great films I couldn't include in my top five. I think what works so well in the ghost story and what makes it in some ways one of the most thriving films ever made, is just the brutality of the sheet. When you have goal stories, you usually have the real person. Maybe you make them transparent, maybe you make them looks like you did, maybe look exactly as they did maybe play around with the the visuals a little bit here. It's just a sheet. They put a sheet over his head and that like over its entire body and that's it. Just it's so brutal, it's so minimalistic as well. It's so jarring. It it's it's horrifying in a way. It is just so simple and playing and and extreme and it's just it a stare at him and it's like looking into nothing as especially when it starts playing with time and it really dives into this existentialism in this this dread and this sadness and just how much emotion this sheet, is little sheet, can actually invoke in you. I think it's an absolutely incredible accomplishment by lobby and I think it's yeah, it's beautiful, it's stunning, it's effective, it's a little bit surreally and I really agree that. You know, the narration probably took me to a little bit out of it. I don't, I think the visual aspect of it and just again that sheet, it's what really makes it stand out, makes it incredible, makes it so brutal and ensures it is the film out never ever forget. Yeah, I think if I had no new Chris. When I saw a ghost to week, I would have definitely thought, oh, yeah, he's going to know this, because the ism of the sheets is like gunnip to you. It doesn't make sense. So that's actually both Clem and mature in one go. So, Sol what's your second favorite film out of two thousand and seventeen? So my second favorite of two thousand and seventeen is a film that blew me away when I saaw it in cinemas and I recially. We re watched it...

...on DVD, which was interesting to sort of light process it, knowing where was going to go, because the first time I saw I was just so amazingly unpredictable. The film is three billboards outside a being Missouri, filmed by Martin McDonough, who did in in Bruche, and what the film is about most people know about. It's about a mother of murder teen who rent three billboards to renew public interest in a case and sort of get some messages on their calling out the our town sheriff and it's a semispontaneous decision, almost spur of the moment, but it has a lasting impacts on everyone around. The film's a blend of comedy and drama and when I viewed it for the second time, some of the mountain coincidences I found a bit hard to swallow. But then again, the film is about fate and chance and, as I said, befom the two thousand and eighteen podcast and really into Cohen Brothers style films, and this one does play around with faint and chance like a Cohen Brothers movie. It's also got a grand card of birlll Carter birl will score and a stellar performance from Francis mcdormand. So it films. It feels like a kin brothers film. But besides for that, either way, it just works really well because we see the ramifications of her decision are everyone around it from order, from perspective. So it's not just her, it's also the sheriff who's got his own issues because he's got a terminal illness. It's about his deputies and how it affects them, and everybody in the film actually comes up as sympathetic and relatable by the end of the movie, which you don't really get a lot of films. There's no clear cut good guys are, bad guys are or just relatable human beings and it ends in a way that's slightly uncomfortable, but it's intentionally so, because there's all this on so and he hanging in the air and it's what that whether the characters will realize that anger just be gets greater anger to great quote from the film, and whether they'll learn from their experiences, whether the situations during the spore even further and further out of control. So in not really sums up the film for me. It's a semis so it's a semi spontaneous decision which has is great ramification and then are the end of it. It just not sure there's going to be more ramifications, whether the characters will finally learn to control all their anger. Yeah, I think that's a really good summary of the film. Soul. I absolutely glee it has coen brother arrives through the roof friends. Mcdormant is incredible in it, as this Sam Rockwell and wood, the Harelson and I think what the bring out there with the fact that everyone's so relatable, especially by the end, that you have so much empathy and sympathy for each characters in this tales just so much hatred and anger as well. I think it's incredible achievement and you also have this black comedic elements that just works so well throughout. It's definitely very strong film, though, like you mentioned, the coincidences, some of the other elements in the field to make it little bit lighter. For me, it's not one of my very favorite films of the year, but it's definitely one now'll I'm happy to recommend filling boxes within. I like ant and I think one essential thing about it is that it's essentially a film about redemption and it comes from an Irish filmmaker, which means that he's someone I don't know if he's Catholic, Martin mcdonna, but he definitely grew up in a society that where Catholicism is quite central, and I think you really see that in his film, at least I do, having got up Catholic myself, and this idea of redemption, which is sound central in Catholicism, that's no matter what you've done, redemptional grace should be given to you. I think that's what the film really is all about and you mentioned that's kind of uncomfortable ending sword and yeah, I think the ending is great for that reason. is we are not comfortable with the fact that some of these characters may or may not be granted redemption and essentially that the whole film is just leading up to that. Is is kind of questioning that notion in a way that is humanistic and also entertaining along the way. Yeah, I think I think it's a it's a great one. It's really great to hear these positive takes on the film from both of you, because I know when the film came out it got while a bit aback lash for some of its portrayal of domestic violence and for apparently promoting vigilanteism. But rewatching the film, I looked at it and the domestic arlen seeing question whilst less than two...

...minutes and the film isn't really pro vigiliante unless you actually missed the whole message of the entire film. So I was just really interesting. We watch the film sort of confound in my mind that now those people were ridiculous and it shouldn't have really got the height that it received or the backplush it received after the end up winning the Goden wit best picture. Well, I wouldn't go so far. I get why people reacted so fully to the swim in way it was to controversial and because I think you can see the fame having being a bit soft towards this characters. I don't personally see that way, but I can definitely see how you can think that some awkwards character in particular. He's kind of being excused basic thing. I think. Again, that's too to me. That's what the thing is about. But I think I understand why people had this very negative reaction. And when it comes to a world season, those kind of things are always blown up a thousand times might so the discourse gets even worse. Yeah, it's probably a good point on Matthew. If the film was one of these big ones in award seasons or probably something or just like shot over and forgotten, but since everybody kept holding it as one of the best films of the year, I think that kind of a grade. Some of the people who, yeah, I mean I can see why they'll get annoyed about that. Two minutes saying of domestic violence, I can understand, while I getting way with the way they sound. Were Rock well, character arc has handle and understand that. But yeah, I think I gracist been blown out before and unfortunately, sorry by look the film still quite hotly eclined. It's still be a sting IB IMDB top to fifty. It didn't need to win the best picture of square then need to get the best root to Oscar nomination to still be remembered as one of the years most powerful films. So so my ruther up for favorite film of two thousand and seventeen would probably be in my favorite film from most years this past decade. And it's faces places by Agns Vadada and, for the first time, with a CO director, the younger artist Jr. And what I really love here, and what comes out even more on the rewards, this is how all encompassing and multilayered this film miss I mean the easiest summary is a simply Vanada, and they are and easy pair with not a fifty year gap between them. She's eighty eight and he's in this early S, just hitting the road on the mission to capture faces and places across France, just finding people, taking their picture, blowing them up and putting them on Rolls, Barn trains, you name it. And just this aspect of it alone is beautiful, especially in how they do it, because they visit these martialized communities such as a disappearing mining town, striking doc workers, they meet hard working farrs and there so many everyday people which they then bring to life on the camera. But in traditional Vada fashion, it's also the story of the creation of this project, the act of creating images, of discussing the project, of discussing of the people they meet and simply the act of filming and taking pictures of the event itself. I mean, it all becomes the film, it all becomes sent becomes a central narrative which you know at any point over the last decade would be great and you know is in and of itself. But then you also have this sense of Agnes's VI, the aging, being more frail, losing her sight. Know, perhaps it wouldn't be if she made one more film, but perhaps being her last and final project, and this sense of perspective and intimacy really elevates the film. And what then? So many ways, it's not only the filmmaker but a large part of the emotional core. I mean it is essentially a story of vitality and never ending creativity of this at this point, the eight year old woman with blurry vision and I came the still striving to do more, to create more, and then you have this almost invisible narrative which slowly sneaks up on you with the very strong and powerful emotional climax. It's warm, playful, creative and this really illuminess, the joy and necessity and this of creation, just people living in breathing creation, and it's just the such a wonderful and fantastic near masterpiece. To me, while I wouldn't go that far, I did quite like desert dage or faces places, if the plagued on yes or the beach is a...

...acness, was her autobiography. In some sense. The feel felt to me like her testament. I guess haven't seen that about yes, the last film she actually managed to get out before recently dying, but yet it did. This felt like a very fitting finding thing, if it had to be. It's just it has a lot of her joyous personality and yeah, I think she bounces very well out of Gr and also creativity, endless creativity. She started as a photographer and so this kind of project makes a lot of sense. And Yeah, I'm not as in amate with it. I think just Germany, the push two thousands and yes, other documentaries are own, like I don't necessarily love any of them, but their own very, very enduring impact, because lad herself is just this, this very unique and and great personality, and that that that really comes to in these films. Yeah, I like this one, not as much as you, but it's definitely and seating end, almost end to her career. It's interesting to hear Matthew describe faces places as being a fitting into VATER's career, because I'm not really able to look at it through that Lens. It's faces places is actually the only documentary that I've seen by Vada, unless you include lions love, which is sort of part documentary. Vata plays a bit of a role in there, but yeah, it's only straight forward, definite documentary that I've seen. The others, for whatever reason I have not, never really been in my radar. So, going into the film, I really like the concept of it. I like Jr's art and blowing up individuals and putting their photos on different walls. I thought that was extremely interesting and what I found just the pointing is that the film wasn't really about that. There was like even more of a subplot because a lot of it, I think, like Chris said, is about them going around and interacting with the people, this being part of the documentary. So you get this documentary which is, you know, many be about this artwork and staid to get all these deflections to goat milking and other activities, and I'm sort of watching it going. You know, I'd like you to actually get back to the artwork. I guess a couple other things which vexed me slightly about it is there's a bit of a sense of artifice to it. That's as part where they try and recreate the Louver run from band of outsiders but running through the art gallery. But the way that it shot together and the shots are cut together, it's clearly been artificial and shot three or four different times from different angles and put together. So I sort of like was a made a bit too maybe aware of the artificither didn't really feel spontaneous for me. And then the film sort of goes off towards the end and sort of the flex to being about Jean Luc Godard, which I think was meant to being in organic reflection, but I guess the way that it was built around that's of the Goddard stuff that gets dropped in at the beginning of the film, it just felt for me like maybe better than artificial plot turn and I didn't really like the fact that I kept going on a dark but dad and he was an interviewed, apparently because he didn't want to be, but it wasn't interviewed to don't really get him to do his side of the picture. So that was just really strange to me. But whenever the film was focusing on the photographs, flying them up, putting up but places, the way they look with all these people up there, this it's magnificent one, with the shipping containers and these women sort of coloring out of themselves and the shipping containers. You know, that was amazing and I just wish there was more of that and less of the goat milk king and this pretend justus was tainly recreate stuff from band of outsiders. Yeah, I guess I quite enjoy the digressive nature the tinging shown right, how we we we keep moving on to the stuff and it didn't feel a sufficient to meet friendline, just like just like how vaut that works in general. I think maybe maybe having seen more documentaries helptually, that just having more a sense of funding the Avigy with her a sup Oh yeah, I agree with that and I think it's also what what you expect, what to think the film will be, because it's why that's never that simple, even in something like the cleaners. Now you know it takes a it really plays to get anything you think about cleaners strikes into larger social context and then also makes about by that how she might clean. So it's you always works yourself into her documentaries and it's especially here, I think, since it's about creation. To me, the fact that they are creating these scenes and recreating these scenes and there's no artificiality about it, because that is just the act of creation, that that's works. This part part of the core. But it's, like Sol said, it's about what you want from the film and what you what you're going...

...in there for. If you're going in there specifically for, you know, these face, these faces in these places and this specific art, and I can definitely see why you would be disappointed. But if you are more inclined to the diversion of either which you know are always there, and and just the acts of creation and this type of metal that attempts, then it is then it will definitely be for you and as a mat your joke that any recordings. It is kind of like a truly not quite but like. It has these elements, it has twist, it has turned, it takes you for a for a ride. It's it's such a strong narrative as well. So it's it is so many things to appreciate low about this film, but it does so much that if you're only interested in some of the things it does, it may not work. Okay, what well, I deeply regret now not saying more that a documentaries before setting down to watch places places, because, like what you've described, I think I've had more of a background and you more of what shows going for, I think I would have possibly been able to appreciate it a bit more. Oh, I definitely recommended especially the beaches of Agness, which is in a very similar vein but also even more personal. But on that note, I think we're actually all the way up to our favorite films. Finally were here and once again, Clem, take it away. What is your favorite film of two thousand and Seventeen? Okay, so number one for me of two thousand and seventeen is, and it's going in film by Ryano sound it and the movie is called November. The film is about a love story, I would say, that is set in a small Estonian village in during the winter. It's a place where peculiar things happen, let's say, filmed with is, well, magic, it's let's good it. This way you can make a deal with the devil to get animated objects that can work for you, that you can built out of things that you find around your house. They're also the dead that comes to reach you sometimes and you have to give them food and prepare SONA for them. And, as I said, the film is centered around, well, this love story. It's very simple love story. There is this girl, Lena, who loves aunts that as doesn't lover. He loves a German baronness actually. So it's a story that has been, you know, told a million times before in all shape on performs. But this film has something special and well. Firstly, it has absolutely breathtaking black and white cinematography. It's absolutely gorgeous to look at. I was just drewed to the screen entire two hours just looking at out how incredibly beautiful the film looked. Whether it's shot during daytime with this snow all over the rover, the place, images filled with light or, if it's short, during night time, with the moonlight or fire and torches and everything just gives it an incredible, incredible look. I think, once again, it's a story that has been told a few times, but this film manages to mix those fantasy elements I mentioned then some others I want I want to talk about, not to spoil it, this elements manages to keep the film extremely original, extremely surprising. As I as I say, I couldn't just I couldn't take my eyes away from it. And Yeah, it's just it's just a film that is incredibly beautiful to look at. There is this feeling of just almost like it will, it's happening in another world, because they're just so hut from from everything. Is just something that is happening in their own small world, in its in its own and yeah, I just think it's folk fantasy film, I would say, that features a lot of stories that just kept me just hooked from beginning to end. And Yeah, I recently re watched it for this cast a few days ago, but I just can't wait to to rewatch it again because I think it's definitely one of the highlight of the absolute decade for me. So this film I worked for this podcast and I went into it with a bit...

...of trepidation because it's an Estonian black and white film. I presumed it would be about world war two in some way and I expected something a bit dour, and he had. The first scene is this scene of the kind of demon made of agricultural objects that kind of kidnaps account and so yeah, that was right. Awia was kind of into the film and this disconcept of the cut, I think they call it, that, those kind of demons made by packed with the devil, with the with the human, with the peasants trying to cheat the level. That's a concepted quote that is quite central to the film actually, and that first quite well and the film has a bit of a sense of humor about it, which I think is greatly welcome. Claim mentioned the amazing cinematography. That's obviously the biggest setting point for this film. It's it's gorgeous. There's the whole the way to say it. I think it works narratively. Mostly the center of the story is the this love triangle and I think that was quite well as kind of the tragic romantic love story and I like what the the letter box summary says this. This takes place in the nineteen century and so it feels very much like a story from the nineteen century. That kind of reclaiming those old folk legends, kind of in in a spirit of nationalism. And Yeah, we claiming that folk history and reinterpreting it and it has that romantic energy again, with that, with that love try and go at the center. So yeah, I think it works quite well. Okay, it's mostly a visual delighted penalogie is a bit jumbled at time. They are, I think, the same maybe attempts a little too much. natively. They are a lot of different strange in they're not all follows through as much as one would like them to. But for me it mostly worse and the mood of it is just when I appreciate it or not. Yeah, agree on one thing, which is that this is just the visual feast. It's beautiful, the black and white in thematography. It is almost expressionistic. It's incredible to look at it and spell binding and and the only reason why I cannot be as positive as you are is that there's just this extremely awkward disconnect with how it was shot and what they was presenting any general tone, because you do have this this beauty deep and then you have this ridiculous silliness almost, and it doesn't really play as a comedy. If a plates are comedy, I would have probably liked it better. But, like you mentioned, this like Mechanical Assembly picking up a cow. It looks so ludicrous it's right for laugh but then it's really isn't a comedy. It has this kind of childlike over sorry yokes throughout and it don't really hit home for me. It looks so ludicrous and silly that in contrast with the with the ritual beauty, that it doesn't work. There's a complete and after disconnect on me that that just made the film fall apart a little bit. I still liked it. I think it's strong enough wish really to like be good almost a matter of what they did. But that's just I cannot say it's the all really good film and certainly far far from being on my list of the best films off there. So sorry about that. Like Matthew, I watched November specifically for the podcast and like Chris, I did find the tone wavering a little bit and everybody's been talking about it so far, so I'm going to say it. Also just that initial scene with the creature cord, I crat, I believe, the crap, lifting up the cow and kidnapping it sort of and dropping it down. I thought that was amazing. Off being even win I was like, well, this is going to be such a cool film. I almost pause the movie and jumped on the discords message Clem and say, well, this is such a crazy, you know, WTF film. But I ended up being more of a film purest and just stuck with and watch them entire thing. And what was sad for me is that after that great beginning, nothing else to come as ever quiet, as quirky or as Cooky as that. Like Matthew said, there's quite a strong love triangle which takes up most of the plot there, but that never really interested me. I didn't find the characters, or you know they're pining for each are they interesting at all. I did find the cheating of the black death to be quite intriguing, especially with some of the ways they did it. I mean there's a part where they dressed up with like cloaks on and they're exposing their naked arrends to try and trick the death. That was kind of interesting, but there wasn't a lot of work in this like it for the most part. Yeah, I just thought was mainly about the unrequited love and the underharded trading and the merchant in spirls. I don't know, none of it was. Ever, is interesting for me as the crat,...

...and we do see the Krait later on moving about a little, and I would have absolutely love to see a film totally about the crat because, as Chris says, its amazing ridiculous type of thing and I just would have loved that. And I suppose out that introduction and with the rest of it being a little bit more serious, as suppose, the film was just a mild disappointment for me. Okay, yeah, I did this day, definitely in this time which you guys, which we gays men, and the absolute is intro introduction scene is very original to see the least. I understand what you meancrease when you say that maybe there's a comedy elements. Maybe took you off a bit from the from the film and made a contrast with was what you were looking at, because I are you exactly the same about when there is, like you this. So what contrast between a beautiful images and comic elements? That tree don't really been on here into in the case of the film, though, I didn't really spotted any comic elements. Maybe I don't know, because it's because I don't have a sense of Hubert, I don't but there is only one picked up that made me laugh, a dialog between the main character, Lena, and a man who she's supposed to marry because our father, we are, promised it to him when he was, when you will, when he was drunk. Apart from that, there are a few elements that I could see your chat as a comedy, but once again, I don't think this elements were funny enough to to distract me from the rest of the film. And Yeah, Sol yeah, film dedicated to the cut. I guess that's the other's how they called them. Would indeed be really, really good too to see the yeah, I would. I would definitely love to see like a side side film featuring those animated creature. That would something to I would enjoy seeing. I do think the thing wants to be commediate at times. I definitely do feel that way. And while I don't think that disconnect is as strong as as Quez felt, it definitely kind of jumps back and forth between between the two. I do think you guys are understanding how much the cuts are in the movie, though, because there's not only the the one that connects the cow, which we see a few more times, there's also the one that s snowman and who turns into like some kind of Luciano figure helping out the guys, to use the beness. I don't know, I thought the film's kind of them already kind of explode that concept a bit. Yeah, I know there were other crabs and there. I mean I agree with that. I just wish the crap was the making character, and I'm going to butcher the name, but if we wanted more recommendations for film, the creatures like a stop motion anime in the cyr films of Yan's Funk measure. Who did? I'm Alice, and could conspirators of pleasure and Luna say, and some other films like that, as well as a whole town of shorter stop animated films. Yeah, I definitely love I don't know, I don't know he's around pronounced, but yeah, I haven't seen much of his feature films, but I definitely love it short films and I definitely see someone enjoying his short film. I could definitely m enjoying November as well. So, my dear, what your favorite film of two and seventeen? Well, my favorites is a sequel to SCI FI classic I don't actually like all that much, and that's blade runner two thousand and forty nine. And he never retained the design and the esthetic of the original, which I would argue were the film's strongest points, but added an actual protagonists we can care about. I love the way this film deconstructs and we contextualizes the notion of the Chosen One with the art that's Ryan ghostling's characters go through. What makes you a hero if not believing that you can be one, and how we can deceive ourselves into actually finding purpose and meaning, and ghosting is giving a typically quiet and reserved performance, which works very well for non human character we can project ourselves on to to a certain extent, and we get too excellent supporting words, both different types of Fan fatalite, because this keeps the noir roots of the original film. You have another Almas who's the one who kind of hopes or protagonists into the story, like like it often happens in in noir, in a way that he can't resist, even when he knows he's being manipulated, because she's literally computer, so not to hard to figure it out, and severe hooks as more of a pulpy, that kind of James Bonds Type Evil Woman, and that's another quality of the film,...

...that it manages to be both an introspective and thoughtful piece of Scifi, you know, looking at identity, which is what good if I can do, while also being this pulpy and entertaining mystery thriller with action scenes that don't feel like something we've seen a hundred times before. This balance is so hard to manage, and I think this film is one of the best examples of it. It's even manages to tie itself with the original film in ways that's mostly work, and even weaponize Jarett leader's obnoxiousness into something that's actually serves the film. It's visually impeccable as well, with the standout actually being a sex scenes of salt, which explores the evergreen theme of identity, as I do the too, in a creative visual manner. Roger Deakins Semi Cinematography is as gorgeous as you'd expect from him, particularly using the Nevada desert for some dis turning shots. And yes, it's a great film. The only feel I think I saw twice in theaters. That's yea and yeah, definitely my favorite. Blade runner two thousand and forty nine is a film that I had avoided for a long time because, like Matthew, I'm not a big fan of the original. When I heard that will going to be featuring this film the podcast, out a sided. Okay, I'm going to have to finally rewatch the original and then rewatch this one. And not only matthew, but also Tom who isn't participating with us this week, had told me the blade runner sequel is better than the original. It doesn't really matter. If you didn't like original that much, still might like the arecup for more. So I thought, okay, you know, we'll see what happens. So I really watched the original blade runner and came out with pretty much the same opinion, and that it was a well done film. Are Great visuals, but not really well paste and not really with a very great lead character. So I thought like Hare's a bit to work on here. Will see what the sequel does with it. So the sequels of visually stunning. It probably up to the ante on it. Then, like Matthew said, it's just really studying what Roger Deacons has managed to do. I'm not only just a Nvada desert, but the whole color scheme of the film and all the new thing wled sets. It's a beautiful film to look at but on the same account, while upping the visuals of the original, it also slows down the pace of the original because the signle goes on for almost three hours, and the slower pace, I don't feel really added to the film that much. I did like the reverse of the originals dynamic. So the original is about, you know, Harrison Ford coming in terms of the fact that all came well, maybe as a robot, and over here we've got Ryan Gosslin character thinking, okay, well, maybe my memories aren't actually implats. It's been of a reversal and they're just kind of interesting. But I didn't finally, it was interesting enough to make up for the slow pace where there wasn't really a lot happening. It's sort of like deacons. Are created this great universe and the filmmakers really wanted to endowage it and show it off as much as possible. But by showing off all these visual vistas, the core of the story really gets dragged up to the point where there's no real urgency, except when a character pops up towards the end. And Yeah, look, I guess. However, all I mean there are some interesting identity messages in there. I don't think it took the material in any directions more than the original did. And while the originals a film, I think it's reputation outsie, it exceeds it's worth outside the side. Thing about the sequel wouldn't place it in my top out twenty or thirty films of two thousand and seventeen. And I'm probably even a little bit mystified by all the positive reception, because our slow paced films like this don't usually go down that well. So yeah, that's more intriguing, I guess, mean anything else, that the sequel was so highly regarded. So I'm not said that. I really did like the slow nature off it is and how visually stunning it was. This just really well executed it's just really but expert. I like how it played with the with the original, without really being, you know, the most directful of you ever could could be the main problem for me with this film is does that the bad guys in it, the story there. The conventions are just silly and tin this the most are typical villain you can possibly imagine and it really drags down the rest of the film, which does some really great things of precial...

...rules, some really good things action and manages to wance again play with our expectations. So I think it's I would probably call it a great film, but it's not one of the best films of twenty seventeen. And just like with and remember, the main saving grace theories really the visuals, which just turnding and a really beautiful yes, I agree with everyone that the visuals did extreme beautiful to look at to it's a definitely one of the main positive element about film. I have to say I quite liked the first blade runner. I think it's interesting to see the contrast series between, visually speaking, I mean the original this one, because, from from what I remember, in the original the atmosphere is way darker, let's say it looks darker than this one, the sequel, I mean we, which has this almost bright colors at some, some points. It's a film, a film I did like. The story is interesting to to follow and also gainstruks extremely nice, but something was missing for me to fully enjoy it. It's a slow film, but it features few action scenes here and there, so it's not, honestly, that that's slow compared to be to other films. And Yeah, it's a it's a it's a fun and definitely but yeah, something is missing for me to truly appreciate it. I guess the pump elements are what you didn't like, Chris, and I think also what explained the success so compared to other things that are similarly based. And Yeah, again I think it's unblending that, but I love that's a kind of philosophical sci Fi along with the don bey genre stuff, and I think that's something that I particularly enjoy more than maybe you guys. I bought aspects, and so that's why I responded to its much more strongly. It's a really, really good point that it's all the way it mergers these style. I can definitely see why you would love it so salt what's your favorite film off two thousand and seventeen? Earlier on when I talked about the death of style and I mentioned that it was one of only two films from two thousand and seventeen that I've seen three times, and this next film is the other film that I've seen three times. When I first went to see it in cinemas, I knew very little about the different trailer spots that come up and different like ads and imdb made it look very whatever, but I was told by some people on the ICM for if you in to horry, really need to check it out. So I'm like, okay, I'll go along. The film was, of course, to get out and seeing it during its theatrical Uran before one on the Oscar for original screenplay and everything, it was just an absolutely mind blowing experience I had. I had not seen such a well done, stylistically and thought provoking horror film in the cinemas for quite some time and I was quite curious about how it stuck up to revision. So I think the following year, during the horror challenge on the forum, I re watched and I like to even more and decide and look. I rewatched that for this this podcast, and when I did it actually display three billboards to now become my number one film of two thousand and seventeen. What a lot of people seem to really like about get out is the racial elements and there is a lot of racial satire in there and about like relations between, you know, black and white and about some of the tension going on there, especially if you're do any black person in the room. But what I really like about the film is it's been of a horror twist on meet the parents and you get there and your unsure if the girlfriend's parents are acting strange and their friends are acting strange or whether it's just in your imagination. He's so nervous to meet them. And you know, Daniel Khluia just gives an amazing performance in it, and you just not really sure. You know it's an overactive imagination or they really behaving in a bizarre sort of way. And I think one of the signature films that influenced it is eyes wide shut, and there's even a pun in the film that references that and it's the same sort of idea with like Tom Cruise wandering into you know, the secret society and you know not ture afterwards, how much you really imagine and how much is real. The same sort of ideas are played around with get out. And that's even before getting it to be a horror film, because the actual over horror doesn't really happen to the second part of the film. And then when the oivert horror does have its just such a lovely throwback to the horror films of the S and S, with some the furniture and there some the directors like Crodenberg, who are referenced...

...with on plot turns us on the way, given parts of a set up. Yes, it's an amazing experience and in addition to being such an atmospheric horror film, it's also a really laugh out love funning at certain points. I mean actually got to go and blobe nomination for best comedy, but we all know the Golden Globes are a bit funny with categories there. But there are some really funny parts. Then the film Balances Humor and drama so well, and I'm really big on films that are able to do that. and Get out just such such a great combination of horror, comedy, drama or this different elements blame together, such a feeling experience, so amazing at re watching and a couple of nights to go in the dead of night in my house with all the lights turned off. Just that intro scene with the Keith Stanfield and being mugged in the love the night just an amazing set up for an amazing film that Chris Might Not really light too much, but hopefully my other fell like I hoist to it. It's a film that really does something and then the more that you watch, and not the three viewings now, the more dynamic it seems to be. Yeah, I guess I don't have that much to add. Get out is a massive video claimed film and I agree with only a claim. It's very funny. It's works quite well as a swillow power film. The satiftical, all the political elements are quite well observed and well moveing into the story and then you can do yea is very a great actor. I'm curious to we watch it actually because I've come to appreciate him more since I thought he was good and get out, but I really liked him in other things and now I'm curious to see if his performances is something I would be actually even even better now. But yeah, it's just it's kind of a very efficient film and I do like I don't love that and but I guess I don't have that much to that much specific to to add. Yeah, I think get out is probably a smarter film than it is Great. I only liked the film. I really think it's well written. It's a very intelligent work where you can really see Jordan Peel fining all of these subtle hints and references and make it all go together. And I can also see these references coming out to play, you know, on the Rewatch as well. It's sort of writing is really in terms of just allusions at creativity and hints this spot, but the actual direction to me felt a little bit like the direction of a TV episode. It's well done but it was never visually striking. I think that the airiness is there and it works, but so many others have done that as well. So it just I never saw it aside from over the core concept, it never really hit me as that unique. Is a good film or come. The element of it work relatively well. I think the horror works relatively well, but it's not really the type of film that I can really love a suppose. Okay, so get out is a film that didn't really work for me. I can appreciate the fact that you know the to make, you try to have this different element mixed all together in the film who to create something different, let's say the program is that, individually, the done comedy elements didn't really spoke to me. The or elements are usually not the type of ror and really attracted to. To be to be fair. And Yeah, I don't know that the film together. Once again, I can appreciated the effort, you know, especially as a first film, it's an impressive feature. But yeah, some something just didn't didn't Click Withiz me, with with the film. And you know, since neither or the comedy really worked, I wasn't left with that with much to to enjoy. There is a social commentary, let's say, surround it, which is there, but I feel like it's treated in a way that is not very original, easier. So I couldn't really relate to to that that either. So yeah, sorry, soul, but just this film is not because of film is not for me. Maybe, maybe I will sit in a few years and see if my opinion as has changed, because I saw the other film by the director, which was released in two thousand and nineteen, I believe, the US, which I like. So maybe eventually, as I see more film from him, maybe I we watch get out and get gets more from it than I did the first time. I think you also hit on something that didn quite broke from...

...me there, in that the blend of comedy and horror, it didn't kind of take a little bit away from each other and it even round a little bit of you know, Kevin Smith's horror films, like the like Tusk, in the similar way which it just did. The Mix didn't quite work, even though there's in the virtual elements that are still striking. So I think that good summary. Okay, interesting to hear all of the guys you had to get out, because you've all had very odd different reactions to it. Matthew, in terms of Daniel Calua, he is an actor who, likewise, I've become very impressed with sense get out. I didn't actually think too much of his performance at the time and I saw it in cinemas and when he started to get, you know, SAG nominations and Golden Globe nominations for best that I thought what's odd because it wasn't the most striking part of the film, but when I rewatch get out and saw just the different ways he reacts the different things, it's it's more of a subtle on towed down perform and speak carries it really well. And for a couple of other really great performances for him, I can look for our widows, the Steve McQueen film. He plays quite an aggressive antagonist in there and it's really interesting to see him take on a different sort of role and for something similar, Queen and Slimy. He is very effective in that. I think actually mentioned queen and Slim in our two thousand and nineteen podcast. And of course the other one is the film Lee. Daniel Cluila has actually won the Oscar for Judas in the Black Messiah. is very good on that. Not as good as La Keith Stanfield, but he is really good at it. Just mentioning just with what Chris and Clem has said about the film and about the comedy in there. I actually do like him Smith's horror films. They're my favorite Kevin Smith films. Tust does get a bit silly towards the end, but then the actual ending of it is so tragic and I think generally the comedy is blended well in task and even yoga hoses and red state. I like them quite a lot as well. Comedy, though, is always going to be in the eye or, I guess, the ear or whatever, the beholder. So I guess it didn't work for you guys. I can't really argue too much about it. I just thought it was incredibly well timed and having the comic relief in there I guess sort of helped out, because otherwise it's an extremely grim tail when you try and work out, you know, what's happening to all these characters and there's extremely grim so like having the scene at the police station where Che Cause and the other officers and they all laugh as friend or whatever, just completely lightens the tone in a way that I don't know. For me least it worked and I guess the whole thing is just so outrageous what is actually going on, and having a little bit of black humor and there also helped. I don't know. I have seen us, which claim mentioned. I didn't like it anywhere near as much as get out, but I've only seen it once. The thing about us as it's got a very complex mythology which I don't think is balanced particularly well. So I guess it's a bit more original then get out, because Clem said that get up wasn't sue original. So it's a bit more creative, little bit more different, but I guess we get out a bit more down to Earth me, like this sort of thing could, you know, possibly happen with the right SCI FI technology, whereas with us you know it's just completely out there. But I'd still say it's fairly original. I haven't really seen anything quite like that. So it does write me as quite original and and it just breaks my heart for I'm Chris to say that he didn't think they get out was well directed and never visually striking, because it's got so many great visual parts in it for me, from the opening scenes of the Keith standfield being, you know, mugged and all the night, to that scene where the idea runs across the screen and shutters the the our mirror on their car, to just the way the House has seen from a distance and then, probably most particularly, the hitnotism scene. That's just amazingly well done for me, and the way slowly sinks into the sun can place just as incredible visual film. That whole falling out too black space has actually been mimicked in many music videos since. So I think the styles actually been influential and I think it's an incredibly visual film. And Yeah, I just think it's an amazing film to look at. It's amazing to listen to. But look, the film's actually in my all time top fifteen now, so I do think very highly of it. But Yeah, look, I understand it's not a film for everyone. I want to agree with you on the direction and it's not super flashy, but I do think there are some standouts, like you mentioned, and also, I think the direction in managing to blend the tunes, I guess. I guess it makes sense that Chris didn't think has highly of the direction because he had an issue with with the tunes. And Yeah, you and I would argue that the comedy in the whole compliments them, sends quae twit, and that's due to the do acting. So yeah, you guys wanted to me miss and Hannaker's get out. I guess that I like Jodan these...

...better. I think yees if how they have made this or if feel a minute as I have you film it, this would probably been a favorite of mine. But to get to my actual favorite film of two thousand and seventeen, it may surprise you that it is a little warmer, if not a lot warmer, and it is summer one thousand nine hundred and ninety three by Carla Simone, and I think very few, if any, other films have managed to not only capture childhood but the experience it in the actual visual feeling of being a child better. This is not a traditional narrative but a sensory experience, which is something I use for quite a lot of my favorite films. Is something that works really well for me that there's very little dialog and only slow, fluid exposition where characters, history and emotion gradually reveals itself and themselves. There is a sense of disorientation, but also play and innocence as a young girl settles into a new life with her aunt and uncle. We have great longer takes and scenes that simply grounds us in the play, that grounds us in actual childhood, and this slowly builds up our sense of a million bonds and relationships and this almost unique but instantly engaging formal story selling, at least to me, succeeds in every way. We are with her, we feel what she feels and we are ass detached from her surroundings as she is. There is this fluid minimalism, and I'm not sure if there's a better term than that, which almost makes it seem like these are memories running before our eyes, in the memories of a summer in one thousand nine hundred and ninety three in Catalonia, and it just has this incredible level of intimacy. And you know, contrary to so many of my other entries in in a top ten of this year, it never feels stoic or call the minimal it is actually wonderfully warm with it's filled with color and wonder. It's just an amazing way to approach characters and relationships. And it's also this incredible to think that this is the months first feature. So yeah, I just love this film. I can't wait to see what calls him on will do next to things. She could easily be one of our generations best directors, but obviously we shouldn't get our hopes up after a debut that we get burnt, but that quite often, I like somemer of ninety ninety three a lot, and I think how the reason why I like it so much as that are reminded me a lot of my second favorite film, Funny Alexander, and it's not quite like that, but it is sort of, if I can try and explain it. So the whole film is about the arm girl, try I'm coming of age and getting used to a new environment, but it's also about her reacting to the new relatives who she's living with and, you know, part of it's about, you know, her squaring off with her new adoptive mother and she's got this whole thing about not wanting entire shoe lace and there's this amazing scene where she manages to convince the grand father do up a shoelace and the glare that she gives her art as stepmother as a shoelace is getting done up is to say yeah, how like I've managed to I'm, you know, convinced my grandfather to do it. It's a bit of rebellion, sort of similar to like how in Funny Alexander, Alexander has to rebel against the Bishop. I guess the key difference, though, is that in summer one thousand nine hundred and ninety three, she's only really imagining the antagonism in funny Alexander. Actually really is antagonism in there to a degree. I don't know when the Bishop isn't really an evil characters, just misguided, but the Bishop is actually treating the children porting's no question about that. In summer nine hundred and ninety three, the art isn't training a poorly, but she's perceiving about as part of the confusion, and I thought that was worked in really well. And then she's got a younger cousin and the dynamics of the younger cousin also similar. A lot of confusing it there. Is She jealous of the Corsin? Does she like having around? She seems to sometimes like playing with her, but then she starts feeling jealous of her and want sort of just shut up. She tries to get her cousin lost in the woods. So a whole lot of it's about, you know, her trying to fit into this new situation and I thought there was really well conveyed and it just conveys so well the sort of negativity that I guess she sort of feels because of the environment and the change of environment and she's going to naturally rebel...

...against it. But then of course, over the course of the film that change as a little bit, and I want to spoil it too much, but it does progress. Are Quite interesting there. Either way. It's got an amazing central performance by it's lead out just in there. And Look, I was engaged the entire way through with the film and I would thoroughly recommend it. Yeah, someone and T twe is. I fin my I enjoyed I enjoyed the naturalism of it. I think it's a very smartly written film, especially in the way it tenders the the addoptive mother character, because it would be so easy to turn the film into a conflict between the mother, who starts well, the adductive mother who starts to mistrust the time, because it's a very difficult situation to deal with. And the film doesn't do that. It lets the character be complex and kind of even contradictory and like people are. And I think another strength of the FIM is the the ending. I guess I can not destroyed it, but I think the ending is a bit of a release of something that's been bubbling under the film, not not even Underman's clearly the subject of the film for the whole the whole way through, and I think that's dealch with rather way. I'm not sure why I didn't respond to as strongly as you guys, but it's a thing I like and I think it's interesting that both Chris and I have a film that's very much about summer and they much like we both highlight how it feeds like summer and that's that's a high point for both of us for can may your name, and this one. Exactly, summer night de three and summer night native. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, and I mean claim has listen, was I get out that summer not a fun summer, but it's summer, I guess, so just hate. So I don't know if I I height summer, but I think it the will interesting things with the darkness that comes with winter. And you live in Australia. So and why you plaze there you go. Yeah, it's somewhat year. I'm result the stuff. Yes, it sence Athens Solo in Australia. Well, okay, so to film. I liked as well. To be honest, I think it's an interesting story because there is this contrast between well, as you as you guys mentioned already, it's Sodommer, so it's obviously very present and and it's usually a period of time when you're a child that you like because you know you don't have to go you don't have to go to school, you go to holidays, you know you're a grandparents house or whatever are, you travel, so it's always a period that is, we usually filled with good memories. In this case, so it's well, as the main protagonist, a little girl, is not having a good summer at all because of, you know, what what happened the earth, Mosua passing away and, you know, having to live the well relatives. So that's which was interesting to see once again, the contrast between the the the period of the year and what she was facing. I was a bit scared before watching it, I would I was afraid that she would be, know, this hysterical child just making every making a mess and making the stuation very hard. And, to be fair, she does a bit, but not not that much. And Yeah, I think the film was quite quite enjoyable to watch because of because of that. If I can add just about the summer thing, just a small note. That's not about someone at three if you guys want to film about the feeling of some ear, there's a film that's literally called this summer feeling because of them only day, which I would really recommend that. It's finem takes place of a few summers and then in Paris and New York and it it's quite dramatic, but you know, all in dus again feeding off summer that we talked about. So yeah, I would, I would strongly recommended. I think Chris especially, you would like it. So is this? Will this be on your top list for two thousand and fifteen? And No, I don't. I mean I would have to get up it. I think it would be a bitch lower. So all right, fair enough, but I'll give with the viewing and the allother summer films obviously. Obviously have to recommend all of Eric Romer's fantastic yeah, summer films, especially the Green Ray, to everyone except Sol essentially, who really hate summer, about hate samow. It's it's less cematic than winter at our heights, im but and then that lovely note to take your off listening and you o us against soon. You have...

...been listening to talking images, the official podcast of ICM, for umscom.

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Episodes (61)